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Vol. XC, No. 1 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, SEPTEMBER 27, 1963 



By Subscription 



Kennedy Fre e s 
Married Men 
From Drait 

Co-ed Prospe cts Up 

On the assumption that the 
quest of a husband is at least 
one of a woman's reasons for 
coming to college, co-ed pros- 
pects took a definite turn for the 
better earlier this month, thanks 
to President Kennedy. On Sep- 
tember 10, Kennedy signed a 
Presidential order which in- 
structs local draft boards not to 
draft married men until the sup- 
ply of unmarried men of draft- 
able age has been depleted. 

This action, while not official- 
ly exempting married men from 
military service, does virtually 
free husbands from being draft- 
ed. At the present time, the av- 
erage drafting age is twenty-two 
or three, and since liability to 
the draft starts at age eighteen, 
there is a very large "pool" of 
unmarried and draftable men 
available. 

Aids College Students 

Kennedy's action can also be 
viewed as an "indirect" means 
of preventing college and grad- 
uate students from having to 
spend time, after completing 
their education, in military ser- 
vice. Since a student is granted 
a 2-S deferment from being 
drafted, four years of college 
and possible graduate work al- 
low him considerable time to 
find that right woman; and a 
permanent deferment. 

It is doubtful that many men 
will get married solely to avoid 
the draft, but it is obvious that 
the pressures or reasons for get- 
ting married have not been di- 
minished. 

Norm Gillespie 




Phillips Challenges 
College To Maintain 
Spirit Of Inquiry 

Bates began the year-long celebration of itself yesterday. 

President of the College, Dr. Charles F. Phillips, addressed 

the annual Convocation on the subject of change to formally 

open the Centennial Year. * rrrr — — 

In his inimitable style, the I establlshed Bates as a private 

college of the liberal arts — 



Items 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

— has 259 members, four of 
whom are foreign students. 

— is the 100th class to enter 
Bates College. 

— comes from 14 states and Jap- 
an, Sweden, France, and 
Somali. 

— averaged on their college 
boards 600 in verbal and 610 
in math. 

— has 80% of its public school 
graduates coming from the 
top 1/5 of their class, and 50% 
from the top tenth. 

— contains 20% private school 
graduates. 



Co-education begins as Frosh hike to Thorncrag 



Seniors Lead Dean's List 
With 20% On Honor Roll 



One hundred twenty-nine stu- 
dents, including graduates, had 
a qpr of 3.2 or better last semes- 
ter and thus made the Dean's 

List. 

The total figure of 129 repre- 
sents fifteen per cent of the en- 
rollment. 

Class of 1964 

Norman Bowie, Robert Boyd, 
Nancy Conway, Marion Day, 
Nancy Day, David Dhliwayo, 
Douglas Dobson, Marilyn Full- 
er, Norman Gillespie, David 
Harrison, William Haver, John 
Holt, Richard Hoyt, Nora Jensen, 
David Johnson, Judith Faye 
Johnson, Roger Klein, Morris 
Lelyveld, Dorothy March, Rhoda 
Morrill, K. Scott Norris, Jon Ol- 
sen, Raymond Parkin, Penny 
Polleys, Marjorie Powell, Arthur 
Purinton, David Quintal, John 
Schatz, Gracia Seekins, Eric Sil- 
verberg, Gail Sisson, Sarah 
Tucker Smith, Richard Walker, 
C. Kenneth Yates, William 
Young, Margery Zimmerman. 



Class of 1965 

Cynthia Bagster-Collins, Carol 
Bishop, Edward Brooks, Arthur 
Bruder, Carol Chase, Daniel 
Clarke, Laura Deming, Peter 
d'Errico, Shirley Fuller, Thomas 
Henderson, Susan Huiskamp, 
E. Derek Hurst, Leon Hurwitz, 
Susan Ingham, Dennis Keith, 
Louise Kennedy, Carolyn Kra- 
ger, Gordon McKinney, Carolyn 
Melander, Herbert Mosher, John 
Noseworthy, Linda Olmsted, 
Abigail Palmer, Phyllis Porton, 
Barbara Reed, Ernest Peter 
Reich, Jeffrey Rouault, Ronald 
Snell, Rosemarie Staddie, D. 
Russell Wagenfeld, Sheldon York. 
Class of 1966 

Paul Baker, Everett Barclay, 
Elizabeth Bogdanski, Priscilla 
Brown, Royce Buehler, Linda 
Carter, Carole Cooper, Phil- 
ip Daoust, Lois Hebert, Alice" 
Kaplan, Claudia Lamberti, Ju- 
dith Laming, Rebecca Nally, 
Jean Ouellette, Robert Parker, 
Kenneth Petke, Susan Pitcher, 
Phyllis Schindel, Elwood Trask, 
Lionel Whiston, Ruth Woodford. 



Healy Emphasizes Freedom In 
Pursuing Liberal Education 



President developed his speech 
around the idea of the spirit of 
inquiry imparted to the College 
by the founding fathers of Bates. 
Dr. Phillips avoided the tempta- 
tion to reminisce, pointing out 
the need to look forward in plot- 
ting the course of the College. 

"To me," said Phillips, "the 
most significant fact about our 
Centennial Year is that it finds 
a Bates which is not drifting, not 
resting on its laurels, but con- 
stantly seeking new ways to 
serve society." 

This "momentum of the Col- 
lege," as Dr. Phillips termed it, 
is due to and reflected in the 
present student body and facul- 
ty. In addition, much credit 
must be given to the founders of 
Bates. Certain of their decisions 
and beliefs were cited in the ad- 
dress to demonstrate the re- 
markable foresight they had. 

"First, our founding fathers 

Bates Aids Students 
With $245,000 



Calendar 

Saturday, Sept. 28 

Football at Norwich 
Dance in Alumni Gym, 8-11:45 
p. m. 

Sunday, Sept. 29 

Christian Science Frosh Re- 
ception, Women's Union, 6- 
10 p. m. 

Tuesday, Oct. 1 

WRJR Mass Meeting, Filene 
Room, 4-5:30 p. m. 



Before the freshmen registered 
on Monday, September 23, Dean 
Healy and Dr. Cummins told 
them briefly about the first two 
goals of the Bates Plan of Edu- 
cation and how these goals 
should guide them in choosing 
their courses. 

Dean Healy, speaking about 
the first goal of the Bates 
plan emphasized the meaning of 
freedom for an educated man, 
and how diversity in education 
has the advantage of usually 
making this freedom more read- 
ily understood. 

Because the educated man is 
free in context of understood 
necessities, is able to see nature's 
and society's obligations, and 
sees that life is complex and or- 
ganically interrelated, he is said 
in his understanding by a wide 
range of courses and interests 



giving him insight into many 
different fields and realms of 
nature and society and himself. 

The end goal of a hberal arts 
education, or indeed, any educa- 
tion, said Dean Healy in clising, 
is the liberation of oneself. 

Dr. Cummins spoke briefly to 
the freshmen about vocational 
development and Goal Two of 
the Bates Plan. He emphasized 
that choice of a career is made 
after a long process of many de- 
cisions and changes, and for this 
reason, too, Freshmen must not 
specialize too soon, but "look 
around" for a major and for the 
career they would like to follow. 

Dr. Cummins also spoke of the 
employer's growing interest in 
a widely diversified education 
and their tendency to examine 
the student's development as an 
individual. 



Nearly $245,000 in student aid 
was granted to Bates College un- 
dergraduates during the past 
academic year, Dr. Charles F. 
Phillips, Bates president, has an- 
nounced. Ten years ago the to- 
tal was less than $80,000. 

Commenting on this increase, 
Dr. Phillips said, "At a time 
when an increasing number of 
young men and women are rea- 
lizing the values of a college ed- 
ucation, it is essential that finan- 
cial aid be made available to 
those deserving students who 
might otherwise find it impossi- 
ble to attend college. At Bates, 
we have again been able to in- 
crease our aid to students in the 
form of scholarships, loans, and 
campus employment.' 1 

Dr. Phillips indicated that 
$124,000 in scholarships, $70,000 
in loans, and over $50,000 from 
campus employment went to 
Bates students during the 1962- 
63 college year. Ten years ago 
the College granted $40,000 in 
scholarships, $7,000 in loans, and 
$32,000 from campus jobs. 



DEBATE NOTICE 

All upperclass candidates 
for the debating squad are 
asked lo attend a meeting at 
4:00 p. m. today in the De- 
bate Room, Peitigrew Hall. 
A meeting will be held ear- 
ly naxt week for all fresh- 
men interested in debate, at 
a time to be announced. 



meaning an institution support- 
ed by private funds and gov- 
erned by its own independent 
board of trustees." Thus, the 
emphasis on the role of the in- 
dividual was evident in the 
earliest actions concerning Bates. 

The President was quick to as- 
sure his audience that he was 
not opposed to government-sup- 
ported colleges. 

Favors Gov't Support 

"My opposition," he asserted, 
is to a situation in which all col- 
leges would become heavily 
dependent upon government 
funds." 

Continuing to illustrate the 
wisdom and spirit of change of 
the founding fathers, President 
Phillips commented on their de- 
cision in favor of co-education. 
"True, Oberlin College in the 
mid-west began to admit co-eds 
in 1833; but when Bates opened 
its doors to them in the fall of 
1863, it was the first college on 
the entire East coast to do so." 

The founders of Bates abol- 
ished not only discrimination 
against women, but also discrim- 
ination on the basis of race, 
color, or creed. ". . . This fact 
provides my third illus tration of 
how their early decisions still 
contribute to our progress to- 
day," said the President. 

The decision that the college 
should play an important role in 
the building of character was 
the final example of the far- 
sighted actions of Bates' early 
developers. 

Willingness To Change 

From these separate illustra- 
tions, Dr. Phillips concluded 
that, ". . . Our founders' great- 
est contribution is found in their 
willingness to institute change- 
not change just for the sake of 
change, but change when their 
analysis indicated that it would 
be beneficial." 

The President then pointed out 
several basic educational ques- 
tions to which he directed his 
audience's attention, and sug- 
gested areas for evaluation dur- 
ing the coming year. 

"It is in the spirit of our 
founders," said President Phil- 
lips, "to use this Centennial 
Year to consider carefully still 
other changes to adopt those 
which will make a better Bates 
and to reject the others. It is in 
this spirit of inquiry that I wel- 
come all of you, both students 
and faculty, to the campus for 
this Centennial Year." 

Peter d'Errico 



5 

TWO 



BATES COLLEGE, SEPTEMBER 27, 1963 





CHDC— Chase Hall Dance Com- 
mittee 

WAA — Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation 

Stu-C — The Student Council 
(men's government associa- 
tion) 

Stu-G — The Women's Student 

Government 
Student Senate — Joint govern- 



Bates Vocabulary List 



ing body which is to incor- 
porate Stu-C and Stu-G 
PA — The Publishing Associa- 
tion 

CA — The Christian Association 

OC — Outing Club 

Roger Bill — The Administration 

Building, Roger Williams 

Hall 

JB — John Bertram Hall 



Panda U — • East Parker 

Libe — The Library 

Den — "Health bar" in lower 
Chase Hall 

Den rat — Person seen constant- 
ly in the Den 

Cultch — Cultural Heritage, a 
required course for juniors 
and seniors 

jjit (as in "hit the exam") 



Do well on 
Pipe — (as in "takepipe") That 

through which runs the gas 

you take 
Batesy — Anything traditional is 

Batesy 

Gnome — (pronounced with hard 
g) Batesy maintenance man 

Nuggets — Bits of knowledge 
that are supposed to epitom- 



ize the entire contents of a 
reading assignment or course 
WRJR — Campus radio station 
WCBB — Educational TV station 
Gut — An "easy" course 
Fishbowl — Large study room in 

the libe 
Townies — Local gentry 
Prexy's Puddle — Lake Andrews 
Cage — Gray Athletic Building 



if- 



72 Lisbon Street 
Lewiston, Maine 




Welcome . . . Class of 1961 

(SORRY, MEN — WE'RE FOR THE GIRLS ONLY) 




We Know Your Closets 
Are Filled With New 
Fall Clothes • ♦ But 



After youVe settled (to study) and you find 
you need a short skirt, slacks, a pair of socks, 
another sweater or half slip, a dress for a 
special date, we'll be more than happy to show 
you what you ask for. 



Better still, the very first trip downtown, come 
in and browse around. We'd really like to 
meet you. 



MOHAIR BLEND TWEED 
PINK - WHITE COMBINATION 
GREEN - ORANGE COMBINATION 

Sweaters that are so beautiful to the eye, so wonder- 
ful to wear. These tweed beauties are cabled for effect. 
Try them with skirts for a soft feminine look. 
Sizes 36 to 40 — 12.98 



P. S. Many Bates Girls enjoy the convenience 
of a charge account with Ward Bros. We'll be 
very happy to explain how easy it is to send 
the bill home. It takes only 4 minutes (from 
start to finish) to open an account . . . 
try us! 



STORE HOURS: 
OPEN MON. AND FRI. EVENING UNTIL 9 P. M. 
TUES. TO SAT. 9:15 A. M. - 5:15 P. M. 



BATES COLLEGE, SEPTEMBER 27 



1963 



THREE 



Editorials 

| Save The STUDENT 

Each week during the school year the STUDENT is pub- 
lished by and for the students of Bates College. Its primary 
purpose is to preview and report the events of the campus, 
and to include within its pages essays, articles, letters and 
poems on a variety of subjects. 

During this, the Centennial year, there will be an excep- 
tional number of special events and noteworthy individuals 
on campus and the STUDENT will be reporting on all of 
them. An excellent means of retaining a permanent record 
of the activities of this Centennial Year is simply to retain 
each week the copy of this ewspaper which you receive. 

And, if present plans materialize, it will not be only events 
and men which we shall be commenting upon, but also the 
thoughts and sentiments of students who participate in, or 
are close to, the planned activities of the weeks ahead. Some 
of these comments will be merely informative, while others 
will intend to be provocative. In either case, their purpose is 
to inform and entertain the reader in the hope of adding to 
his participation in Bates College's one hundredth year. 



The Freshman Reading Program 

During the past three years, the Freshman Reading Pro- 
gram has improved markedly, both in the selection and 
treatment of books. 

No longer are selections simply read and forgotten. Last 
year, a group of upperclassmen participated in a panel dis- 
cussion before the freshmen, who were able to ask questions 
of the panel members. And this year, the program went a 
step further as the freshmen were divided into groups of 
twenty to discuss their reading with selected faculty mem- 
bers. 

The scholarly and dry selections of previous summers have 
been replaced by The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin and 
Excellence — Can We Be Equal and Excellent Too? by John W. 
Gardner. Neither book is very long, and both focus on issues 
and problems which are vital in contemporary America. 

The English and Speech departments have made these 
books the subject of the initial papers and discussion topics 
for the fall semester to further supplement the summer pro- 
gram. 

We herald these changes for they are significant. Yet, 
even as the program expands, one definite limitation re- 
mains. Only a single hour is allotted for discussions during 
Freshman Week. This hiatus from a constant week of lis- 
tening to, and being tested by, faculty and administration 
members is not enough. An evening should be minimal, but 
is also sufficient for these discussions. 

The lack of a free evening for these discussion groups 
prompts the more general question of whether Freshman 
Week emphasizes talks and traditions at the expense of dis- 
cussions and time for thought. 

If this is the case, and it seems to be, then substitute an 
evening of discussions for Traditions Night or Men's Night. 
Let the freshmen get to the business at hand — the exchange 
of ideas in pursuit of an education. Invoke the past, but not 
at the expense of the present. 

' 

The Young Republicans 

During the past school year, the Young Republican Club 
of Bates College struggled into existence. It toddled and 
even walked a little, but like all youngsters it needs more 
time and encouragement before it reaches maturity. 

In the columns to the right, President Andersen paints a 
glowing portrait of the Club's progress to date; and by ex- 
tension invites all of "Republican persuasion" to play their 
part in mobilizing an effective organization. 

On a campus marred by political antipathy, we welcome 
the Young Republican Club. We do not agree with many 
of their stands on various issues, but as long as they are 
willing to take a position this newspaper will continue to 
publish their ideas. 

We hope that our readers will also aid this organization 
by taking advantage of the opportunity this newspaper af- 
fords for pointing out the problems and limitations of "Re- 
publican persuasion." 



An Explanation 

The editorials of this newspaper are written solely by the 
students on the Editorial board. The comments are personal 
opinions, but they also represent the policy of the STUDENT. 

All of this week's editorials and practically all of the sub- 
sequent editorials are written by the Editor-in-Chief. Upon 
occasion, however, another member of the staff may express 
an opinion and, in this instance, his initials will be printed 
after his comments. When no initials appear, it is under- 
stood that the Editor-in-Chief is responsible for the editorial. 



James Baldwin- 
Conscience Of 
The Am. Negro 

The Fire Next Time, by James 
Baldwin, is the author's latest 
and clearest statement of the 
Negro's situation in this country. 
During the summer, the fresh- 
men were asked to read this es- 
say, and those who did became 
part of the growing audience 
which has made this book the 
best selling non-fiction work of 
the past thirty weeks. This 
book should be read by all who 
wish to understand the racial 
dilemma which engulfs America. 

For Baldwin, The Fire Next 
Time represents the culmination 
of many ideas which began with 
a "religious experience" at age 
14. In The Fire Next Time, he 
briefly describes this experience 
and, subsequently, his reasons 
for leaving the church. 

Love and Hate Pivotal Theme 

It was here that the theme of 
love and hate, which dominates 
his early works and is still the 
pivotal force of his writing, be- 
gan to take shape. Baldwin left 
the church because its ministers 
did not practice what they 
preached. He, later, left Ameri- 
ca because its citizens don't 
practice what they preach. 

Graduating from DeWitt Clin- 
ton High School, Baldwin met 
author Richard Wright, who was 
to become his literary mentor. 
("I was broke, shabby, hungry 
and scared. He read my first 
novel . . . and his support helped 
me to win my first fellowship.") 

Dark and Desolate Land 

In his novels: Go Tell It On 
The Mountain. Giovanni's Room, 
and Another Country, Baldwin 
portrays a dark and desolate 
wasteland. Men and women wal- 
low in suspicion, fear, hate and 
lust, searching hopelessly for a 
sanctuary from suffering i — which 
it is obvious their creator has 
not been able to find or fathom. 

For James Arthur Bald- 
win comes from the same 
clay as the damned and 
defeated spiritual nomads 
who populate his novels. 

With the proceeds from such 
awards as a Eugene F. Saxton 
Memorial Trust Award, a Ros- 
enwald Fellowship, a Guggen- 
heim Fellowship, a Partisan Re- 
view Fellowship, and a Ford 
Foundation Grant-in-Aid, Bald- 
win left race-conscious America 
for race-tolerant France. He 
spent ten years in the color- 
blind climate of Paris, but as he 
says, "I realize now that if I 
was preparing myself for any- 
thing in Europe, I was preparing 
again for America." 

Oppression Must Be Known 

Upon his return, Baldwin be- 
came a militant campaigner for 
civil rights, and in Nobody 
Kncws My Name, a bitter an- 
tagonist of the white communi- 
ty. Baldwin insists, "The facts 
of Negro oppression must be 
stated," but has come to add, 
"but being oppressed doesn't 
necessarily make one individual 
better than another." 

(Next week we shall consider 
more specifically what 'Baldwin 
says in The Fire Next Time 
about love and hate, and, the 
moral inferiority of the white 
American.) 

Norm Gillespie 



i « 

Young Repubs Report 
On Year Of Progress 

By BRADFORD ANDERSEN '66 

When three Freshmen from the class of '66 and an in- 
cumbent (class of '65) swept the open election of the Bates 
College Republican Club just one year ago, there began a 

trend toward political awareness,* 

general interest and direct par- 



ticipation in poltical affairs by 
Bates College students. Since 
that time collegiates of Repub- 
lican persuasion have had a 
chance to build an organization 
of stature that rivals other col- 
lege and state groups. 

Growth and Vitality 
Noteworthy 

The fact that our club is about 
to receive its charter as an of- 
ficial Young Republican Club, 
has increased its paid member- 
ship 100%; and participation in 
every major state Republican 
affair in the past year, evidences 
the growth and vitality present 
in our work. In addition to this, 
club officers holding special 
county and state offices (includ- 
ing membership on the state 
delegation to the National 
Young Republican Convention) 
places the Bates club in a posi- 
tion of prominence. 

Active in State Politics 

The Bates Republican Club is 
in a unique position. Although it 
is only the third largest in mem- 
bership (among Maine college 
clubs), its members probably 
hold more representative posi- 
tions on the Maine council than 
any other club. This means that 
our members are offered a price- 
less chance to extend their in- 
terest in politics while partici- 
pating with colleges throughout 
the state. 

None of us could have realized 
last year how far a group of 
young college students could go 
in building important political 
and personal relationships. Com- 
ing onto the scene as we did 
without any real experience ex- 
cept for the parts we played in 
the Nixon campaign, it is en- 
couraging to stand midway be- 
tween the establishment of an 
active club and an important 
presidential election knowing 
that a solid organization stands 
ready to play its role. For any- 
one with even the least political 
inclination, it is an unsurpassed 
opportunity that may even be 
missed in adult life. 

(The second half of President 
Andersen's comments will be 
published in the next issue of 
the STUDENT.) 



Channel 10 Selects 
Series On Behavior 

A new series of television pro- 
grams dealing with current re- 
search in experimental psychol- 
ogy has been announced by 
WCBB to start Thursday at 7:30 
p. m. for the next ten weeks. 

This program series, entitled 
"Focus on Behavior", was pro- 
duced by the American Psychol- 
ogical Association in cooperation 
with the National Educational 
Television Network. The pro- 
grams have been designed to de- 
velop greater public appreciation 
of psychology as the scientific 
study of behavior, and to stimu- 
late interest among students who 
may wish to pursue the study of 
psychology as a career. 

Series Visits Labs 

Each program of the series 
comprises a filmed visit to the 
laboratory of a distinguished ex- 
perimeter in this field. Subjects 
covered will include the role of 
perception, the mechanisms of 
the brain that control behavior, 
man's ability to learn, the devel- 
opment of creative thinking, a 
study of the bargaining process, 
and man's need to achieve. 

The TV host for the series will 
be Dr. John G. Darley, Professor 
of Psychology of the University 
of Minnesota. The series was 
produced under a grant from the 
National Science Foundation, 
expressly for use by the 74-sta- 
tion National Education Net- 
work. 



To Members of the 
Bates Community: 

The parents of Dale Arnold 
Hatch wish to express their 
appreciation to all who paid 
their respects to Dale by at- 
tending his service in Bridge- 
water, Mass., on May 16; also 
for the many beautiful floral 
arrangements and kind per- 
sonal notes from his class- 
mates and friends. Dale was 
proud to be a member of 
Bates, Class of 1966. 



'Bates 




Stucfmt 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Sally M. Smyth '65 
Secretary 

Janet McEachern '66 News Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 Feature Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot '64 Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

Herb Mosher '65 Editorial Assistant 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Kent Taylor '64, Judy Marden '66, Rich- 
ard Derby '66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell 
'66, Perry Bruder '65. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 

"Published weekly at Chase Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
784-8621 (Sundays only). Printed at Auburn Free Press, 06 Court Street, Au- 
burn. Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30. 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



t 



4 

FOUR 



BATES COLLEGE, SEPTEMBER 27, 1963 



— - 



Football Squad Readies For Opener 

, _. i — — - . 

Squad Has Potential For Good Year; 
Frosh To Give Team Necessary Depth 




With NICK BASBANES 

First of all, I would like to welcome the class of 1967. Part 
of the customary introductions to Bates should perhaps In- 
clude a brief mention of what one should not expect from 
Garnet athletes, particularly from those competing on the 
gridiron. One should not expect Big Ten type play, and more 
important, one should not expect an undefeated season from 
the Bobcat eleven, for although Bates has turned out some 
top teams in the past (including last year's fine team with a 
5-3 record), the criterion of a successful season up here is 
usually a .500 season. The teams that Bates has for oppon- 
ents are usually from larger schools with much greater depth 
possibilities. As this year, like last year, should prove the 
exception to the rule, we'll leave the subject. A good year is 
forecast for the Garnet athletes, and we wish them all the 
best of luck. 

I would at this time like to welcome Dr. Peck back after 
a year's leave abroad. Congratulations are due Dr. Peck for 
his receiving the Swedish National Basketball Medal. Also, 
I would like to congratulate Mr. Roy Sigler, Jr., on his re- 
cent appointment to the Bates coaching staff. Sigler will 
fill the role of soccer and golf coach and as head trainer for 
the football team. While in college at Frostburg State, Sig- 
ler won 16 varsity letters in soccer, golf, track, and basket- 
ball. In track he holds his college's two mile and quarter mile 
records. In 1961 he was selected on the NCAA All-American 
soccer team. He reports that his soccer team is presently pre- 
paring for its seasonal opener October 9 at Nichols, and ex- 
presses confidence in the possibility of having a good season. 

Looking ahead to tomorrow's opener, the Bobcats have 
what appears to be a fine football team. The "I" formation 
has to this point proved successful. This innovation isn't 
one based on spectacular plays, but rather a formation de- 
signed to compensate for a limited number of available 
backs, and to help an inexperienced line in blocking. Every- 
one was impressed by the desire and improving consistency 
of the Bobcat squad in the past two scrimmages. Also rating 
high acclaim was the kicking of Capt. Paul Planchon. In both 
scrimmages, Planchon got off a punt of eighty yards. 

Perhaps most of you have heard that Bates will be playing 
its last home game with the University of Maine this year, 
October 26, Homecoming Weekend. The long time rivalry 
will end next year at Maine. Such a move, though unfor- 
tunate in bringing to an end the long time State Series, is a 
good one. Teams of our size can't hope to compete with the 
likes of big state universities. Bowdoin made the first such 
move last spring, and their rivalry will end next year also. 
The only straggler is Colby. 




Bobcats Take On Fast Attack Of 
Cadets At Northfield Tomorrow 



It's off to Northfield, Vt., to- 
morrow for the Garnet eleven, 
where they will meet the fast 
and versatile attack of the Nor- 
wich Cadets. For the Bobcats 
this will be the season-opener, 
however the host team opened 
last week at Colby, where they 
posted a 28-27 victory over the 
frustrated Mules. 

Last year's tilt between the 
two teams resulted in the first of 
five wins for the Bobcats, and 
the first of five losses for the 
Cadets. The score of that game 
was 20-14. 

This year's edition of Coach 
Robert B. Priestley's hopeful 
gridsters is composed of twelve 
returning lettermen, the fore- 
most of which includes five foot 
three inch junior halfback, Tony 
Campano, and last year's left- 
handed quarterback, Paul Nu- 
gent. Campano scored two of 
Norwich's touchdowns last Sat- 
urday, carrying the ball nine 
times in one of the marches to 
pay dirt. Nugent completed 
fourteen passes out of twenty- 



seven attempted. The ground at- 
tack netted 230 yards rushing. 

Outstanding Norwich linemen 
were Bob Shannon, Freeman 
Carr, Howard Loverling, and 
Bill Goetz. Their defense clicked 
smoothly, and twice they stopped 
Colby from scoring inside the 
one-yard line. Campano, in addi- 
tion to his offensive prowess, 
plays fine defense, too, as he 
blocked a Colby try for extra 
point. 

The probable Norwich start- 
ing lineup: ends, Shannon, Tosi; 
tackles, McLean, Collins; guards, 
Lovering, Alexander; center, 
Goetz; quarterback, Nugent; 
halfbacks, Campano, Wehrwein; 
fullback, Nolan. 



PHYS. ED. CLASSES 

All men's Phys. Ed. class- 
es will begin on Monday. 
Phys. Ed. classes scheduled 
for men on Saturday morn- 
ings will not meet at that 
time until November 16. 



By NICK BASBANES 
Sports Editor 

The Bates College football 
squad, after a successful week 
of game-like scrimmages, stands 
ready to open its season tomor- 
row at Norwich. Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 17, the Garnet eleven 
journeyed to Williamstown, Mass., 
where they met and tied the 
powerful Williams squad 7-7. 
Last Saturday the Hatchmen 
entertained the large University 
of New Hampshire squad here 
and dropped them to the tune of 
14-8. 

Coach Robert W. Hatch was 
pleased with the performance of 
his offensive squad, feeling that 
the ball was moved well. He 
wasn't quite as pleased with his 
defensive squad, however. This 
is due mainly to the lack of ex- 
perience in the line, particular- 
ly at the tackles. Last year's en- 
tire defensive line was lost 
through graduation. But steady 
improvement, coupled with keen 
desire and good pursuit, seem to 
be possessed by the green defen- 
sive squad. And it is these qual- 
ities, according to Coach Hatch, 
which are the basic ingredients 
of good defense. 

The tentative starting lineups 
released by Coach Hatch in- 
cludes juniors Grant Farquhar 
and Jim Callahan at the ends, 
juniors Carl Johannesen and 
Ted Davis at the tackle slots, 
seniors John Schatz and Dave 
Stockwell at the guards, and 
junior Steve Ritter at center. 

New Backfield 

Starting in the "I" type back- 
field will be sophomore Paul 
Bales at quarterback, senior Paul 
Planchon and junior Jack Wil- 
liams at the halfbacks, and 
sophomore Thorn Carr at full- 
back. Hatch was particularly en- 
thusiastic in his praise for his 
bread and butter backs, Capt. 
Paul Planchon, sophomore, John 
Yuskis, and Thorn Carr. 

Planchon, a repeater last year 
as an All-Maine choice, is a 
halfback on defense and is dan- 
gerous on punt returns. His kick- 
ing was outstanding in the two 



scrimmages. Yuskis, a letter win- 
ner last year as a freshman, is 
praised highly for his versatility 
and consistency. "He just does 
so many things well," are the 
words of his coach. He is con- 
sidered an excellent pass re- 
ceiver and a formidable halfback 
on defense. The other All-Mainer 
on the Garnet squad is 6' 1". 225 
lb. sophomore Thorn Carr, last 
year's top scorer and ground- 
gainer. 

Freshmen Promise 

Several freshmen show prom- 
ise and are expected to see con- 
siderable action during the sea- 
son. Among the twenty-three on 



the squad, the standouts are 
linebacker Gerry Ireland, end 
Bill Rafter, and tackle Mike 
Traverso. Also receiving high 
praise from the coach are line- 
backer John Wilska, placekicker 
Bill Paris, center Dick LaHam, 
and tackle Bill Brunst. 

Two notable personnel switch- 
es have been made this year by 
Coach Hatch. Grant Farquhar, a 
letterman, has been switched 
from the backfield to a starting 
position at end. He is fast, a fine 
receiver, and a tough blocker. 
And Jack Williams, last year an 
end, is starting in the backfield 
as the blocking back. 




Center Steve Ritter '65 prepares for Norwich game 



i 



EMPIRE 



NOW 
PLAYING i 



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I "The Three Stooges j 
Go Around The j 
World In A Daze"' 



SUN. - MON. - TUES 

"The Haunting 

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Russ Tamblyn 




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Student 



Vol. XC, No. 2 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



By Subscription 



Ciardi Speaks Friday On 
'HowDoesA Poem Mean ?' 

A recent recipient of the John Holmes chair at Tufts Uni- 
versity, John Ciardi, one of the foremost American poets, 
will appear here this Friday at 8:00 p. m. in the Little 
Theatre. 

Ciardi has taught at Harvard, 
Rutgers, and now at Tufts. Be- 
sides his teaching, he has lec- 
tured all over the country, is 
Poetry Editor of the Saturday 
Review, and has a television 
discussion show, "Accent." 

His recent / Met a Man was 
#4 on the New York Times 
Children's Book List, and Ciardi 
has been widely published as a 
critic, poet, and scholar. 

A short article about Ciardi's 
life and outstanding works ap- 
pears on page 4 of this week's 
STUDENT. 

Admission to the lecture, 
which is sponsored by the 
Bates Concert-Lecture Commit- 
tee, is by I.D. card only. 

Office Will Honor Requests For 
Specific Hours In Schedule 

The delights of no eight 
o'clock classes, and no professors 
of ill repute waned with a new 
scheduling system introduced 
last spring. Previously, the days 
preceding registration have been 
marked by groups of nervous 
students from which such des- 
perate comments as "The only 
way I can avoid an eight o'clock 
class is to take 309, but then I 
can't block Professor Higgle- 




Debating News 

All freshmen who are interest- 
ed in debating should report to 
Room 300, Pettigrew, this Fri- 
day afternoon at 4:00. At this 
time, Prof. Quimby will explain 
what debating entails, and what 
the prospects are for freshman 
debators. No previous debating 
experience is necessary; and all 
who are at all interested are 
urged to attend this meeting. 



Calendar 

Wednesday. October 2nd 
Vespers, Chapel, 9:30-10:00 
p. m. 

WAA Meeting, Women's Union, 
6:30-9:00 p.m. 

Thursday, October 3rd 
Maine Teachers Convention 

(through Friday) 
Discussion of car registration, 
Filene Room, 4-5 

Friday, October 4th 
John Ciardi, "How Does a 
Poem Mean?", Little Thea- 
tre, 8-10 p.m. 

Saturday, October 5th 
Football at Northeastern 
O.C. Mountain Climb 
Cross-Country with Colby here 
Rob Players movie — "Our 

Man in Havana," 7:00, 9:00 

p. m. 

Tuesday, October 8th 
Club Night 

Student Education Association 
Open Meeting, Women's 
Union, 7:00-8:30 



smith — and he flunks every- 
body!" 

Under the new system, course 
lists indicate both the time and 
the instructor of a class, but 
students have been informed 
that they may no longer submit 
a prepared schedule. The sec- 
tioning committee is now in 
complete charge of assigning 
students to particular classes. 
However, informed sources state 
that requests for certain pro- 
fessors will be honored when 
possible. Another loophole for 
those accustomed to daytime 
sleeping and those who fiercely 
guard their academic positions is 
the opportunity to exchange sec- 
tions with a willing (and seem- 
ingly masochistic) classmate. 

"The exacting work of the 
sectioning committee has been 
greatly facilitated by the new 
method," explains Miss Libbey 
of the Registrar's Office. Stu- 
dents employed by the college 
and those who have selected sin- 
gle section courses are scheduled 
first. The next step is the as- 
signment of those who have ex- 
pressed a section preference. 
Size of classes and a balanced 
schedule for the individual stu- 
dent are taken into consideration 
in processing the remaining ma- 
jority of students. At a college 
where many conflicting sched- 
ules must be processed by hand, 
rather than by computers, the 
new system saves both time and 
tedium. 



Mediterranean Slides 

Colored slides of Jordan, 
Isreal, Turkey, Greece, and 
Italy will be shown by Prof, 
and Mrs. Robert Berkelman 
in the Filene Room, at 6:45, 
Thursday, October 10. Any 
and all members of the Bates 
community will be welcome. 



Phillips Talks To Activity Heads; 
Explains Formulation Of Policy 
And Function Of Administration 

Approximately sixty student leaders of campus organizations met with President Phil- 
lips last Thursday night, to discuss the administration and formulation of school policy. 
Deans Healy, Boyce and Randall also spoke to the group which included faculty advisors 
for the organizations represented. 



Nethven Retires From 
Coram Library Post 

Mildred L. Methven, Assistant 
Librarian at Bates College since 
1959, retired in June after more 
than 40 years of service in li- 
brarianship. Miss Methven has 
returned to Minnesota, now 
making her home in St. Paul at 
1479 Raymond Avenue. She ex- 
pects to devote her leisure time 
to further exploration of her 
widely divergent cultural inter- 
ests, some travel, and possibly a 
course or two at the University. 

A graduate of the University 
of Minnesota and of the New 
York State Library School at 
Abany, Miss Methven devoted 
the early part of her career to 
the libraries of Minnesota, serv- 
ing for many years as Super- 
visor of Institution Libraries of 
the State Division of Public In- 
stitutions, as Assistant Librarian 
of the St. Paul Library, as Li- 




Mildred Methven 

brarian of the Braille and Sight- 
seeing School at Faribault. 

Miss Methven taught at the 
University of Minnesota, and 
later received a Fubright grant- 
lectureship in library science at 
the University of Dacca in East 
Pakistan. She has actively par- 
ticipated in the activities of 
the American Library Associa- 
tion and the Minnesota Library 
Association, and was the first 
president of the Hospital Librar- 
ies Division of the American Li- 
brary Association. Throughout 
her career, she contributed fre- 
quently to professional publica- 
tions. 



Speaking first, Phillips ex-* 
plained that the primary purpose 
of the meeting "is to enable stu- 
dent leaders to understand the 
framework of the college in or- 
der to know to whom they 
should turn" whenever they 
need some assistance. 
Division Of Policy 

"Policy making," the president 
said, "is divided between the 
Board of Trustees and the Fac- 
ulty." The latter has domain 
over all academic affairs and 
student life. All else, salaries, 
faculty members, etc., is decided 
by the Trustees. 

The president, representing 
the Board of Trustees, discharges 
certain of his duties to various 
individuals, who are collectively 
known as the administration. 
Commenting on this group, Phil- 
lips emphasized that the char- 
acteristic feature of Bates is 
that the administration is decen- 
tralized. 

One individual has domain 
over all decisions made in his 
area. Anything which has to do 
with alumni work is in the 
charge of Hank Stred. Anything 
which involves business or finan- 
cial aspects must be approved by 
the school treasurer, Mr. Ross. 
"Each of the school's adminis- 
trators," Phillips emphasized, 
"has the final say in his areas." 



Student organizations arise 
from the faculty's delegation of 
certain responsibilities to the 
students. The faculty advisor 
serves as a representative of the 
faculty to aid an organization to 
be the best possible, within the 
framework of faculty policy. 

"The faculty advisor is not," 
Dean Healy said, "a dictator or 
censor or there to run your 
business. He is not there to put 
an official Bates College stamp, 
whatever that might be, on an 
organization. 

Faculty Advisors 

"The faculty advisor is exact- 
ly what the term implies," Healy 
explained. He is a counselor 
with a fund of experience to 
help the organization when it is 
in doubt about what to do. In 
this position, a faculty advisor 
appreciates very much being in- 
formed of the group's plans and 
activity. 

Deans Boyce and Randall, 
respectively Secretary and 
Chairman of the Extra-Curricu- 
lar Activities Committee, in- 
formed the group of the role of 
this committee. According to 
Boyce, it has two responsibilities. 
It is a policy committee on co- 
ordinating the calendar of 
events," and a "co-ordinating 
board of general policy." 



Library Notes 

Periodicals Room shelving ar- 
rangements differ. Current per- 
iodicals are now placed in one 
alphabetical sequence on the 
shelves and racks, except for 
magazines issued by the U. S. 
government which appear to- 
gether following Z. The general 
periodical indexes such as the 
Reader's Digest have been re- 
shelved alphabetically. 

The upstairs reading area of 
the library will be available as 
last year from 8:00 a.m. until 
11:00 p.m. on Mondays through 
Saturdays and from 2:00 p.m. 
until 11:00 p.m. on Sundays. 

The attention of the student 
body is directed to fine sched- 
ules on overdue reserve books, 
as printed below and displayed 
on the library desk. 

Overdue Overnight Reserves 

Reserve books returned after 
9: 10 a. m. — 25 cents per book. 

Beginning at 1:00 p.m. an ad- 
ditional fine thereof will be 
charged for each overdue re- 
serve book. 

Overdue Meal-Hour Loans 

Reserve books due at 1:00 
p.m. or at 6:30 p. m. and not on 
the return truck when the libra- 
ry opens are subject to a fine of 
25 cents per hour or fraction 
thereof per book. 



'Our Man In Havana 1 

"Our Man in Havana" will be 
the Rob Players' first film pres- 
entation of the year, and will be 
shown on Saturday night at 7:00 
and again at 9:00. The price of 
admission is 50 cents, and sea- 
son tickets for all eleven films 
can be bought for $3.00. 

"Our Man in Havana" assem- 
bles an excellent cast headed by 
Alec Guinness, Ernie Kovacs, 
and Burl Ives in a tale of in- 
trigue on pre-Castro Cuba. 

Sells Vacuum Cleaners 

Guinness plays an Englishman 
who sells vacuum cleaners in 
Havana and is asked to be one 
empire's top agent in Cuba. Un- 
successful in recruiting fellow 
spies, Guinness decides to in- 
vent agents and fill out their fic- 
titious reports himself. The 
imaginary spy ring finally in- 
vents a huge and awesome mili- 
tary installation in the moun- 
tains. 

The high command, mean- 
while, has been impressed with 
their agents' work but becomes 
frightened and sends aids to 
Guinness. This leads to a great 
deal more confusion and fun. 

Guinness is, as usual, delight- 
fully funny. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



Bates Completes 
Eighteen Years Of 
Balanced Budgets 

The completion of 18 conse- 
cutive years of operation with a 
balanced budget at Bates Col- 
lege was announced Wednesday 
by Dr. Charles F. Phillips, Bates 
President. 

"Our Treasurer's Report indi- 
cates total ependitures of more 
than $2,200,000," said Dr. Phil- 
lips, "an advance of over $100,- 
000 as compared with the pre- 
vious twelve month period. Total 
assets increased by over $700,- 
000 to a new high of more than 
$10,600,000, and the college's 
endowment also reached a new 
high of $4,800,000, a gain of over 
$400,000 during the year. Schol- 
arship aid to students during 
1962-63 rose from $115,000 to 
$124,000." 
$1,000,000 

The report does not include 
nearly one million dollars in 
gifts and bequests made to the 
college in the past few weeks 
since the fiscal year closed. 

"Two decades ago," said Pres- 
ident Phillips, "our endowment 
and plant were valued at 
$3.3 million, in contrast to the 
$9.4 million of today. To the 
many friends of Bates who have 
made this growth possible, we 
owe a great debt of gratitude." 



Portland Symphony 

Season Schedule 
October 22 — Ania Dorfmann, 
pianist 

Beethoven Concerto No. 3 
November 19 — Norman Scott, 

base-baritone 
Arias from famous operas 
December 10 — David Baker, 

Richard Roberts, pianists 
Poulenc Concerto, St. Saens 

Carnival 
January 28. 1964 — Andrew 

Galos, concert master 
Frances Drinker, Sandra Hoff- 
man, flutists 
John Geller, horn 
Soloists from the Portland 

Symphony 
February 25 — Leslie Parnas, 

cellist 
Haydn Concerto in D 
B 1 o c h Schelomo "Hebraic 

Rhapsody" 
March 31 — Marlene Kleinman, 

mezzo soprano 
Patricia Brooks, soprano 
Eugene Green, baritone 
Robert Nagy, tenor 
"Carmen," complete concert 

version 

Tickets for the six-concert 
series are available to students 
for $4.00. For information, see 
Professor D. Robert Smith, Mu- 
sic Department. 



Guidance 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMS 

The Graduate Record Exami- 
nations, required for admission 
to many American graduate 
schools, will be conducted at ex- 
amination centers throughout 
the United States on November 
16. Educational Testing Service 
which annually administers the 
test, also set these four adminis- 
tration dates for 1964: January 
18, March 7, April 25, and July 
11. Seniors should inquire at the 
Guidance and Placement Office 
regarding registration proce- 
dures for the GRE tests. 
SERVICE ABROAD 

The U. S. Information Agency 
is interested in receiving appli- 
cations for employment oppor- 
tunities in service abroad and in 
Washington. The pamphlet, 
USIA Foreign Service — Career 
Opportunities for Young People, 
is available in the Placement 
Office. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Information for National Sci- 
ence Foundation Cooperative 
Graduate Fellowships is avail- 
able in the Placement Office. The 
closing date for receipt of ap- 
plications is November 1, 1963. 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAM 

Applications are now being 
accepted for the 1964 Federal 
Service Entrance Examination, 
the U. S. Civil Service Commis- 
sion has announced. This exami- 
nation, open to college seniors 
and graduates regardless of ma- 
jor study, as well as to persons 
who have had equivalent exper- 
ience, offers the opportunity to 
begin a career in the Federal 
service in one of 60 occupational 
fields. These positions are locat- 
ed in various Federal agencies 
both in Washington, D. C. and 
throughout the United States. 

Depending on the qualifica- 
tions of the candidates, starting 
salaries for persons appointed 
from this examination will be 
$4,690 and $5,795 a year. A writ- 
ten test is required except for 
those candidates who have at- 
tained a sufficiently high score 
on the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation Aptitude Test. 

Management Internships with 
starting salaries of $5,795 and 
$7,030 a year will also be filled 
from this examination. An addi- 
tional written test is required. 
Applicants for these positions 
must file by January 16. 1964. 



Dean Boyce Addresses Freshmen Men; 
DeanRandall Notes e Growing Up Process 5 



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By DEAN WALTER BOYCE 

One of the easiest things to do 
is to give advice. One of the 
most difficult is to take such ad- 
vice and act upon it in a ration- 
al fashion. Having made that 
opening gambit, I now feel free 
to address myself to the men of 
the class of 1967. 

Each new man at Bates is now 
entering a very important per- 
iod of his life — the transition 
between being at home and en- 
tering a world of individual res- 
ponsibility for self and family. 

I will not say that your four 
college years will work a com- 
plete change in you. It is fairly 
obvious that by this time many 
of your attitudes have been ra- 
ther firmly formed. However, I 
do velieve that your college ex- 
periences will bring about 
changes in each of you, some 
for the better, some for the op- 
posite, but the final results will 
depend upon what use you make 
of your opportunities here. 

Ask Questions 

You will be encouraged to ask 
questions, but not to become 
carping and destructive critics 
of all around you; you will be 
urged to look for answers to dif- 
ficult and complex questions, 
but not to become fanatics when 
you have founds a few satisfac- 
tory answers; you will be ex- 
pected to develop into responsi- 
ble men, but not to expect that 
responsibility carries with it 
complete individual freedom. 

Above all, you will be ex- 
pected to learn that community 
living of any kind, whether it be 
in an institution, on the job, in 
your family, or as a member of 
a democratic society, involves 
responsibilities and rules which 
please some but are unaccept- 
able to others. 

It also requires a continuing 
respect for honest differences of 
opinion and a basic considera- 
tion for the rights of others. It 
has often been said, and it re- 
mains true, that in a society a 
man's freedom to swing his arm 



By DEAN BARBARA RANDALL 



It isn't only spring with its 
promise of new life and tenta- 
tive growth which is exciting, 
but certainly the visible grow- 
ing up process noticeable on the 
Bates campus — from freshmen 
to seniors. This excitement is 
shared by all of us who work 
and live with you all during the 
year. 

Somehow freshmen accept the 
fact of growing up much more 
graciously because they expect 
to change in the weeks and 
months following high school, 
but the upperclassmen, on the 

other hand, consider maturity as 

\_ 

extends to the point where con- 
tact is made with another man's 
nose. 

In conclusion, bear in mind 
that each first year student is 
now an essentially unknown and 
untested addition to the Bates 
community (despite the mater- 
ial that rests in the admissions 
office files). It will be only a 
short time, however, before in- 
dividual actions, words, and at- 
titudes begin to form into im- 
pressions of others about you. 
Those impressions will become 
more fixed as you move ahead in 
your college years. 

Now Is The Time 

Now is the time for you to 
give thought to how you want 
your portrait to be painted, by 
fellow students and by faculty 
members, when you have com- 
pleted your work here. It is also 
time for you to consider careful- 
ly what you want to obtain from 
your college work, and how 
much energy and effort you are 
willing to invest in the process. 

Most of you, I am confident, 
will come up with meaningful 
and satisfactory answers to these 
questions and to many others 
which will confront you in the 
years ahead. 



MMMMI Itlllllll I UllflHUlllinillflllMWHmiinUUtUUUUUIItlllHIIltIHa 

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I Thurs, Fri., Sat.. Oct. 3, 4, 5 

I "Haunted Palace" 

- with - 

VINCENT PRICE 
LON CHANEY 

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a full-grown fact in their lives, 
However, there are several as- 
pects of this growing up process 
which are noteworthy. 

One is the perspective which 
maturity brings. Students sud- 
denly are able to see the other 
sides to questions and actions. 
More objectively they determine 
the ramifications of what they 
are and what they do. It is with 
an open mind that they view 
things and not with the blocked 
vision of the immature person. 
Perspective becomes increasingly 
important, for is not life often 
considered a jungle and thus 
the high point sought. 
Maturity Brings Security 

Also, maturity brings security 
in the sense of adaptation and 
gracious adjustment with the 
firm knowledge of personal goals 
and personal integrity. When 
one can contribute without a 
sacrifice in these areas, there is 
a certain sense of security. 

Finally, maturity helps the 
student toward a more meaning- 
ful contribution to campus and 
community life. He becomes ac- 
tive in organizations not just to 
make friends and influence peo- 
ple or to be a big wheel, but be- 
cause it is important to give of 
hiself in this particularm area. 
It often eans a shift of interest 
or concentration, developing a 
broader base of experience and 
contribution. 

Thus, the mature student is a 
desired product, and this process 
in which we all share is an ex- 
citing and challenging one. Be- 
ginning Freshman Week when 
the new members of the Bates 
family become part of the cam- 
pus, until the seniors don their 
graduation caps and gowns, 
hearts and minds are develop- 
ing and growing with the chal- 
lenge of new experiences, new 
decisions, new moral choices, 
and new intellectual and social 
stimuli. 



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A Gift To 
Your College 
Can Result In A 
Larger Income 
For Your Family 

Our Experienced Trust 
Department will be glad 
to work with you and 
your attorney on the fi- 
nancial and trust aspects 
of the educational gift 
you have in mind. 

Many a businessman is 
discovering these days — 
to his pleasant surprise 
— that a gift to his Alma 
Mater can bring definite 
future tax advantages to 
his wife and family. 

DEPOSITORS 
Trust Company 

The Bank That Is Busy 
Building Maine 

28 OFFICES 

Main Office: Augusta, Maine 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 

1 ■ mmmtkmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmhmmmmimmmmm 



THREE 



Channel 10 Carries Series 
Of Symphony Concerts 



The finest symphonies in the 
nation will be performing on 
Channel 10 this year, in a new 
series beginning this Friday at 
8:30 p. m. A network program of 
National Educational Television, 
the series is called NET Presents 
U. S. Symphonies and will pre- 
sent six concerts by the Pitts- 
burgh Symphony Orchestra, the 
Cleveland Orchestra, the Detroit 
Symphony Orchestra, the Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestra, the 
Hollywood Bowl Symphony, and 
the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

This Friday Night 

On this Friday's program, the 
Pittsburgh Symphony with Wil- 
liam Steinberg conducting, pre- 
sents Stravinksy's "Symphony of 
Psalms for Chorus and Orches- 
tra" and Schubert's "Symphony 
No. 9." The Mendelssohn Choir 
of Pittsburgh joins the Orches- 



tra for the "Symphony of 
Psalms", whose three movements 
are based on prayer, thanksgiv- 
ing, and praise, and are per- 
formed without pause. 

Tn the second concert, the 
Cleveland Orchestra, under the 
direction of George Szell, per- 
forms Beethoven's "Concerto for 
Piano and Orchestra No. 3," and 
his "Symphony No. 4." Annie 
Fischer is piano soloist. 
Sibelius 

Guest Conductor Thomas 
Schippers leads the Detroit Sym- 
phony Orchestra in a presenta- 
tion of Benjamin Britten's 
"Variations on a Theme of 
Frank Bridge," and Jean Sibel- 
ius' "Symphony No. 2," in the 
third program of the series. 

Later programs will be pre- 
viewed at a future date. From 
these brief comments what the 
programs will offer can be 
imagined. 




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Lindholm Explains 
Admissions System 

Eighteen per cent of those ap- 
plicants for admission who 
scored 700 or above on their 
College Boards were turned 
down by Bates College this past 
year. Dean of Admission Milton 
L. Lindholm, in a recent inter- 
view, emphasized the fact that 
Bates looks for the "all-around 
student" rather than the stu- 
dent whose only qualification is 
high academic rating. 

"In considering any appli- 
cant," Mr. Lindholm empha- 
sized, "we have to examine two 
fields of achievement, the acad- 
emic and the non-academic." He 
stated that no single factor un- 
der consideration is dominant to 
any great extent. 

School Record Best Guide 

In the academic area, the high 
school record is perhaps the best 
guide for college admission per- 
sonnel. However, here the fact 
that standards of grading vary 
from school to school hinders 
any clear-cut evaluation of the 
record. "I don't know of any 
teacher or professor who would 
deny the 'fact that an A in one 
course is not equivalent to an A 
in another course." Mr. Lind- 
holm stated. 

The College Boards supply, 
perhaps, a common factor in 
evaluating high school records, 
if there is any serious variance 
in school standards, it usually 
-hows up on the College Board 
results. These results in them- 
selves, however, are never the 
basis for acceptance or rejection. 

Non-Academics Important 

The n on -academic area is 
equally as important as the 
academic. "We must take into 
consideration such intangibles as 
character, personality, and moti- 
vation," Dean Lindholm added. 
"We interview almost all appli- 
cants who are eventually ac- 
cepted, but it is difficult to judge 
the non-academic in one short 
interview." 

To aid them in their evalua- 
tion of this area, the Admissions 
department depends on written 
recommendations and the non- 
academic side of the high school 
record. This includes participa- 
tion in clubs, sports, community 
activities and other areas where 
leadership, values and other per- 
sonal qualifications are reflected. 



SOUTH OF PARIS 




MASS LECTURE 

Friday. October 4, C.H. 401: 
Dr. A. J. Wright on Pascal. 



THE 

' ' H O B B " 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



(Peter Reich '65, Feature Edi- 
tor of the STUDENT last year, 
is spending his junior year 
abroad. To provide students with 
some idea of what the program 
entails, Peter will convey his 
impressions in what will hope- 
fully be a bi-weekly column. 
Editor.) 

The Atlantic Ocean, Thursday, 
September 17 

Last year, the feature section 
of the STUDENT ran a great 
many stories discussing and de- 
scribing Bates' Junior Year 
Abroad Program. The purpose 
of the whole campaign was to 
stimulate freshman to consider 
the possibility of spending their 
junior year abroad early enough 
so that all necessary arrange- 
ments could be made. 

This year I will be studying 
at the University of Grenoble, 
France. I hope to present, with 
some regularity (and with sup- 
plements from other Bates stu- 
dents abroad), a column discus- 
sing people, places, events, and 
life in general as seen by an 
American student in Europe. 

This is probably the last op- 
portunity I shall have to write 
before we dock early Sunday 
morning in Southampton. The 
life on the boat seems to have 
died down a bit in the past two 
days, since we have been having 
rough weather and the boat is 
constantly rolling. 

The first few days were love- 
ly. Everybody (about 750 stu- 
dents, half of them American) 
was somewhere outside soaking 
up the sun as if there were noth- 
ing else to do. But there was, 
and is plenty, to do. 

Aside from such regular activ- 
ities as a daily newspaper, daily 
calisthenics, folk dancing les- 
sons, bookstore, theatre, sketch- 
ing, music listening, and sleep- 
ing, there are each day several 
discussions sponsored by the 
Council on Student Travel or 
University groups. Topics in- 
clude the racial problem in the 
USA, Democracy in the USA, 
Sex and Morals in Europe, and 
many other topics. 

The cross section of European 
students on the ship make all 
these discussions very interest- 
ing. Also, language lessons are 



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given in Dutch, Spanish, Eng- 
lish, Finnish, French, Italian, 
Russian, and Danish. 

For the past three days, there 
have been discussions led by 
European students regarding life 
in the European universities. 
Many fortunate Americans find 
students from the popular Euro- 
pean Universities frienly and 
eager to help. The group from 
the University of Grenoble is 
small and we chat in English and 
French about the classes, social 
customs, money, travel, etc. etc. 

The SS GROOTE BEER is an 
old tub, built in 1944. She has 
been shifted back and forth 
from country to country, and is 
now on her last run for Trans 
Ocean Lines, after which she 
will go to the Greek Line. 

Among the many renovations 
which went into making the 
GROOTE BEER a student ship, 
was the building of a lounge, 
known as the Ocean Bar. This 
is one of the most popular places 
on the boat. 

With the most expensive 
oMnk (a whisky sour) at 28 
cents (American cents), and the 
creapest (a martini) at 19 cents, 
conversation quickly advances, 
and dancing becomes faster and 
faster. If one feels really cheap, 
the best way to spend an eve- 
ning is with beer. A bottle of 
Heinekins Dutch beer is only 13 
cents. 

With cheap booze, free run of 
the ship, and unsegregated 
quarters (boys and girls live in 
separate rooms, but boys rooms 
and girls rooms may be next 
to each other), night life goes on 
until the wee hours of the morn- 
ing, even when the clock is ad- 
vanced one hour at midnight. 

But all the entertainment is 
not, as one may be led to be- 
lieve, sex. There are movies 
every night, as well as discus- 
sions, and often there is danc- 
ing on the sports deck. Last 
night was an International Eve- 
ning, and students from almost 
every country you can name 
got up and sang a few songs. 

After this, Jim Corey, '63 and 
I were up until 2:00 AM with 
a bunch of English and Scot- 
tish students playing some in- 
sane but hilariously funny game 
called "Master, Matthew, Mark, 
Luke and John." 

There are several good guitar 
players on board ship, and often 
there are spontaneous folk sings 
on deck, or in the bars, in which 
one learns many new songs. 



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* 

FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



Editorials 



i: In The Chapel 



As many as five hundred students will not possibly be able 
to hear John Ciardi this Friday evening. And depending on 
how many townspeople and faculty members get to the Lit- 
tle Theater before them, the actual number of students ex- 
cluded from the lecture will be considerably more. 

Yet, cognizant of this fact, and knowing that when Basil 
Rathbone performed two years ago, people were turned 
away from the chapel, the individuals planning Ciardi's visit 
are making no attempt to accommodate the expected over- 
flow. 

Complaints have been registered in recent years about the 
decrease in student attendance at the Concert-Lecture series. 
Yet, now at a time when the pressures of exams and other 
obligations are least, when a well known speaker is coming, 
and when student attendance is certain to be substantial, the 
planners are insuring that student attendance will be re- 
stricted. 

We realize, considering the available facilities, that some 
persons may have to be turned away. But the chapel, which 
has nearly twice the seating capacity of the Little Theater, 
is just as available as the theater. 

Every student at this college has paid for Ciardi's visit; and 
every student is entitled to the opportunity to hear his lec- 
ture. 

Let John Ciardi be heard by as many individuals as possi- 
ble. Re-locate his lecture in the chapel. 

The Administration 

If this school year is not totally unlike any other, student 
complaints about the administration will be frequent. Yet, 
the administration, and the policy it follows, exists for spe- 
cific reasons. 

President Phillips, last Thursday evening, explained these 
reasons. He told how policy is formulated and outlined the 
framework within which it is carried out. (See story on 

pg- 1) 

At that time Phillips addressed the leaders of various stu- 
dent organizations, but his comments should be of interest to 
all students. 

For faculty committees and administrative officers exist 
"for the best interests of Bates College, and its students," 
and to make improvement possible. To implement change, 
a student must be familiar with the system which governs 
the college, and work within it — even when the eventual 
goal is the reform of the system itself. 



'New Voices' 

John Holt's voice is not new to this publication. Two years 
ago, he contributed a short-lived Jazz column; and last year 
reviewed Twentieth Century book selections available in pa- 
perback. The success of his book "reviews has prompted Holt 
to continue to bring to the attention of the studentry, books 
of recent vintage which he finds interesting and worthwhile. 

"New Voices", however, will not be devoted exclusively to 
book reviews. In this week's column and in subsequent 
weeks Holt will comment upon contemporary literary and 
problems wherever he finds them. In his own words, he does 
not "write for everyone on campus." His ideas express his 
particular viewpoint and "are intended for all Students." 

Our publication of "New Voices" does not represent an en- 
dorsement of Holt's viewpoint. Publication represents the 
STUDENT policy that this newspaper is available to all stu- 
dents who wish to express their sentiments. The agreement 
of the editors with the ideas expressed is completely irrele- 
vant to their publication. 

John Holt's comments do not represent the policy of the 
STUDENT. The publication of his columns does represent 
STUDENT policy. Holt, and Holt alone, is responsible for 
the content of "New Voices." 



Registering For Courses 

Although students no longer fill out program schedules 
when registering for courses, an individual can still indicate 
his preference of time and professor. And whenever possi- 
ble, this preference will be honored by the registrar. This 
is the inescapable conclusion of last week's registration. 

A story on the first page explains this situation, but the 
basic procedure is very simple. On the cards which the stu- 
dent fills out to indicate the courses he will be taking, there 
is a place for "Time." Either by writing TTS 9:00 or what- 
ever the desired day and hour on the card, or by going to 
the registrar's office and requesting a specific professor — 
students, for the most part, can still determine their own 
schedules. 



Letter To The Editor 

To the Student Body: 

Bates has many traditions 
which-- are neglected in varying 
degrees by the Bates student 
body. The tradition of which I 
write now is the football rally. 

This brief ceremony occurs on 
Friday evenings in order to give 
moral support to the team. Few, 
I feel, realize what this support 
can do for the team. Whether 
they win or lose is not import- 
ant, although everyone likes to 
have a winning team. Showing 
all the teams, not just football, 
that they have an interested stu- 
dent body behind them is the 
important thing. 

In the past years, the attend- 
ance at these rallies has been 
poor, to say the least. This neg- 
lect is only one more example of 
the apathy of the students with 
which Bates is plagued. 

If the band, cheerleaders, 
majorettes, and those in charge 
of the rally can find the little 
time, usually thirty minutes or 
less, that it takes to be at the 
rally, I fail to see why more of 
the student body cannot make 
time to wish the team good luck 
on the gridiron. 

This year marks the beginning 
of Bates' second century. Let's 
make this year a year for oth- 
ers to follow, in which we show 
our athletes that we appreciate 
them. This demonstration of 
faith is especially important this 
year as there are only two home 
games. The first rally is sched- 
uled for this Friday evening. So 
follow the band around campus 
and put some spirit into the 
rally. — Remember it's your 
team and they would like to see 
you at the rally and the game. 

Kevin Gallagher >64 

Republicans See 
Opportunity For 
Political Action 

(Editor's Note: The following 
is the conclusion of the com- 
mentary about the Young Re- 
publican Club, by Bradford An- 
derson '66.) 

As Freshmen you have most 
certainly been forwarned against 
jumping into extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, which is very sound ad- 
vice. However soon after you are 
settled, you will probably desire 
some other activity to fulfill your 
interests. The Bates College Re- 
publican Club presents just such 
an opportunity. The various proj- 
ects assumed by the club allow 
our members great latitude to ex- 
pend their time according to their 
interest. 

The year 1964 is bringing with 
it the promise of unusual politi- 
cal activities. An excited state of 
affairs will increase as people 
watch a legislative mind assume 
the pace of an executive mind 
and junior executives fancifully 
tailor themselves for a senior 
post. Great will be the occasion 
for individuals to dedicate their 
time and talent for a favorite 
son and a favorite party. 

The week ahead will carry 
tidings of participation by the 
Bates College Republican Club. 
Listen, give yourself the chance 
for a personal choice and then 
act on that decision. Whether or 
not you are inclined toward Re- 
publican politics, you at least 
owe yourself the chance to ex- 
press in deed the hopes and as- 
pirations for an educated, clear 
politic. 



NEW VOICES 

By JOHN HOLT '64 

An Innocuous Introduction, by 
John R. Holt; Bates Student 
Publications; 1 page; by sub- 
scription. 

Baffled by the tongue-in-cheek 
drollery that caps this column? 
Well, you should be! dear read- 
er. I'm reviewing my own book! 
or rather something else. But no 
matter. You must be already 
able to descry some inherent 
possibilities in such a proposi- 
tion. Well, enough of this foolish- 
ness. Let's get serious. 
For in deadly earnestness 
there is always something a 
bit ridiculous . . . Everything 
has its hour of ridicule — ev- 
erything. 

— D. H. Lawrence 
Ahem, not too serious . . . 
With no son of man do I stand 
upon any etiquette or cere- 
mony, except the Christian 
ones of charity and honesty. 

— H. Melville 

All right! All right! Just 
lemme alone! (those quotes can 
get you down after a while, pant 
pant) 
New? 

Now, where were we? Oh yes. 
Centennial year. Volume 90 of 
the STUDENT. "New Voices." 
New name. Old ideas. Older 
writer. Smarter freshman class! 
(pause) "Education (pause) and 
the Role of the Individual" (!) 
Freedom of expression! Equality 
of the races! Equal opportunities 
for women! (only in America) I 
say, let's not take these nebu- 
lous abstracts for granted. Let's 
show the world that we mean 
what we say! (first we run up 
the flag, then take an Indian to 
lunch — we're in) 

... I write exactly as I please. 

— H. M. 

You're bugging me Herm. 

I will be concerned with book 
reviews of 20th century litera- 
ture (all kinds) ; and in addi- 
tion, will dare to write comment- 
ary, (why not?) All venom will 
be contained in a small vial, la- 
ter to be poured in a large vat. 



PERSONAL 

To Dr. Muller: Thank you so 
very much for saving my plant 
from the West Parker fire of last 
July. Despite its proximity to 
the heat, the Dieffenbachia 
Amoena is looking good 

Leon Hurwitz 



LOST AND FOUND 

Lost: One Baldwin article. 
Also missing: one Editor-in-Chief. 

To be found: One Baldwin ar- 
ticle. WATCH THIS COLUMN! 

(Actually, due to lack of space, 
publication of this article is be- 
ing postponed until next week.) 



Ciardi: Portrait 
Of Poet, Critic 

In hopes of attracting more of 
the studentry to campus events, 
the Concert-Lecture Committee 
contracted two outstanding 
speakers for this year's series. 
The first of these men will speak 
on Friday night at 8:00 in the 
Little Theatre, and his name is 
John Ciardi. 

A former Bates student, one 
of his short stories appears in 
the 1935 Garnet. After spending 
a year here, he went to Tufts 
while living at home, and got 
his B.A. from that University in 
1938. 

Ciardi has received degrees, 
awards and honors too numer- 
ous to mention. Of particular 
interest, however, are his posi- 
tions as Poetry Editor of the 
Saturday Review, director of the 
Bread Loaf Writer's Association, 
and host of "Accent", a TV 
discussion program. 

Critic And Scholar 

One of America's better- 
known poets, Ciardi is a recog- 
nized critic and scholar. His 
book How Does a Poem Mean? 
is used widely in colleges and 
his translations of Dante's In- 
ferno and Purgatorio are known 
by every Cultch student. These 
translations are especially noted 
for the accuracy with which they 
have preserved Dante's rhyme 
scheme and mood. 

Ciardi has a deep regard for 
his audience, and quotes in one 
of his books Whitman's "To have 
great poets, there must be great 
audiences too." More specifical- 
ly, Ciardi says "I don't give 
speeches: I talk to the eyes I 
see." It is no wonder that Ciardi 
has acquired a tremendous repu- 
tation as a speaker, and is in 
demand throughout the country. 

Bates students are fortunate 
to have the opportunity of hear- 
ing Ciardi speak about poetry 
and poets. The Concert-Lecture 
Committee anticipates a full 
house for the first event of the 
year. 

Margery Zimmerman 



(This newspaper welcomes let- 
ters from its readers. Any letter 
which does not constitute a per- 
sonal attack or exceed the limits 
of good taste will be published. 
A letter which is not published 
will be acknowledged. All letters 
must be signed. 



Hates 




frucfent 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot '64 Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, Janet McEachern '65, 
Judy Marden. '66, Richard Derby '66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schin- 
del '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Perry Bruder '65. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 

Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during- the college year. Tel. 
783-GGfil. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn. Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewlston Post Office Jan. 30. 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Prese. 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



FIVE 



Sigler Takes Over 
Winning Soccer Team 

By KEITH BOWDEN '64 
During the coming months, many of the students on the 
men's side of campus are likely to encounter a new face in 
the physical education department. It belongs to Roy W. 
Sigler, Jr., the new instructor in physical education, and 
coach of the varsity soccer and golf squads. 

A native of Middletown, Mary-* 
land, Sigler graduated from Frost- 
burg State Teachers College (Md.) 
in 1962, becoming a teacher of 
geography and physical educa- 
tion, as well as soccer and bas- 
ketball coach at Linganere High 
School in Frederick, Md. Dur- 
ing the past summer he was a 
counselor golf and soccer in- 
structor at Camp Menlaoma, 
Kent's Hill, Maine. His appoint- 
ment is for the current year 
where he will bring the staff 
to full strength during the 
sabattical of Dr. Lux's second se- 
mester. 

Sixteen Varsity Letters 

While in college, Sigler won 
16 varsity letters in soccer, golf, 
track, and basketball, and served 
as president of the F.S.T.C. 
Men's Athletic Council. 

In track, he holds his college's 
two mile and a quarter mile re- 
cords. He was named to the All 
South Soccer Team four con- 
secutive years — from 1958-1961; 
was selected on the 1961 NCAA 
All- American Soccer Team; and 
made the finals of the Pan-Amer- 
ican soccer tryouts this past 
year. 

As a college senior he was 
Western Maryland amateur golf 
champion, Frederick, Md., City 
champion, runner-up in the 
Maryland Amateur Golf Cham- 
pionship, and finished 8th in the 
NCAA national golf tournament. 




Coach Sigler 



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Likes College Coaching 

Sigler indicates a desire to re- 
main in coaching at the college 
level, and was very pleased to 
come to Bates. He expressed a 
high regard for the Bates coach- 
ing staff: "After being out of 
college for only one year, com- 
ing to Bates and working with 
this fine staff of coaches is a 
wonderful thing for me. Already 
I've been impressed with the at- 
titude and enthusiasm of this 
year's soccer squad. I hope I can 
give Bates a good team in both 
record and spectator interest, be- 
cause the team has much more 
potential than I thought it 
would." Mr. Sigler indicated the 
squad has a lot of ability and 
should give Bates students some- 
thing to cheer about this sea- 
son. 

Commenting on the game of 
soccer itself, Sigler said he be- 
lieves it will continue to grow 
in popularity as an American 
sport. "Soccer is an economical 
sport, and thanks to TV, more 
people are being exposed to the 
game as it should be played. 
When coaching at the elemen- 
tary level improves, soccer 
should really establish itself in 
America." 



By DON KING '64 

The 1963 intramural football 
season got off to an unofficial 
start Saturday on Page Field, 
as the off campus "Penthouse 
Playboys" exhibited a tremen- 
dous display of power. With a 
gargantuan line averaging well 
over 200 pounds, the Playboy 
powerhouse unmercifully crush- 
ed the defending 1962 champs 
from J. B., 12-0. 

Little Time Wasted 

The Playboys scored on the 
opening play of the contest as 
"Rosy" (and I use this name 
humbly) Whelan, whose vicious 
blocking was savage throughout 
the afternoon, led a terrific rush 
and plucked quarterback Ron 
Vance's pass from the air. He 
took off like a sprinter and 
rolled 20 yards for the score. 
Time had to be called, however, 
as "Rosey" had to catch his 
breath; he still thinks it was at 
least 50 yards. 

Playboys Effective 

The Playboys' final and most 
dramatic score came on a fan- 
tastic play by yours truly, as 
I raced half the field to catch 
up with a 40 yard "Y. A." Wal- 
lach pass in the end zone. I 
might add that "Y. A.'s" per- 
formed admirably in his debut 
at quarterback, as he directed 
each play with certainty and 
finesse. 

The effective running and pas- 
sing attack by the Playboys was 
made possible by the superlative 
blocking of "Big Bad Bobby" 
Belsoff and Gurk "The Golden 
Greek" Basbanes. They teamed 
up to bowl over former football 
star and letterman Jeff Lewis, 
grounding him to the turf play 



after play. 
The "Bloop" 

The "Bloop" (known as Bloom- 
er by his friends), one of the 
cooler heads on and off the grid- 
iron, played his usual superb 
game. His blocking in the back- 
field was excellent as was his 
stellar defensive play. He re- 
minds me to mention that he 
also made a very clever catch 



"Y. A." Wallach pass. Due 



to fleetfooted "Suave Harve's" 
tremendous defensive acumen, 
the defending champs from J. B. 
were able to complete only one 
pass the entire afternoon. 

Neutral Observer 

As a non-partisan reporter, I 
must concede to this overwhel- 
ming, out-of-shape Playboy unit 
the eventual 1963 A league in- 
tramural football championship. 




Bates soccer team scrimmages in preparation for opener 

Soccer Team 



As the soccer team was board- 
ing the bus yesterday to travel 
to Gorham State for a practice 
game, Coach Roy Sigler briefly 
reported the latest on his team's 
merits. He reports that his squad 
has looked fair in the two squad 
scrimmages to date. However, 
the team's spirit and enthusiasm 
are excellent. 

With a lot to do before next 



week's opener, the tentative 
starting lineup as released by 
Coach Sigler is: Onyemelukwe, 
goal; Thompson, Lloyd, full- 
backs; Beebe, center half; Kra- 
mer, left half; Gill, right half; 
Peterson, right wing; Lanz, in- 
side right; Wells, center forward; 
and Capt. Lloyd Bunten, outside 
left. 



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1 



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Catering to Bales Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
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Served — <■ Pizzas — Steaks — 
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777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



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V 



to 

six 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



Norwich Rolls Over Bobcats, 34 - 6 

Bates Eleven Weak Line Play, 
Poor Pass Defense Key To Upset 

By DON DELMORE '64 
The Bobcats traveled to an unfriendly Norwich University Saturday where they suf- 
fered a crushing 34-6 setback in their initial showing of the 1963 football campaign. Bates 
entered the game a slight favorite, but the Cadets unleashed a surprising air attack that 
removed all hopes that the 'Cats might debut successfully. 
First Half Close 




With NICK BASBANES 

All ready, sporls fans? Placing myself on the scaffold, 
I shall make a fearless forecast aboul the World Series open- 
ing in New York today. Even though my more noteworthy 
contempories favor the Yankees by odds of 7-5, I however 
will not succumb to public pressure. I shall hold the line dic- 
tated by my conscience and cheer the Dodgers on to victory, 
for my crystal ball tells me that the gentlemen from L.A. 
will win, and they will win the covered prize (of about ten 
grand per man) in six games. Anyone wishing to discuss the 
possibility of an opposite outcome may find my phone listed 
under the name of my roommate, Bad Bobby Bekoff . 

A brief mention should be made concerning the Bowdoin 
Polar Bears. To the astonishment of many, they drubbed the 
once mighty elephants from Tufts last Saturday 28-6. What's 
ironical about the situation is that Tufts, because they are a 
relatively strong football power, decided last year to drop 
both Bates and Bowdoin, presumably for lack of adequate 
competition. Apparently, no one in their planning depart- 
ment figured that Bowdoin would one day decide to practice 
more than their self-reported art of social finesse. 

Speaking of surprises, not many of us could ever forget 

last year's Bates victory over the Huskies of Northeastern. 
Talk had previously gone about that Northeastern was pon- 
dering the possibility of going big time . . . i. e. . . . 
a process wherein a school increases its power so as to com- 
pete on a higher (athletic) level. And in the midst of all this 
secretive speculation came the 20-6 loss to a team which at 
that time of year had been lightly regarded: the Bobcats. 

A little Bobcat banter . . . Just by talking to a few of 
the Garnet athletes, I see where a good number of them were 
able to keep in condition over the summer. Among the ones 
brought to my attention include Paul Williams, an all-around 
track performer, hurdler Al Harvie, netman Jim Wallach, 
and Cape Cod baseballers, Archie Lanza, Ted Kryznowek, 
and Bill MacNevin. Williams competed in a number of 
meets, capturing in the process, twelve firsts. And Lanza was 
selected to the Cape Cod All-Star team. As for training fa- 
cilities, I was fortunate enough to inspect personally those 
maintained by Bill MacNevin. And I might report, without 
fear of being brought to task, that they were excellent. 

Starting next week, the Sports Staff will begin this year's 
series of the Bobcat of the Week honor. 

Each week's selection depends on the outstanding sporting 
performance of the past week. This includes all activities — 
varsity and junior varsty, female and intra-mural. 

During the past season the preponderance of choices were, 
as to be expected, from varsity performers; but two intra- 
mural champions, one junior varsity and one co-ed perform- 
er, were also Bobcats of the Week. 



Although the final score indi- 
cates a sound trouncing, the 
'Cats held their own with Nor- 
wich throughout the greater 
part of the first half. The Cadets 
struck first on a 31 yard pass 
from junior quarterback Paul 
Nugent to halfback Bob Nolan 
midway through the first period. 
Spillane's successful conversion 
gave Norwich a 7-0 lead. 

Bates fought back to close the 
gap to 7-6 in the second period 
on a one-yard plunge by All- 
State fullback Tom Carr. The 
score was set up by a 30 yard 
pass play from sophomore quar- 
terback Randy Bales to senior 
end Pat Donovan, who carried to 
the six-yard line before finally 
being brought down. Carr 
smashed over from the one, 
four plays later. The conversion 
was missed, and the Cadets 
maintained a lead of one point. 
Minute Of Disaster 

Neither team managed to 
move the ball with any degree of 
success until the final sixty sec- 
onds of the first half. At this 
point, Bates collapsed and the 
Cadets proved to be opportunists 
as they drove for two quick and 
decisive touchdowns. Mike 
Gandley first tallied on a 49-yard 
pass from Nolan. Following an 
interception of a Bobcat aerial 
thirty seconds later, shifty Tony 

SPORTS THIS WEEK 

Friday, October 4 

Cross Country with Colby here 
Saturday, October 5 

Football at Northeastern 
Wednesday, October 9 

Soccer at Nichols 



Campano broke into the clear to 
receive a fifteen yard scoring 
toss from Nugent. These two 
touchdowns in the last minute 
of play resulted in a comfort- 
able lead for Norwich of 19-6 at 
half time. 

Norwich added thirteen more 
points in the second half to run 
their total to thirty-four. The 
Cadets outrushed the 'Cats 240 
yards to 138 yards. They also 
made eleven completions out of 



eighteen passing attempts, good 
for 207 yards, as opposed to the 
46 yards Bates gained through 
the air. It was this passing at- 
tack, triggered behind the strong 
arms of Nugent and Nolan, that 
caught the 'Cats by surprise, 
and paved the way for the un- 
expected upset. It was a tough 
one to lose for the hard-fighting 
Bobcats, who ran into a hot Nor- 
wich squad that took advantage 
of every Bates miscue. 



Hatchmen Seek First Win 
Against Undefeated NE 



NOTICE 
All freshmen and sopho- 
mores interested in writing 
sports for the STUDENT 
should contact either Nick 
Basbanes or any member of 
the staff. Basbanes may be 
reached either through his 
box, 27. or by phoning 
782-4704. 



By LEIGH CAMPBELL '64 

Still smarting from last week's 
34-6 pounding at Norwich, the 
Bates Bobcats will be facing an- 
other rugged test this Saturday 
afternoon. They meet the 
Northeastern Huskies of Coach 
Joe Zabilsky at Brookline, Mass. 
This will be the seventeenth re- 
newal of a rivalry which began 
in 1938. Bates has won nine 
games in the series, Northeast- 
ern seven. Last year, the Bobcats 
pulled a stunning 20-8 upset at 
Garcelon Field. Once again they 
will be the underdogs against a 
strong Husky eleven which 
boasts of twenty lettermen, and 
has beaten Rhode Island and 
Bridgeport in its first two games. 

Against Bridgeport last Satur- 
day, the most impressive mem- 
bers of the Northeastern offense 
which completely dominated 
game statistics were sophomores 
Bob Cappadonna of Watertown 
and Jim Thornton of Brookline. 
Cappadonna, a transfer from 
Notre Dame, weighing 215 
pounds, carried for 77 yards and 
two touchdowns from his full- 
back position. Thornton, a half- 
back, gained 53 yards. 

J.F.K. Hits Frontier 

Northeastern used two quar- 
terbacks in last week's game, in- 
cluding one John F. Kennedy, 



who led a 57-yard drive for 
what proved to be the winning 
score in the fourth period. Paul 
O'Brien also played quarterback 
and led a touchdown march. The 
other member of the starting 
backfield, along with Cappadon- 
na, Kennedy, and Thornton, will 
probably be Dean Webb, a senior 
halfback who was one of North- 
eastern's leading ground-gainers 
last year. 

The Husky line is big, as usual. 
Among the lettermen are Cap- 
tain Joe Davis, a 230-pound tac- 
kle from Brookline. At center 
will be John McPherson, . who is 
also an outstanding pitcher for 
Northeastern's baseball team. 
Place-kicking chores are handled 
by Max St. Victor, a junior from 
Haiti, whose 46-yard field goal 
gave N.U. a 9-6 win over Tufts 
last year. 

Ground Game 

Northeastern stuck mostly to 
the ground against Bridgeport, 
picking up 247 yards on rushing 
plays and only 48 yards passing. 
The Bobcat defenses, it would 
seem, will have to tighten up 
considerably for Bates to bring 
home a victory Saturday. But 
last year's game stands as a good 
example that anything can hap- 
pen in a football game, and the 
'Cats will be out to repeat that 
victory. 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
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24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabattus St. Lewiston 



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50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 

Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a.m.- 10 p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lC p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

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$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
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WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



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Barber Shop 

274 Sabattus Si. Lewiston 
Tel. 782-9010 
Specializing in 
FLAT TOPS 
ALWAYS TWO BARBERS 

Open • Mon.-Sat., 8-5 

Closed Wednesday 



BILL DAVIS says: 

"Your Smoking Headquarters" 
Maine's Most Complete 



PIPES 

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CIGARS 

CIGARETTES 

28 Ash St. Lewiston, Me. 

Tel. 782-8371 
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SAM'S 
Esso Servicenter 

534 Main St. Lewiston. Me. 

To All Bates Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment. 

Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 
Service 



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H>ates 




Stucknt 



Vol. jfc No. 3 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



By Subscription 



Lincoln To Discuss 
Black Muslims 

Speaks Monday 

During the past summer the 
United States has faced possibly 
the greatest racial revolution 
since the Civil War. Feeling it 
important that students become 
aware not only of the basic rac- 
ial issues, the Christian Associa- 
tion has invited Professor C. 
Eric Lincoln, professor of Social 
Relations at Clark College, At- 
lanta, Georgia, to speak next 
Monday night at 8:00 in the Fi- 
lene Room on the rising Black 
Muslim Movement. 

Professor Lincoln, a noted au- 
thority on the Black Muslims, 
has spent several years of study 
in Muslim communities gather- 
ing material for his book, THE 
BLACK MUSLIMS IN AMERI- 
CA. In this time he has met with 
the "Spiritual Head of the Mus- 
lims in the West", Mr. Elijah 
Mujammad, Minister Malcolm 
X of New York City and Minis- 
ter Louis X of Boston and a por- 
tion of the 100,000 other Negroes 
who follow the Muslim Move- 
ment. 

Anti-White 

The Black Muslims are an 
anti-White segment of the Ne- 
gro population which is demand- 
ing that Black men be allowed 
to set up their own independent 
state within the United States. 
Professor Lincoln states in his 
book that "in December, 1960, 
there were sixty-nine temples or 
missions in twenty-seven states, 
from California to Massachusetts 
and Florida. 

Under the leadership of Elijah 
Muhammad, who has been hailed 
by thousands inside and outside 
the Movement as "the most 
fearless Black Man in America" 
the Black Muslims are demand- 
ing — and getting — a hearing 
from a significant element of the 
Negro community." 

The effects of this movement, 
although now quiet in most re- 
spects, may most certainly have 
an important bearing on future 
racial peace in the United States, 
as Professor Lincoln will be ex- 
plaining Monday night in the 
Filene Room to interested Bates 
students. 



Calendar 

Tonight 

Vespers, 9:30 to 10:00 p.m., 
Tomorrow 
Mediterranean Slides, Filene 
Rm. at 6:45 p. m. 
Friday, Oct. 11 
Senior Class Football Rally, 
7:00 p. m. 

Saturday, Oct. 12 
Football with WPI, here, 1:30 
Cross-country with WPI and 

Brandeis, here 
Soccer at Maine 
Monday, Oct. 14 
Primary Elections for Student 
Senate, 8-4 in Alumni Gym 

C. Eric Lincoln speaking on 
"Black Muslims", Filene Rm. 
at 8:00 p.m. 



600 Sympathizers 
March To Protest 
Childrens' Murder 

Three Bates students and two 
faculty members with their 
wives walked down rain - 
drenched Congress Street in 
Portland, two Sundays ago, in 
memory of the tragic church 
bombing that recently took the 
lives of four Negro children in 
Birmingham, Alabama. Approx- 
imately six hundred persons 
walked with them. 

The placard carried in front of 
the marching demonstrators 
read: 

Memorial March, Portland. 
We Are Concerned — Jew- 
ish, Protestant, Catholic and 
All Civic Groups. 

In the Wind and Rain 

The wind-driven downpour 
and the accompanying cold 
didn't seem to bother the silent 
walkers of different faiths and 
races. Respectful and silent too, 
were the onlookers, sitting in 
immobile cars lining both sides 
of the street, standing under- 
neath awnings on the sidewalks, 
staring out of building windows. 
A glance at their eyes told that 
they realized that Portland is 
not so far from Birmingham. 

A monument with a statue of 
a Civil War soldier was passed. 
Underneath it read: "To Her 
Sons Who Died for the Union." 
One thought, just one hundred 
years ago the Emancipation 
Proclamation was signed. 

At Cathedral Hall the march- 
ers listened to addresses by 
Protestant, Catholic, and Jew- 
ish leaders, plus the chairman 
of the Portland City Council. 
Rabbi Harry Z. Sky, perhaps the 
most dynamic of the speakers, 
summed it in the words, "These 
are revolutionary times. Will we 
be known as a free nation, or 
an experiment that failed, be- 
cause we couldn't bring the 
ideals on which we were found- 
ed to fruition?" 




John Ciardi with his former Prof 



Ciardi Stresses Rhythm 
For Understanding Poetry 



Robinson 

Try-outs for some of the 
parts in Henry V will be heard 
tonight and tomorrow in the 
Little Theater. The parts which 
will be heard are Henry, the 
Princess, Charles, Exeter, Chor- 
us, Dauphin, and Alice the 
nurse. These parts are being 
cast now in order that the cos- 
tumes may be completed. 

Actual rehearsals will not be- 
gin for some time. It will thus 
be possible for those also inter- 
ested in the February production 
of Pirandello's Right You Are If 
You Think You Are, to be active 
in both. 

Henry V will be presented 
May 7, 8, and 9, as well as at 
Commencement on June 5th and 
6th. Scripts can be obtained at 
the library and from Miss 
Schaeffer. 



John Ciardi considered the 
way in which poetry should be 
understood before a full Bates 
College chapel audience last Fri- 
day night. In his lecture, he ar- 
gued that poetry must first be 
accepted for its own sake before 
it can be understood. 

One must feel poetry. He il- 
lustrated this point by a quo- 
tation from Robert Frost. "A 
poem begins in delight . . .". Mr. 
Ciardi read some nonsense verse, 
and showed that its rhythm and 
feeling of joy made it poetry. 

Don't Paraphrase 

The reader should not try to 
paraphrase the "meaning" or 
message of a poem. "Statement 
and rhythm are inextricable," he 
contends. They must be "exper- 
ienced" rather than intellectual- 
ized. 



Demands must not be made of 
poetry. The reader responds to 
a poem. He does not ask ques- 
tions of it. He has a significant- 
ly active part to play which Mr. 
Ciardi called "conversing" with 
the poem. 

Read Poetry Aloud 

In emphasizing the rhythm of 
poetry and in his readings, Mr. 
Ciardi reminded his audience 
that it is meant to be performed 
aloud. This facet of a poem's 
beauty is forgotten or passed 
over today. To him it is a, if not 
the, basic quality of poetry. 

Mr. Ciardi's resonant voice and 
assured, but not overbearing 
manner, are well suited to his 
subject. Perhaps the best indica- 
tion of his success is the fact 
that the only question asked of 
him was a request for more poe- 
try. 



Senate Primaries To Be Held 
Monday; Finals A Week Later 



Statistics Uphold 
Concert-Lecture 
Series Decision 

The preponderant question 
asked by Bates students last 
week was — why did the Con- 
cert-Lecture Committee sched- 
ule John Ciardi's lecture in 
the Little Theater? The 
answer is both simple and 
completely rational. 

The lecture was scheduled for 
the Little Theater because only 
eleven per cent went two years 
ago. And since 1958, when twen- 
ty-eight per cent of the students 
attended, there has been a 
steady decline in student attend- 
ance. 

The Little Theater seats 330 
and can hold approximately 350 
persons. The committee had ex- 
pected, on the basis of all avail- 
able information, that this ca- 
pacity would be sufficient. 

When Professor David Wil- 
liams, chairman of the Concert- 
Lecture Series Committee asked 
representatives of the STU- 
DENT and Stu-C, "Do you an- 
ticipate a 50% increase in at- 
tendance, a 100% increase, what 
do you think the increase will 
be?" — he pointed to a relevant 
consideration. For even if stu- 
dent attendance at the Ciardi 
lecture was twice last year's 
figure of eleven per cent, the 
Little Theater would still be 
more than adequate to seat 
everyone. 

Only after the Stu-C and Stu- 
G had polled the students and 
found 434 who said they were 
going, did the Concert-Lecture 
Series Committee have any in- 
dication that the Little Theater 
would not be able to contain the 
audience. 



Air Waves 
Editorials 
New Voices 
Sports 



INDEX 



Page 5 
4 

3 

Pages 6-8 



Tomorrow is the last day that 
candidates may hand in their 
nomination papers for the Stu- 
dent Senate. The primaries, final 
election and the election of a 
president and vice-president will 
be held on the next three Mon- 
days, October 14, 21, and 28. 

The elections will be held 
from 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. on their 
respective days in the gymna- 
sium lobby. Max Steinheimer '66 
is in charge of the balloting. 

The president and vice-presi- 
dent will be chosen from the 
four senior men and four senior 
women on the senate in an all- 
campus election. The secretary 
and treasurer of the senate will 
be of the sophomore or junior 
class and they will be selected 
by the senate at its first meeting. 

The freshmen will vote in 
these elections, but will not 
select their two representatives 
until November. One man and 
one woman will represent the 
freshmen in the Senate. This 
election will be held later than 
the others as it allows the fresh- 
men a longer time to get to know 
the other members of their class. 
Primary elections will be held 



for these positions if needed. 

These elections will mark the 
end of the old Student Council 
and Student Government. This 
change to unified government 
was approved by a student ref- 
erendum last May. It is being 
done to end the duplication of 
effort and lack of coordination 
between the two bodies. 

The Student Senate will give 
more students a .chance to par- 
icipate in their government. In 
conception at least, it will be the 
united voice of the student body 



FROSH DEBATE 

Tryouts for the Freshman 
Debating Squad will be held 
in Room 300, Peliigrew Hall 
at either 4 p. m. or 7 p. m. on 
Thursday, October 10th. 
Candidates may report at 
either time. Each one should 
prepare an original persua- 
sive speech on some phase 
of a controversial topic, last- 
ing from four to five min- 
utes. For further informa- 
tion, see Tom Hall '64, Pres- 
ident of the Debating Coun- 
cil or Professor Quimby in 
Room 308, Pettigrew Hall. 



Chem. Career Panel 
To Be Held Friday 

"Experience teaches" is the 
basis of the career panel on 
Chemistry to be held this Friday 
at 3:00 p.m. in the Women's 
Union. This panel is the first in 
a series of career panels and 
speakers which will be present- 
ed throughout the Centennial 
Year. 

In addition to addressing the 
chapel assembly Friday morning, 
Robert E. Brouillard '38 will 
join three other Bates graduates 
in the afternoon panel discussion 
of careers relating to Chemistry. 
Brouillard is Vice-President in 
charge of Marketing Research at 
Penick and Ford in Westfield, 
N. J. 

Joining him are Dr. Milan A. 
Chapin '32, a physician in Au- 
burn, Maine; Gordon L. Heibert 
'49, Chairman of the Bowdoin 
College Chemistry Department; 
and Frederick J. Martin '37, who 
is in General Electric Research 
at Schenectady, N. Y. 

Students who wish to attend 
— not only Chem majors — will 
be excused from the necessary 
Friday afternoon classes. For 
further details see Dean Healy. 



six 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 2, 1963 



Norwich Rolls Over Bobcats, 34 - 6 

Bates Eleven Weak Line Play, 
Poor Pass Defense Key To Upset 

By DON DELMORE '64 
The Bobcats traveled to an unfriendly Norwich University Saturday where they suf- 
fered a crushing 34-6 setback in their initial showing of the 1963 football campaign. Bates 
entered the game a slight favorite, but the Cadets unleashed a surprising air attack that 
removed all hopes that the 'Cats might debut successfully. 
First Half Close 




With NICK BASBANES 

All ready, sports fans? Placing myself on the scaffold, 
I shall make a fearless forecast aboul the World Series open- 
ing in New York today. Even though my more noteworthy 
contempories favor the Yankees by odds of 7-5, I however 
will not succumb to public pressure. I shall hold the line dic- 
tated by my conscience and cheer the Dodgers on to victory, 
for my crystal ball tells me that the gentlemen from L.A. 
will win, and they will win the covered prize (of about ten 
grand per man) in six games. Anyone wishing to discuss the 
possibility of an opposite outcome may find my phone listed 
under the name of my roommate, Bad Bobby Bekoff . 

A brief mention should be made concerning the Bowdoin 
Polar Bears. To the astonishment of many, they drubbed the 
once mighty elephants from Tufts last Saturday 28-6. What's 
ironical about the situation is that Tufts, because they are a 
relatively strong football power, decided last year to drop 
both Bates and Bowdoin, presumably for lack of adequate 
competition. Apparently, no one in their planning depart- 
ment figured that Bowdoin would one day decide to practice 
more than their self-reported art of social finesse. 

Speaking of surprises, not many of us could ever forget 

last year's Bates victory over the Huskies of Northeastern. 
Talk had previously gone about that Northeastern was pon- 
dering the possibility of going big time . . . i. e. . . . 
a process wherein a school increases its power so as to com- 
pete on a higher (athletic) level. And in the midst of all this 
secretive speculation came the 20-6 loss to a team which at 
that time of year had been lightly regarded: the Bobcats. 

A little Bobcat banter . . . Just by talking to a few of 
the Garnet athletes, I see where a good number of them were 
able to keep in condition over the summer. Among the ones 
brought to my attention include Paul Williams, an all-around 
track performer, hurdler Al Harvie, netman Jim Wallach, 
and Cape Cod baseballers, Archie Lanza, Ted Kryznowek, 
and Bill MacNevin. Williams competed in a number of 
meets, capturing in the process, twelve firsts. And Lanza was 
selected to the Cape Cod All-Star team. As for training fa- 
cilities, I was fortunate enough to inspect personally those 
maintained by Bill MacNevin. And I might report, without 
fear of being brought to task, that they were excellent. 

Starting next week, the Sports Staff will begin this year's 
series of the Bobcat of the Week honor. 

Each week's selection depends on the outstanding sporting 
performance of the past week. This includes all activities — 
varsity and junior varsty, female and intra-mural. 

During the past season the preponderance of choices were, 
as to be expected, from varsity performers; but two intra- 
mural champions, one junior varsity and one co-ed perform- 
er, were also Bobcats of the Week. 



Although the final score indi- 
cates a sound trouncing, the 
'Cats held their own with Nor- 
wich throughout the greater 
part of the first half. The Cadets 
struck first on a 31 yard pass 
from junior quarterback Paul 
Nugent to halfback Bob Nolan 
midway through the first period. 
Spillane's successful conversion 
gave Norwich a 7-0 lead. 

Bates fought back to close the 
gap to 7-6 in the second period 
on a one-yard plunge by All- 
State fullback Tom Carr. The 
score was set up by a 30 yard 
pass play from sophomore quar- 
terback Randy Bales to senior 
end Pat Donovan, who carried to 
the six-yard line before finally 
being brought down. Carr 
smashed over from the one, 
four plays later. The conversion 
was missed, and the Cadets 
maintained a lead of one point. 
Minute Of Disaster 

Neither team managed to 
move the ball with any degree of 
success until the final sixty sec- 
onds of the first half. At this 
point, Bates collapsed and the 
Cadets proved to be opportunists 
as they drove for two quick and 
decisive touchdowns. Mike 
Gandley first tallied on a 49-yard 
pass from Nolan. Following an 
interception of a Bobcat aerial 
thirty seconds later, shifty Tony 

SPORTS THIS WEEK 

Friday, October 4 

Cross Country with Colby here 
Saturday, October 5 

Football at Northeastern 
Wednesday, October 9 

Soccer at Nichols 



Campano broke into the clear to 
receive a fifteen yard scoring 
toss from Nugent. These two 
touchdowns in the last minute 
of play resulted in a comfort- 
able lead for Norwich of 19-6 at 
half time. 

Norwich added thirteen more 
points in the second half to run 
their total to thirty-four. The 
Cadets outrushed the 'Cats 240 
yards to 138 yards. They also 
made eleven completions out of 



eighteen passing attempts, good 
for 207 yards, as opposed to the 
46 yards Bates gained through 
the air. It was this passing at- 
tack, triggered behind the strong 
arms of Nugent and Nolan, that 
caught the 'Cats by surprise, 
and paved the way for the un- 
expected upset. It was a tough 
one to lose for the hard-fighting 
Bobcats, who ran into a hot Nor- 
wich squad that took advantage 
of every Bates miscue. 



Hatchmen Seek First Win 
Against Undefeated NE 



NOTICE 

All freshmen and sopho- 
mores interested in writing 
sports for the STUDENT 
should contact either Nick 
Basbanes or any member of 
the staff. Basbanes may be 
reached either through his 
box, 27. or by phoning 
782-4704. 



By LEIGH CAMPBELL '64 

Still smarting from last week's 
34-6 pounding at Norwich, the 
Bates Bobcats will be facing an- 
other rugged test this Saturday 
afternoon. They meet the 
Northeastern Huskies of Coach 
Joe Zabilsky at Brookline, Mass. 
This will be the seventeenth re- 
newal of a rivalry which began 
in 1938. Bates has won nine 
games in the series, Northeast- 
ern seven. Last year, the Bobcats 
pulled a stunning 20-8 upset at 
Garcelon Field. Once again they 
will be the underdogs against a 
strong Husky eleven which 
boasts of twenty lettermen, and 
has beaten Rhode Island and 
Bridgeport in its first two games. 

Against Bridgeport last Satur- 
day, the most impressive mem- 
bers of the Northeastern offense 
which completely dominated 
game statistics were sophomores 
Bob Cappadonna of Watertown 
and Jim Thornton of Brookline. 
Cappadonna, a transfer from 
Notre Dame, weighing 215 
pounds, carried for 77 yards and 
two touchdowns from his full- 
back position. Thornton, a half- 
back, gained 53 yards. 

J.F.K. Hits Frontier 

Northeastern used two quar- 
terbacks in last week's game, in- 
cluding one John F. Kennedy, 



who led a 57-yard drive for 
what proved to be the winning 
score in the fourth period. Paul 
O'Brien also played quarterback 
and led a touchdown march. The 
other member of the starting 
backfield, along with Cappadon- 
na, Kennedy, and Thornton, will 
probably be Dean Webb, a senior 
halfback who was one of North- 
eastern's leading ground-gainers 
last year. 

The Husky line is big, as usual. 
Among the lettermen are Cap- 
tain Joe Davis, a 230-pound tac- 
kle from Brookline. At center 
will be John McPherson, . who is 
also an outstanding pitcher for 
Northeastern's baseball team. 
Place-kicking chores are handled 
by Max St. Victor, a junior from 
Haiti, whose 46-yard field goal 
gave N.U. a 9-6 win over Tufts 
last year. 
Ground Game 

Northeastern stuck mostly to 
the ground against Bridgeport, 
picking up 247 yards on rushing 
plays and only 48 yards passing. 
The Bobcat defenses, it would 
seem, will have to tighten up 
considerably for Bates to bring 
home a victory Saturday. But 
last year's game stands as a good 
example that anything can hap- 
pen in a football game, and the 
'Cats will be out to repeat that 
victory. 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
Dial 784-8165 Nights 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
Lowest Prices in Town 

TURCOTTE'S 
GARAGE 

Lewiston's Only Radio Dispatch 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabaitus St. Lewiston 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 
Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a. xn.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

Nearest the College 

$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
ROOM LOUNGE 
TeL 784-5491 



FERN'S 
TAXI 



784-5469 



.; Louis P. Nolin :. 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 

Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



SMITT Y'S 
Barber Shop 

274 Sabattus St. Lewiston 
Tel. 782-9010 
Specializing in 
FLAT TOPS 
ALWAYS TWO BARBERS 

Open - Mon.-Sai., 8-5 

Closed Wednesday 



BILL DAVIS says: 

"Your Smoking Headquarters" 
Maine's Most Complete 

Assortment 
PIPES 

TOBACCOS 
CIGARS 

CIGARETTES 
28 Ash St. Lewiston, Me. 
Tel. 782-8371 



SAM'S 

Esso Servicenter 

534 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

To All Bates Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment. 

Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 
Service 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 

Diamonds - Watch Repairing 




50 Lisbon Street Dial 784-5241 




Student 



Vol. #C, No. 3 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



By Subscription 



Lincoln To Discuss 
Black Muslims 

Speaks Monday 

During the past summer the 
United States has faced possibly 
the greatest racial revolution 
since the Civil War. Feeling it 
important that students become 
aware not only of the basic rac- 
ial issues, the Christian Associa- 
tion has invited Professor C. 
Eric Lincoln, professor of Social 
Relations at Clark College, At- 
lanta, Georgia, to speak next 
Monday night at 8:00 in the Fi- 
lene Room on the rising Black 
Muslim Movement. 

Professor Lincoln, a noted au- 
thority on the Black Muslims, 
has spent several years of study 
in Muslim communities gather- 
ing material for his book, THE 
BLACK MUSLIMS IN AMERI- 
CA. In this time he has met with 
the "Spiritual Head of the Mus- 
lims in the West", Mr. Elijah 
Mujammad, Minister Malcolm 
X of New York City and Minis- 
ter Louis X of Boston and a por- 
tion of the 100,000 other Negroes 
who follow the Muslim Move- 
ment. 

Anti-While 

The Black Muslims are an 
anti-White segment of the Ne- 
gro population which is demand- 
ing that Black men be allowed 
to set up their own independent 
state within the United States. 
Professor Lincoln states in his 
book that "in December, 1960, 
there were sixty-nine temples or 
missions in twenty-seven states, 
from California to Massachusetts 
and Florida. 

Under the leadership of Elijah 
Muhammad, who has been hailed 
by thousands inside and outside 
the Movement as "the most 
fearless Black Man in America" 
the Black Muslims are demand- 
ing — and getting — a hearing 
from a significant element of the 
Negro community." 

The effects of this movement, 
although now quiet in most re- 
spects, may most certainly have 
an important bearing on future 
racial peace in the United States, 
as Professor Lincoln will be ex- 
plaining Monday night in the 
Filene Room to interested Bates 
students. 



Calendar 

Tonight 

Vespers, 9:30 to 10:00 p.m., 
Tomorrow 
Mediterranean Slides, Filene 
Rm. at 6:45 p. m. 
Friday, Oct. 11 
Senior Class Football Rally, 
7:00 p.m. 

Saturday, Oct. 12 
Football with WPI, here, 1:30 
Cross-country with WPI and 

Brandeis, here 
Soccer at Maine 

Monday, Oct. 14 
Primary Elections for Student 

Senate, 8-4 in Alumni Gym 
C. Eric Lincoln speaking on 

"Black Muslims", Filene Rm. 

at 8:00 p. m. 



600 Sympathizers 
March To Protest 
Childrens' Murder 

Three Bates students and two 
faculty members with their 
wives walked down rain - 
drenched Congress Street in 
Portland, two Sundays ago, in 
memory of the tragic church 
bombing that recently took the 
lives of four Negro children in 
Birmingham, Alabama. Approx- 
imately six hundred persons 
walked with them. 

The placard carried in front of 
the marching demonstrators 
read: 

Memorial March, Portland. 
We Are Concerned — Jew- 
ish, Protestant, Catholic and 
All Civic Groups. 

In the Wind and Rain 

The wind-driven downpour 
and the accompanying cold 
didn't seem to bother the silent 
walkers of different faiths and 
races. Respectful and silent too, 
were the onlookers, sitting in 
immobile cars lining both sides 
of the street, standing under- 
neath awnings on the sidewalks, 
staring out of building windows. 
A glance at their eyes told that 
they realized that Portland is 
not so far from Birmingham. 

A monument with a statue of 
a Civil War soldier was passed. 
Underneath it read: "To Her 
Sons Who Died for the Union." 
One thought, just one hundred 
years ago the Emancipation 
Proclamation was signed. 

At Cathedral Hall the march- 
ers listened to addresses by 
Protestant, Catholic, and Jew- 
ish leaders, plus the chairman 
of the Portland City Council. 
Rabbi Harry Z. Sky, perhaps the 
most dynamic of the speakers, 
summed it in the words, "These 
are revolutionary times. Will we 
be known as a free nation, or 
an experiment that failed, be- 
cause we couldn't bring the 
ideals on which we were found- 
ed to fruition?" 



Robinson 

Try-outs for some of the 
parts in Henry V will be heard 
tonight and tomorrow in the 
Little Theater. The parts which 
will be heard are Henry, the 
Princess, Charles, Exeter, Chor- 
us, Dauphin, and Alice the 
nurse. These parts are being 
cast now in order that the cos- 
tumes may be completed. 

Actual rehearsals will not be- 
gin for some time. It will thus 
be possible for those also inter- 
ested in the February production 
of Pirandello's Right You Are If 
You Think You Are, to be active 
in both. 

Henry V will be presented 
May 7, 8, and 9, as well as at 
Commencement on June 5th and 
6th. Scripts can be obtained at 
the library and from Miss 
Schaeffer. 




John Ciardi with his former Prof 



Ciardi Stresses Rhythm 
For Understanding Poetry 



John Ciardi considered the 
way in which poetry should be 
understood before a full Bates 
College chapel audience last Fri- 
day night. In his lecture, he ar- 
gued that poetry must first be 
accepted for its own sake before 
it can be understood. 

One must feel poetry. He il- 
lustrated this point by a quo- 
tation from Robert Frost. "A 
poem begins in delight . . .". Mr. 
Ciardi read some nonsense verse, 
and showed that its rhythm and 
feeling of joy made it poetry. 

Don't Paraphrase 

The reader should not try to 
paraphrase the "meaning" or 
message of a poem. "Statement 
and rhythm are inextricable," he 
contends. They must be "exper- 
ienced" rather than intellectual- 
ized. 



Demands must not be made of 
poetry. The reader responds to 
a poem. He does not ask ques- 
tions of it. He has a significant- 
ly active part to play which Mr. 
Ciardi called "conversing" with 
the poem. 

Read Poetry Aloud 

In emphasizing the rhythm of 
poetry and in his readings, Mr. 
Ciardi reminded his audience 
that it is meant to be performed 
aloud. This facet of a poem's 
beauty is forgotten or passed 
over today. To him it is a, if not 
the, basic quality of poetry. 

Mr. Ciardi's resonant voice and 
assured, but not overbearing 
manner, are well suited to his 
subject. Perhaps the best indica- 
tion of his success is the fact 
that the only question asked of 
him was a request for more poe- 
try. 



Senate Primaries To Be Held 
Monday; Finals A Week Later 



Statistics Uphold 
Concert-Lecture 
Series Decision 

The preponderant question 
asked by Bates students last 
week was — why did the Con- 
cert-Lecture Committee sched- 
ule John Ciardi's lecture in 
the Little Theater? The 
answer is both simple and 
completely rational. 

The lecture was scheduled for 
the Little Theater because only 
eleven per cent went two years 
ago. And since 1958, when twen- 
ty-eight per cent of the students 
attended, there has been a 
steady decline in student attend- 
ance. 

The Little Theater seats 330 
and can hold approximately 350 
persons. The committee had ex- 
pected, on the basis of all avail- 
able information, that this ca- 
pacity would be sufficient. 

When Professor David Wil- 
liams, chairman of the Concert- 
Lecture Series Committee asked 
representatives of the STU- 
DENT and Stu-C, "Do you an- 
ticipate a 50% increase in at- 
tendance, a 100% increase, what 
do you think the increase will 
be?" — he pointed to a relevant 
consideration. For even if stu- 
dent attendance at the Ciardi 
lecture was twice last year's 
figure of eleven per cent, the 
Little Theater would still be 
more than adequate to seat 
everyone. 

Only after the Stu-C and Stu- 
G had polled the students and 
found 434 who said they were 
going, did the Concert-Lecture 
Series Committee have any in- 
dication that the Little Theater 
would not be able to contain the 
audience. 



Air Waves 
Editorials 
New Voices 
Sports 



INDEX 



Page 5 
4 
3 

Pages 6-8 



Tomorrow is the last day that 
candidates may hand in their 
nomination papers for the Stu- 
dent Senate. The primaries, final 
election and the election of a 
president and vice-president will 
be held on the next three Mon- 
days, October 14, 21, and 28. 

The elections will be held 
from 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. on their 
respective days in the gymna- 
sium lobby. Max Steinheimer '66 
is in charge of the balloting. 

The president and vice-presi- 
dent will be chosen from the 
four senior men and four senior 
women on the senate in an all- 
campus election. The secretary 
and treasurer of the senate will 
be of the sophomore or junior 
class and they will be selected 
by the senate at its first meeting. 

The freshmen will vote in 
these elections, but will not 
select their two representatives 
until November. One man and 
one woman will represent the 
freshmen in the Senate. This 
election will be held later than 
the others as it allows the fresh- 
men a longer time to get to know 
the other members of their class. 
Primary elections will be held 



for these positions if needed. 

These elections will mark the 
end of the old Student Council 
and Student Government. This 
change to unified government 
was approved by a student ref- 
erendum last May. It is being 
done tS end the duplication of 
effort and lack of coordination 
between the two bodies. 

The Student Senate will give 
more students a chance to par- 
icipate in their government. In 
conception at least, it will be the 
united voice of the student body. 



FROSH DEBATE 

Tryouts for the Freshman 
Debating Squad will be held 
in Room 300, Pettigrew Hall 
at either 4 p. m. or 7 p. m. on 
Thursday, October 10th. 
Candidates may report at 
either time. Each one should 
prepare an original persua- 
sive speech on some phase 
of a controversial topic, last- 
ing from four to five min- 
utes. For further informa- 
tion, see Tom Hall '64, Pres- 
ident of the Debating Coun- 
cil or Professor Quimby in 
Room 308. Pettigrew Hall. 



Chem. Career Panel 
To Be Held Friday 

"Experience teaches" is the 
basis of the career panel on 
Chemistry to be held this Friday 
at 3:00 p.m. in the Women's 
Union. This panel is the first in 
a series of career panels and 
speakers which will be present- 
ed throughout the Centennial 
Year. 

In addition to addressing the 
chapel assembly Friday morning, 
Robert E. Brouillard '38 will 
join three other Bates graduates 
in the afternoon panel discussion 
of careers relating to Chemistry. 
Brouillard is Vice-President in 
charge of Marketing Research at 
Penick and Ford in Westfield, 
N. J. 

Joining him are Dr. Milan A. 
Chapin '32, a physician in Au- 
burn, Maine; Gordon L. Heibert 
'49, Chairman of the Bowdoin 
College Chemistry Department; 
and Frederick J. Martin '37, who 
is in General Electric Research 
at Schenectady, N. Y. 

Students who wish to attend 
— not only Chem majors — will 
be excused from the necessary 
Friday afternoon classes. For 
further details see Dean Healy. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



Forensic Forecasts 

By SUSAN STANLEY '64 
Up there in Quimby Quorner 
opposite Room 300 in Pettigrew 
Hall, there are rumors of strange 
goings-on — lights on late at 
night, loud noises, people gesti- 
culating wildly. FORENSIC 
FORECASTS is here to assure 
the campus that this is, in truth, 
a very rational segment of Bates 
life. It is, in fact, the home-away - 
from home of the Bates debaters. 

To many of you debating is 
probably a nebulous word, gen- 
erally associated with a hazy 
idea of considerable speech-mak- 
ing. During this year — debat- 
ing, exactly what it is, how it 
is done, and who does it — will 
hopefully be explained. The 
STUDENT will carry the news 
of the club's activities, and at 
the same time to make debating, 
and the role Bates plays, more 
understandable to the reader. 

H. S. Clinic Saturday 

This Saturday the Bates In- 
terscholastic Debating League 
will hold the annual Discussion 
Contest and Debate Clinic at the 
New Hampton School in New 
Hampshire. Eleven New Hamp- 
shire schools have joined the 
League thus far this year. 

This program is held to give 
high school debaters an oppor- 
tunity to practice speaking and 
to watch a college debate. A 
coaches' conference is scheduled 
at which Prof. Quimby will ex- 
plain the activities provided by 
the League for the high schools. 
Social Security Benefits 

The exhibition debate by 
Bates will be on the high school 
topic: Resolved: that social se- 
curity benefits should be extend- 
ed to include complete medical 
care. Defending the proposal on 
the affirmative will be Richard 
Rosenblatt '66 and Robert Boyd 
'64, and opposing them on the 
negative will be Morris Lely- 
veld '64 and Norman Bowie '64. 

The debaters will be accom- 
panied by Prof. Quimby and 
Thomas Hall '64 president of the 
Debate Club. 

This same Discussion and De- 
bate Clinic will be held for the 
Maine high schools on Novem- 
ber 9, when the Maine branch of 
the Bates Interscholastic Debat- 
ing League celebrates its 50th 
anniversary. 



Dean Healy Outlines 
Junior Year Program 

The Bates Junior- Year Abroad 
Program was the basis of a brief 
talk by Dean Healy in the Chap- 
el last Friday. The talk, aimed 
at freshmen and interested soph- 
omores, sketched the principles 
and organization behind the 
Bates Plan. 

The Dean said that interested 
students "must be substantially 
within the upper half of their 
class," so that the academic 
work would not prove excessive 
in Europe. The European uni- 
versities can select but a small 
percentage of all students who 
apply. 

Maintaining that a keen, in- 
quiring frame of mind is essen- 
tial to success, Dean Healy said, 
"The full reward of this experi- 
ence will not come just in the 
act of doing it. There must be 
a vigorous participation in the 
program." 

"Spending the junior year 
abroad has suddenly become 
very fashionable and exciting," 
Healy pointed out. "In the last 



WCBB Features 



Tonight 

8:00 LYRICS AND LEGENDS 

— "Sea Songs." Filmed at 
the famous old seaport in 
Mystic, Connecticut, this 
program tells about Amer- 
ican sailing vessels. 

8:30 SOURT OF REASON — 

A critical examination of 
both sides of a controver- 
sial question. 

9:30 AT ISSUE — A half-hour 
exploration of vital, unre- 
solved controversies of the 
day. 

Tomorrow Night 

7:30 FOCUS ON BEHAVIOR — 

"A World to Perceive." 
Concepts, methods and 
new advances in the scien- 
tific study of behavior. 



8:00 SCIENCE REPORTER — 

"Sounding the Ocean." 
Discover what is being 
done in research to un- 
derstand the ocean. 
9:00 THE OPEN MIND — An 
hour long weekly presen- 
tation of public affairs pro- 
grams. 

Friday Night 

8:00 ART OF SEEING — 

World-famed photographer 
Ernst Haas explains the 
difference between photog- 
raphy and other arts. 
8:30 SAN FRANCISCO SYM- 
PHONY under the direc- 
tion of Enrique Jorda per- 
forms works by Ralph 
Vaughan Williams, Guido 
Turchi, and Franz Josef 
Haydn. 



few years the number of stu- 
dents applying has increased 
three or four hundred percent." 

The program has caught on so 
well that one hundred applica- 
tions were received in the last 
year. However, Bates will con- 



tinue its policy of recommend- 
ing only a few to any one uni- 
versity in order not to flood 
them with unwanted applica- 
tions. This will mean intensive 
screening for the individual 
candidate. 



Guidance 

PEACE CORPS TEST 

The next Peace Corps Place- 
ment Test has been scheduled 
for October 19 at 8:30 in the 
Lewiston Post Office. Prospec- 
tive volunteers should make note 
of this. , 
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

THE AMERICAN RED CROSS 
has recently announced chal- 
lenging opportunities for young 
men and women college gradu- 
ates to serve domestically as 
well as overseas in the fields of 
social work, recreation, counsel- 
ing, nursing, first aid and water 
safety. Further descriptive in- 
formation is available in the 
Guidance and Placement Office. 

AMERICAN HEARING SO- 
CIETY — Any inquiries for in- 
formation about training centers 
or financial aids in working with 
the deaf or hard of hearing as 
well as information on training 
for teachers of the deaf, audi- 
ologists or speech therapists 
should be addressed to: Ameri- 
can Hearing Society, 919 18th 
Street, N. W., Washington 6, 



Progress in the Bell System.. . 



WALK, DON'T RUN 
All student* interested in 
writing for the STUDENT 
should come to the newt- 
paper office this Sunday be- 
tween 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. 
At thai time, a member of 
the Editorial Board will be 
available to answer ques- 
tions. The STUDENT office 
is located on the street 
floor of Parker Hall — 
ter rear entrance. 



+ 



+ 



"HOTEL HOLLY' 



IN MAINE 
Main Street Lewiston 

+ + 



LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 

DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 

- Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 




AND LIVES AND BREATHES... 

Progress takes many shapes in the Bell System. And among 
the shapers are young men, not unlike yourself, impatient 
to make things happen for their companies and themselves. 
There are few places where such restlessness is more wel- 
comed or rewarded than in the fast-growing phone business. 



Bell Telephone Companies 




BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



THREE 



Comment On Ciardi All 
God's Chillun Got Rhythm 



In his book Art as Experience, 
John Dewey speaks of rhythm as 
the basic condition of life. In our 
hungers and their satisfaction, in 
life and death, there is a struggle 
to reach an equilibrium. This 
rhythm is active, and each time 
the human organism reaches a 
"stable, even though moving, 
equilibrium", it has also grown 
to encompass and understand 
more of the world around it. 

This balance "comes about not 
mechanically and inertly but out 
of, and because of tension". This 
common biological facl is ai the 
very base of esthetic and of all 
experience. 

John Ciardi came to Bates last 
Friday evening to tell us of the 
vast integral importance of 
sound and rhythm in poetry. He 
spoke from an academic stand- 
point (he has taught at Har- 
vard, Rutgers and is now at 
Tufts), but against the common 
academic grain. 

When you say something in 
words other than those of the 
poem, you may be saying some- 
thing good and worthwhile, but 
what you're saying is not the 
poem. You have lost the poem's 
rhythm and its language. 

But this is commonly what is 
done in the classroom — ab- 
straction. Not only poetry, but 
many ideas we come in contact 
with and believe to be true are 
treated as though they are in 
a vacuum or a glass case and 
really have nothing to do with 
us. In this way, a classroom is a 




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kind of museum. 

Ciardi was not saying anything 
new about poetry. Rather, he 
was reminding us of something 
we have forgotten or lost. This 
sense of rhythm which is so 
basic to life seems to have dis- 
appeared. 

To be in rhythm means to be 
involved. It means to be experi- 
encing in the largest, often 
most painful sense of the word. 
It means, as Dewey says, to be 
growing. A human being must 
be active in this way because 
anything static is foreign to life 
itself. 

But if we abstract, if we place 
poems, ideas, experience of all 
kinds somewhere where we can 
look but never be in danger of 
touching or being touched, how 
can we grow? If we don't have 
a sense of involvement, we are 
morally and spiritually dead. 

This in fact is the message of 

one of America's young authors. 

James Baldwin speaks of "the 

beat" in his novel Another 

Country. "It was to remember 

the beat: 'A nigger', said his 

father 'lives his whole life, lives 

and dies according to a beat. The 

beat: hands, feet, tambourines, 

drums, pianos, laughter, curses 
it 

The implication of this quote, 
and the statement of the novel 
is that Americans have lost, or 
are in grave danger of losing all 
sense of this beat — his rhythm. 
We are out of tune, and the re- 
sultant discord is a meaningless 
clash of cross -purposes and 
blind gropings. 

Mr. Ciardi intoned his verse 
in much the same manner that 
a Homeric bard must have done. 
He was trying to say something 
about poetry. He wants it to re- 
gain its "primitive wildness" 
which is its rhythm. But that 
will only come if we regain a 
feeling of this element in our 



^feW VOICED 



By JOHN HOLT '64 



THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



| Ritz Theatre 

| Thurs, FrL, Sat.. 

I "PT 109" 

i Cliff Robertson 
| Ty Hardin 

James Gregory 
Robert Culp 
Grant Williams 
Lew Gallo 
Errol John 
Michael Pate 
Robert Blake 
Biff Elliott 
Norman Fell 

William Douglas 
- and - 

"The Story of 
I Monte Cristo" I 

| — Closed Wednesdays — | 



Pan, by Knut Hamsun; Noonday 
Paperbacks; 192 pp.; $1.25. 

In 1952, one of Europe's most 
significant writers died. He re- 
ceived the Nobel prize for liter- 
ature in 1920. And yet, who out- 
side of a few, ever talks about 
the works of Knut Hamsun? 

One of his admirers was 
Thomas Mann. In his essay, "The 
Artist and Society," Mann com- 
ments: 

"In our own days we have a 
fascinating case of conserva- 
tive or, if you will, reaction- 
ary, social criticism, placed 
in the most refined and artis- 
tically advanced setting,, in 
the person of the late Knut 
Hamsun — an apostate of 
liberalism, formatively influ- 
enced by Dostoievski and 
Nietzsche, filled with hatred 
for civilization, for city life, 
intellectualism and all that 
sort of thing . . ." 

Since I think it important (I 
will not make the mistake of 
calling myself an objective re- 
viewer — for the simple reason 
that it is impossible — so you 
can expect a few references to 
that very personal pronoun — I), 
a view into Greek mythology 
may help us to understand Ham- 
sun's work, and Pan in particu- 
lar. 

Gods Despise Pan 

According to Robert Graves, 
Pan was, "on the whole, easy- 
going and lazy, loving nothing 
better than his afternoon sleep, 
and revenged himself on those 
who disturbed him with a sud- 
den loud shout from a grove or 
grotto, which made the hair 
bristle on their heads. . . . The 
Olympian gods, while despising 
Pan for his simplicity and love 
of riot, exploited his powers. . . . 
Pan boasted that he had coupled 
with all of Dionysus' drunken 
Maenads. . . . Pan is the only god 
who has died in our time. . . ." 

To read Pan on Hamsun's own 
terms, which you must, it will do 
well to give your mind and 
imagination free reign. The story 
is an idyllic fantasia, but a fan- 
tasia that is often disturbed 
from outside, and this disturb- 
ance makes Pan a destroyer, 
both of himself and others. 



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if 



IF A MAN 
ANSWERS 

■ with - 
Bobby Darin 
Sandra Dee 



The Northern Woods 

Thomas Glahn is the Pan of 
the Northern woods. He hunts, 
so that he can live in the forest. 
He dreams — but he dreams of 
the hot-blood passion of um- 
brageous nymphs. 

"Then her loud and happy 
laughter sounds through the 
forest and she walks away 
from him, exhulting and sin- 
ful from head to foot. And 
where does she go? To the 
next one, a hunter in the for- 
est." 

With the dreams of Glahn, 
Hamsun creates a kind of coun- 
terpuntal rhythms, where mythic 
fantasy overlaps the human, per- 
verted reality that is here the 
effect of the codes of civilization. 

Glahn is infused with irra- 
tional amorality that overpow- 
ers and fascinates women. There 
seems to be a force that controls 
him — and that he has no con- 
trol over actions of consequence. 
He is ill at ease and clumsy in 
social situations. Ceremony and 
protocol mean nothing. He lives 
only in the sensual world of 
color and rhythm, of sound and 
impulse. His heart is "full of 
dark wine.' His primitive eyes 
elicit fear yet compel inelectable 
involvement. 

Scheming Female 

The character of Edvarda is an 
enigmatic one. She is the spoiled 
child of a rich man who owns 
the forest. She is "irrational and 
calculating at the same time." 
Fascinated by Glahn, she toys 
with his soul; she plays the 
nymph, and then capriciously 
leaves him. The pride and honor 
of Glahn react strongly, and his 
hunger, frustrated, becomes the 
source of a sado-masochistic de- 
sire to annihilate and to hurt. 
He comes to destroy the only 
person he loves, Eva, "... the 
wild child of life itself", al- 
though he does not will it. 

Throughout Glahn's stay in the 
forest, he is met with an intrud- 
ing "civilized element" that re- 
acts to his philosophy. This is 
met in the person of Edvarda 's 
father, who is the extreme in op- 
position to Glahn. Eventually, 
he succeeds in driving Glahn 
from the forest, priding himself 
in conquering such an indomi- 
table spirit. 

Possession Forces Hate 

Ending the story thus, we see 
Edvarda and Glahn in mutual 
hatred, because they have hurt 
each other in the most sacred 
spot. Glahn's honor and pride 
has been played with, Edvarda's 
affected aristocracy and capri- 
cious spirit has been held in 
contempt. Not as pure as Eva, 
she wishes to know and control 



'The Fire Next Time' 
A Universal Essay 

"Perhaps the whole root of 
our trouble, the human trouble, 
is that we will sacrifice all the 
beauty of our lives, will im- 
prison ourselves in totems, ta- 
boos, crosses, blood sacrifices, 
steeples, mosques, races, armies, 
flags, nations, in order to deny 
the fact of death, which is the 
only fact we have." 

The original intention to "con- 
sider specifically what Baldwin 
writes about love and hate, and 
the moral inferiority of the 
white man" has been forsaken. 
For James Baldwin is much 
more than a Negro writing about 
his race. In these quotations, and 
throughout The Fire Next Time, 
he demonstrates that his vision 
is not confined to a specific prob- 
lem, but is universal. 

To avoid death, Baldwin 
writes, 

love is so desperately sought 
and so cunningly avoided. Love 
takes off the masks thai we fear 
we cannot live without and 
know we cannot live within. I 
use the word "love" here not 
merely in the personal sense but 
as a state of being, or a state of 
grace — not in the infantile 
American sense of being made 
happy but in the tough and 
universal sense of quest and 
daring and growth. 

"That man who is forced each 
day to snatch his manhood, his 
identity, out of the fire of hu- 
man cruelty that rages to 
destroy it, knows something 
about himself and human life 
that no school on earth — and, 
indeed, no church — can teach. 
He achieves his own authority, 
and that is unshakable." 

To read The Fire Next Time 
takes little more than an hour. 

Glahn — and this he will not al- 
low — because his soul is sov- 
ereign. 

A Broken Idyll 

Glahn leaves, mourning the 
broken idyll, and ready to wan- 
der in his melancholy to try and 
repair the damage done to him. 
Hamsun adds to the novel a short 
piece called "Glahn's Death", 
which is narrated by another 
hunter, and tells of Glahn living 
like Gauguin among the primi- 
tives of an equatorial jungle. He 
dies, in response to a death-wish, 
by a bullet in his head. 
Stranger in Solitude 

Like Camus' Meursault, Glahn 
is somewhat of a "stranger." He 
says: "I belong to the forest and 
the solitude." He is not at home 
in the civilized world, and seeks 
to avoid it and live primitively. 
Hamsun's use of the dream and 
Nordic myth brings the story of 
the Dionysian Maenads to a 
pitch of understanding. The 
sexual allusions and overtones 
do not seem perverse but biolo- 
(Continued on page five) 



"Kid Gallahad" 

- with - 
Elvis Presley 



GOT 9 FRIENDS? 

THEN THIS CALLS FOR A HOUSE OF HAY 
HOOTENANNY! 

For this, you order 10 Kentucky Fried Chicken Snack 
Packs (2 pieces finger lickin' good chicken — french 
fries), only 75c each. Then stomp and chew all nightl 
FREE Delivery on Orders of 10 or more 
Snack Packs to Bates Students in October 

Phone 784-4079 
House of Hay Take Home 

700 LISBON STREET 
LEWISTON 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



Editorials 



I The Racial Dilemma 

There can be only one ultimate solution to the racial dilem- 
ma which engulfs this country — a change in the heart and 
mind of every American. Legislation, no matter how sweep- 
ing, cannot erase the discrimination which persists as part of 
an individual's thinking. 

Consider the college co-ed who is asked for a date by a 
student, whom she thinks is "perfectly horrible." Yet, be- 
cause the boy is negro, she feels that she must not say No. 

It is this identification of an indivdual as non-white — see- 
ing not another person, but another color — that must be 
overcome. 

Yet, those who hope to erase racial distinctions from in- 
dividual thoughts and feelings are caught in a necessary di- 
lemma. For only by protests and demonstrations to make 
"white Americans" color-conscious, can they hope 1 to erase 
the social structure which is based on color. 

The struggle to overcome identification by color must be 
waged at the lunch counters, and the construction sites, and 
in the school room, to make people aware that they are color.- 
conscious. For only by making him realize the historical and 
environmental attitudes which he has inherited, can the 
"white man's" discrimination be overcome. 

But, lest he forget that it is the abolition of discrimination 
based on color which is his goal, the Negro and his support- 
ers must remember that they are caught in a dilemma. To 
suggest quota systems for the number of Negro workers on a 
job, or the number of white students in a school, is to in- 
stitutionalize the very color-consciousness that the negro 
must hope to eradicate. 

Only by acting with an awareness of his eventual goal can 
the Negro pursue a successful civil rights campaign. Only 
by overcoming the institutionalization of color-consciouness 
can America succeed. 



The Concert-Lecture Series 

More than four hundred -fifty students enjoyed John 
Ciardi's lecture last Friday evening, but not before repre- 
sentatives of the STUDENT, the Stu-C, and Stu-G had acted 
to convince members of the committee planning the lecture 
that the Little Theater would not contain everyone who was 
planning to attend. 

In fact, it was only by polling the students and finding 
more than four hundred who were definitely planning to at- 
tend, that the decision was made to re-locate Ciardi's lecture 
in the chapel. 

The students, however, have no one to blame but them- 
selves for the apparently poor judgment of the Concert-Lec- 
ture Series Committee. The steady decline in student attend- 
ance over the past five years has repeatedly embarrassed 
those who have planned the lectures and those few who have 
attended them. The chapel is indeed a "barn" when only 
two hundred persons come to hear a lecture. And the blame 
or explanation is not to be found in the lack of quality speak- 
ers. The audience for Max Lerner would not have filled the 
Little Theater. » 

Facts must be faced, and this is precisely what the commit- 
tee did. Unanimously, student and faculty members decided 
to schedule this year's lectures for the Little Theater. 

Students are not interested in listening to lectures. The 
average attendance was less than 1/3 of the studentry, when 
the series was instituted, and last year barely 1/9 attended 
the lectures. Only 56% ( of the students listened to Lord Atlee, 
in the best attended lecture since the beginning of the series 
in 1958. 

We think it unfortunate that more students do not include 
these lectures as part of their education, but to the extent 
that they do, the series will accommodate them. 



"Bates 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot '64 Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, Steve Adams '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
'66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-0661. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



Letter To The Editor 

To the Editor: 

"When they get their rights, 
then maybe they will not be so 
eager to push in amongst the 
white people and will be satis- 
fied to stay with their own 
kind!" 

This assertion, made not long 
ago by a student is so typical 
of "White Americans", that I 
want to point out a serious mis- 
understanding of fact that is re- 
vealed in the phrase "with their 
own kind". 

In the first place, the "Amer- 
ican Negro" is not "a distinct 
race", quite separate from the 
rest of the population. Even in 
Africa, many of the Negroid 
peoples have a great deal of 
"white" ancestry, which goes 
back to the time when the Sa- 
hara was forming (2000 to 5000 
years ago): its originally fertile 
plains fed millions of Mediter- 
raneans, many of whom went 
south as their land gradually 
dried up. 

In America, when slavery pre- 
vailed, "race mixture" was fre- 
quent. One of thhe best Lincoln 
stories tells how a Southerner 
was insisting on the gulf be- 
tween Blacks and Whites. Lin- 
coln listened patiently for a 
while, and then ended the dis- 
cussion with a question, "Do 
you mean to say, sir, that these 
millions of Mulattoes were sired 
by Northern abolitionists?" 

It is not necessary to be a 
trained anthropologist to see 
that "colored people" have part- 
ly "white" ancestry: it is com- 
monly estimated that 75% of 
them do. Many of them have 
some American Indian ancestry 
also. Furthermore, this mixing is 
not just something that hap- 
pened "long ago": it is still fairly 
frequent. 

The Ph.D. thesis of a South- 
ern college president (himself 
a white Southerner) discusses 
the fact that one obstacle to "so- 
cial" integration is that so many 
white Southerners know that 
they have illegitimate half- 
brothers and sisters who are 
"colored". The white Southern- 
ers can half forget this as long 
as there is no "social mixing". 
(It is encouraging that a South- 
erner who wrote such "heresey" 
can be a college president in the 
South. 

And culturally there is little 
that distinguishes U.S. Negroes 
from Whites of their class and 
region. The chief cultural item 
that does, in part, go back to 
Africa is certain tendencies in 
music, conspicious in "spiri- 
tuals", "work songs" and "the 
blues". But the outstanding fea- 
tures of this "Negro music" can 
be heard on every side in the 
form of jazz and "rock 'n roll". 
Except for the words, much of 
"rock 'n roll" is identical with 
the hymn singing in countless 
churches of poor Negro congre- 
gations throughout the South. 
Since "Whites" accept basically 
"Negro music" with such en- 
thusiasm, it is absurd to speak 
of "a Negro culture" as some- 
thing distinct from that of 
"white" Americans. 

"Social mixing" is entirely 
feasible! This past summer I 
spent two months in Detroit, 
where at least % of the 600,000 
Negroes have just as good 
houses and clothes as their 
"White" neighbors, • — and many 
of them live in "mixed blocks". 

There are certainly many 



CHDC Head Writes 
On Group's Function 



By PETER GOMES '65 

Following traditional STU- 
DENT policy, I, as Chairman of 
the Chase Hall Dance Commit- 
tee, have been invited to sub- 
mit a traditional article for pub- 
lication concerning the tradition- 
al hopes and aspirations of our 
committee in the traditional 
manner for the ensuing year. 

This usually involves a com- 
pilation of the Blue Slip dates 
from the Dean's Office in the 
form of the "Social Calendar", 
and an explanation of our raison 
d'etre. This year, I have chosen 
to depart from this traditional 
formula, and will submit to an 
interview with myself; the inter- 
view consisting of a compila- 
tion of the most frequently ask- 
ed questions concerning CHDC. 
(note: "q" indicates "question"; 
"a" indicates "answer") 

q. What in God's name is 
CHDC? 

a. My first retort to such a 
question is: initials meaning 
Chase Hall Dance Committee. 

q. Yes. What do you do? You 
know what I mean. What vital 
function do you serve here? 

a. That's a better question. We 
are specifically responsible for 
the Saturday evening dances in 
Chase Hall each week. For 
many years this was our only 
task. In recent years, however, 
we have enlarged our thinking 
and somewhat egotistically think 
of ourselves as more of a social- 
planning-coordinating agency. 
In the "good old days" circa 
Dean Rowe, when Saturday eve- 
ning dances were just one step 
below ultimate being, we found 
ourselves quite busy, and our 
functions were particularly vi- 
tal. 

q. This "enlarged thinking of 
yours. . . Does it have any rela- 
tions to the campus "Big Name" 
craze and/or bringing groups to 
campus. 

a. I am always rather amused 
at the phrase "big name"; it 
reminds me of billing for the 
Oberammergau Passion Play; 
but, to answer your question, we 
are more than ever concerned 
with providing the campus with 
new and interesting entertain- 
ment. I personally do not feel 
that "big names" are compatible 
with tiny budgets. Thus in our 
search for programs, we of neces- 
sity look closer to home. One ex- 
ample Of this is last year's high- 
ly successful TRADEWTNDS 
venture. 

q. The temptation is strong to 




"Whites" who are not enthusi- 
astic about such a situation, but 
I saw no signs of tension, and 
I often saw "Whites" and "Col- 
ored" talking amiably together. 
As for the children, it is well 
known that race prejudice is not 
a disease of childhood! (The 
"colored" children, by the way, 
were unbelievably peaceable: I 
walked well over a hundred 
miles in the area where my 
daughters live, and never once 
saw "colored" children fighting, 
and only once heard some boys 
shouting angrily.) 

A great deal of the excite- 
ment about integration would 
be avoided if more facts were 
kept in mind by more people! 

Robert Seward 



chat with you further on this, 
but we had better proceed. How 
does one become a member of 
the CHDC, and what does it in- 
volve? 

a. I have been a member of 
CHDC since October 1, 1961, and 
that happened because as an un- 
knowing freshman, I entered a 
classroom in Hathorn Hall for 
a class which did not meet there 
any longer, and sat down, won- 
dering why a student was at 
the desk. When I left forty min- 
utes later, I was a member of 
the CHDC. Things have changed 
since then. We are now in the 
process of revising our member- 
ship procedures so as to become 
more inclusive, yet more selec- 
tive also. We meet in 200 Petti- 
grew on Monday afternoons at 
4:00 p.m., and our meetings are 
open to the campus community. 
Membership involves a lot of 
work, and very little glory: 
Sweeping butt - ridden floors, 
hanging crepe (to enliven Chase 
Hall), running records for riot- 
ous romps, collecting tickets, 
dishing out millions of gallons 
of cider, and thousands of Holy 
doughnuts, painting posters, con- 
ducting high-levej negotiations 
with Roger Bill, planning for in- 
creased social life and opportun- 
ities, running Sadie Hawkins, 
Back-To-Bates, Spring Weekend 
etc. 

q. Each year at this time, there 
is always much talk about the 
Social Life (or death) here and 
its prospects, defeats, and ef- 
fects. Would you care to make 
a projection as to this year's out- 
look? 

a. The Social Life Seminars 
have become another one of our 
traditions, venerable and hoary, 
and I'm afraid I shall heap coals 
of fire upon my head by aiding 
and abetting its perpetuation 
with the following remarks. We 
are off to a rather good start. 
The first Saturday night dance 
on Sept. 28 was the most pop- 
ulated in recent history. People 
enjoyed themselves, and mira- 
cles were wrought as far as the 
stag line was concerned. We are 
working in co-operation with 
other campus organizations 
(WRJR, STU-C. etc.) in an at- 
tempt to provide this semester's 
Saturdays with a variety of pro- 
grams. In this way we hope to 
stimulate greater participation 
and sustained enthusiasm. Our 
traditional big dances (Back-To- 
Bates, Oct. 26, and Sadie Haw- 
kins, Nov. 2) will soon be upon 
us. These we hope to improve 
and "novelfy" (new word, mean- 
ing to make novel or different). 
We look forward to a revived 
and enthusiastic committee fol- 
lowing our "Hoover Commis- 
sion's" Report soon to be made. 
We are strongly considering a 
"group" (a wretched term, but 
I can't think of a better des- 
criptive word for the High Holi- 
day of Thanksgiving. I do not 
forsee a social revolution, but I 
do look forward to substantial 
changes, reforms, and refine- 
ments. It is well to rave about 
CHDC plans and hopes etc.. but 
they are useless without the sup- 
port, vital interest, and con- 
stant constructive criticism of 
the studentry. 

q. Thank you. We look for- 
ward to heading more from you. ' 

a. You shall indeed! 

A. You shall indeed! 



Hiss Stresses Need 
For Senate Leadership 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



ts 

FIVE 



By WILLIAM HISS '66 

{The following is the first part 
of an article written for publica- 
tion last Spring. With a few 
modifications to bring it up to 
date, it is now printed in the 
hopes of arousing some thought 
and interest in the first Student 
Senate elections. The conclusion 
of the article will be carried next 
week, between the primary and 
final elections. Editor.) 

The college administration is 
often interested in producing an 
efficient machine that methodi- 
cally stamps out nugget-oriented, 
stale minds. But this can be 
changed. It is the responsibility 
of each individual and of the 
new Senate. 

Must Take Initiative 

The student body is too large 
a group to act with a concerted 
* effort; thus the Senate will have 
to take the initiative. If the Sen- 
ate is "to have any function 
other than as a forum for mean- 
ingless debate, it must have the 
power to implement at least some 
of its decisions." 

If it is to measure up to its 
preamble, the Senate must be 
primarly responsible to the stu- 
dents, not the administration, for 
its actions. The Senate must not 
be a rubber stamp in the silent 
hand of Roger Bill, nor a liaison 
for the passing down of "the 
word" from the administration, 
is forced to act in the best in- 
terest of the College policy with 
consideration for student opinion, 
assuming that some exists. 

The Senate must hold its own 
reins and crack its own whip. 
Though many will sneer at these 
idealistic dreams, there will be 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 
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no independent Senate action 
while every Senate check re- 
quires a Dean's co-signature. If 
the administration wants certain 
fiscal policies followed, then let 
them give us the rules and a 
little credit for the responsibility 
and' maturity to follow them our- 
selves. A large portion of the hos- 
tility toward the administration 
results from the sentiment that 
the students are not treated as 
responsible adults. 

I do not propose wringing of 
hands and gnashing of teeth for 
our innocent and maltreated stu- 
dents, but I do say that the Sen- 
ate as Bates' "finest" should be 
given more credit for individual 
responsibility. 

Two years ago the students 
voted in favor of a referendum 
that proposed a $.50 hike per 
man per semester in the Student 
Activities Fee. The proposal was 
presented to the students pri- 
marily, if not solely, as a "social 
fund." According to George 
Stone, '63, then President of the 
Student Council, when the plan 
was presented to Mr. Ross, the 
extra money was to be earmark- 
ed for both a social fund and in- 
creased general expenditures. 
Social Fund 

He admitted that the Stu-C 
did not harp on the "social fund" 
aspect of the plan, but that it 
was mentioned. (I would be 
tempted to conjecture that so 
much tact was used in this mat- 
ter that the point was not really 
gotten across.) However, in an 
interview that I had with Mr. 
Ross, he swore by all that is 
holy that nothing was said 
about the money being used for 
a social fund; and on this basis 
he sold the plan to the trustees. 

Therefore, now he feels that 
the money should not be used 
for a purpose for which the 
trustees have not approved. I'm 
not accusing anyone of sabotage 
or incompetence, but merely try- 
ing to point out that since the 
students and trustees envisioned 
entirely different plans, the 
money has not been used as the 
Stu-C and the students had orig- 
inally intended. 

The price of misunderstanding 
is often high. 



First-Manufacturers 
National Bank 

of Lewiston and Auburn 

CONVENIENTLY 
LOCATED 

for Bates Students at 
458 SABATTUS ST. 

Member F.D.I. C. 



Louis P. Nolin 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 




Open Daily 11.00 A.M. to 2:00 AM. 



AIR WAVES 

By DOUG WAKEFIELD '64 

Throughout the last couple of 
weeks we all have been hearing 
about the new XXX network 
or heard such phrases as "Watch 
the birth of the new XYZ." 
Well, WRJR is not to be out- 
done. 

Already, as of today, those of 
you who have listened have 
heard the new folk hour from 
ten-fifteen to eleven-thirty, and 
the new time of the Sleepytime 
Express, which chugs its way 
from Friday night over to Sun- 
day night. On Tuesday night, our 
industrious weather man Norm 
Bowie jumps from forecasting 
just weather to forecasting up- 
and-coming records. Contempor- 
ary music has a new time and 
engineer, as you will see from 
the schedule. Jazz, like folk 
music, has had its time expand- 
ed due to popular demand. 

New Discussion Show 

Finally, a brand new show 
puts in an appearance this year. 
Friday night, with Pete Hyle at 
the controls and Dick Dow at 
the mike, a discussion show will 
be brought into being. The show 
has been given an open slot 
from ten fifteen until midnight, 
if a discussion should need that 
much time. Also, the Speech 
231 -Radio Broadcasting-class will 
be producing different dramatiza- 
tions, which, when ready, will be 
put on the air in the Friday dis- 
cussion spot. 

It seems so far that this year 
will be an outstanding one for 
WRJR. The unusual response dur- 
ing Freshman Week broadcasting 
was unbelievable, with people 
dropping in to look around — all 
showing genuine interest. 

Fund Drive Dance 

In the past the mention of a 
fund drive in connection with 
any organization meant nothing 
but hard work and donations, 
without ever seeing the results 
of the donations. This year, to 
start the WRJR drive there will 
be a very unusual dance, the 
WRJR Key Club dance, but since 
it isn't until the nineteenth, let 
it suffice now to say that it would 
be a gross oversight on anyone's 
part not to at least give this dance 
some serious thought. Watch for 
posters and advance sales of 
tickets. 

With the tremendous amount 
of enthusiasm shown so far by 
the staff and listeners, let me 
say on behalf of the staff that 
this enthusiasm is appreciated, 

LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gofig 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



Art Association Provides 
For Creative Outlet 




An Association Exhibit 



By PAMELA BALL '64 

Do you look scornfully (but 
perhaps a little wistfully too) at 
the "Draw Me" advertisements 
in the back pages of comic 
books? Do you feel sympathy for 
the student whose creative im- 
pulses make him flee from the 
derision of his roommates to the 
basement of his dorm to paint in 
solitude? Or, do you simply like 
to observe artists at work. 

Do As You Please 

If so, drop over to the Bates 
College Art Association's work- 
shop at 106 Hathorn. There, 
artists and dabblers alike share 
the opportunity to work in ink, 
watercolors, and oils; to do sculp- 
ture, blockprinting, or needle- 
work. Some bring their own ma- 
terials, others use those provid- 
ed by the Art Association. 

Last year the Art Association 
had three major exhibits of orig- 
inal work. The first was an in- 
door showing of the work of stu- 
dents, faculty, housemothers, and 
friends of the colloge, on the 
weekend of November 9th. 

Anyone May Join 

The second exhibit, in Feb- 
ruary, featured student work ex- 
clusively and aroused a good deal 
of interest. The chairman empha- 
sized that anyone who wishes to 
join the Bates Art Association 
may do so whether he pays dues 
or not. 

On Ivy Weekend last May, the 
Association held the first inter- 
collegiate art'show in the history 
of Maine. Art students from Col- 
by College brought over seventy 
pieces to the spring "Festival of 
Art". The pictures were hung on 
snow fences placed along the 
walks facing Coram Library. This 

and we intend to show our ap- 
preciation in the best way a 
radio station can — improved 
broadcasting for you. 



year, the intercollegiate exhibit 
will be expanded to include all 
of the Maine colleges. 

The Art Association made a 
number of trips during the year 
to exhibits in the Central Maine 
area. Many of the members went 
to Bowdoin to see an exhibit of 
sculpture and woodcuts by Leo- 
nard Baskin; to Colby, to see 
their collection of paintings and 
sculpture by Maine artists; and 
to Temple Bethel in Portland to 
see selections from the private 
collections of Maine residents — 
including some work by Picasso, 
Zorach, Wyoth, and Bonnet. 

All those interested in joining 
the Art Association are invited 
to a meeting tomorrow at 4:15 
in the art room. 

Any questions may be addres- 
sed to members of the organiza- 
tion committee: Pamela BalL 
Kathy Home, John David, Phyl- 
lis Shindel, and Finn Wilhelm- 
son. 

NEW VOICES 

(Continued from page three) 

gically natural. The destructive 
power of irrational forces comes 
too, and this theme that is so 
common in modern literature (a 
variation on a theme of Euri- 
pides) attests again to the fact 
of Freud who stated that civili- 
zation is created to repress and 
sublimate irrational drives into 
socially beneficial purposes. 



Vote 

■ 

Thoughtfully 



WRJR SCHEDULE 



TIME 


MONDAY 


1 

TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


6:30 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


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and Sports 


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and Sports 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


6:45 


Bill Young 
Show 


Norm Bowie 
Show 


Ron Green 
Show 


Record Room 
Dick Dow 


Pete Heyel 
Weekend Eve 


8:00 


Masterworks 


Masterworks 


Masterworks 


Masterworks 


Masterworks 


10.00 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


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and Sports 


News, Weather 
and Sports 


10:15 


Insight 
Steve Adams 


Folk/ 
Hour 


Contemporary 
Music 
John David 


Jazz 
John David 


Discussion 
or 

Dramatic 
Presentation 


10:30 
11:00 
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Music 
Til Midnight 


Music 
Til Midnight 


Music 
Til Midnight 


Music 
Til Midnight 



SUNDAY 

6:30 News, Weather and Sports 

6:45 Broadway Music Hall — David Williams 

8: 00 Pianoforte — Bruce Cooper 



10:00 News, Weather and Sports 
10:15 Sleepy Time Express 

— Tom Wyatt 



/6r 
six 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



Coach Peck Returns 
From Year Abroad 




&&&& 



Dr. Peck receives basketball medal in Sweden 



By SUSAN LORD '66 

Dr. Peck, a recipient of a Ful- 
bright Lecturing Grant, has 
just returned from a year's 
leave abroad. After leaving the 
States in August, 1962, Dr. 
Peck and his family flew to Hel- 
sinki, Finland, for a special 
language orientation program. 
Becoming fairly proficient in 
conversational Finnish, he 
moved on to Jyvaskyla, a small 
town in central Finland. 

Here he spent the academic 
year in a Teachers and Liberal 
Arts College, lecturing in physi- 
cal education, and coaching both 
men's and women's basketball. 
The fair-haired coach had the 
most success with the women's 
team, which won the Central 
Finland Championship. Dr. Peck 
expressed an interest in compar- 
ing the prowess of the Bates 
women in basketball with that 
of the girls he coached. He found 
generally that "Finnish students 
were more enthusiastic about 
physical education "than Ameri- 
can youth." / 

Our Fitness Lacks 

Undoubtedly, the overall phy- 
sical fitness is better in Finland 
due to a rugged outdoor life. The 
entire Peck family enjoyed, 
among many other things, cross 
country skiing, the traditional 
Finnish "sauna" steam bath, and 
long walks. Dr. Peck also re- 
ports that a practical means of 
transportation, even through the 
snow, is the bicycle. 

Finland's modern architecture 
especially impressed Peck, but 
most inspiring were the church- 
es. Although the Finns are 
usually difficult to get to know, 
Dr. Peck and his wife broke the 
ice socially by playing the re- 
corder, a small reed instrument, 
played universally there. In ad- 
dition, Dr. Peck observed that 
struggling with a new language 
is worth the trouble, since most 
Finns appreciate a foreigner's ef- 
forts to learn their language. Al- 
though he studied a Finnish 
textbook before going abroad, he 



had to start from the beginning 
again because of a major lan- 
guage revolution presently in 
progress. The Finnish have re- 
jected all words that are based 
on other languages and have 
made up scores of new Finnish 
words to take their place. 
Traveled Widely 

Not only did Peck see Finland, 
but Scotland, Sweden and Eng- 
land as well. In fact, he even 
played his yearly golf game at 
the world-famous St. Andrews 
golf center. While in Scotland, 
Dr. Peck coached in Edinbor- 
ough for the Scottish Basketball 
Federation. He and his family 
also had the opportunity to see 
Stockholm, London, and Strat- 
ford-on-Avon, the birthplace of 
Shakespeare. 

While in Sweden this summer, 
Dr. Peck worked for the Swedish 
Basketball Federation. He lec- 
tured to European coaches and 
taught at a basketball camp. 
From his 110 basketball players 
at the camp, Dr. Peck chose the 
Swedish National Team, which 
competed for the European 
Junior Cup in Paris this past 
September. As a result of his 
work in Sweden, Peck was 
awarded the Swedish National 
Basketball Medal of Honor. The 
Basketball Federation of Swe- 
den has only given 11 of these 
medals, 5 of which have gone to 
Americans. 

Doctorate from Columbia 

As an undergraduate, Dr. 
Peck did his studying at Stetson 
University in Florida. He re- 



By DON KING '64 

This week's intramural scene 
was idle, but the world of sports 
was jumping. All the "smart 
money" was on the L.A. Dodgers 
and the Bums did the impossi- 
ble, taking four straight games 
from the N. Y. Yankees in the 
greatest combined pitching effort 
in World Series history. 

Good Excuse 

The explanation given by those 
foolish enough to wager against 
the Davis Boys and Co. seems 
to be that the Bronx Bombers 
just weren't getting the breaks 
at the plate. It just might be that 
Koufax, Drysdale and Podres 
had something to do with that. 
The Dodgers certainly earned 
their plaudets with a truly great 
exhibition of baseball. Incident- 
ally, by not playing those last 
three games, over $1,000,000 in 
gate receipts was lost — but 
what's one million, right, Wall- 
ach? 

Turning back to intramurals, 
next week the '63-'64 season will 
officially tee off and a large 
turnout is expected from the 
dorms as well as that Off-the- 
Campus Juggeranut I introduced 
you to last week. By the way, 
will all off-campus men interest- 
ed in participating in intramural 
football this fall please contact 
Nick Basbanes sometime within 
the next week? It seems certain 
that the off-campus teams will 
run away with all the A League 
honors this year, and a B 
League might as well be formed 
to perform the same task one 
notch lower. 

Just remember, fellas, it isn't 
who wins that is important, but 
rather ho wthe game is played 
(right, Bekoff?). Well, if you 
boys from the dorms still want 
to come to the games against 
that off-campus line, bring ten 
men and some stretchers. 
And Introducing 

Next week will mark the be- 
ginning of a weekly selection of 
the Intramural Man of the 
Week — it could just as well be 
called Off-Campus Man of the 
Week, but that just wouldn't 
seem right. The choice each 
week will be based on a unani- 

ceived his master's degree from 
New York University, and a 
Doctorate from Columbia Uni- 
versity. Dr. Peck then coached 
for a year in Georgia. Military 
service occupied Dr. Peck until 
he came to teach here at Bates. 



Bobcats Open Here Saturday 
For Dads With Worcester Tech 



By KEITH BOWDEN '64 

Trying to rebound from two 
straight setbacks at the start of 
the season, the Bates Bobcats 
will return to Garcelon Field, 
Saturday, to host the Engineers 
of Worcester Tech on Dad's Day. 

Dad's Day Opener 

The Bobcats will be anxious 
to make their home debut a 
success with the added presence 
of all the fathers. The 'Cats face 
an improved Tech team which 
last year finished the season with 
a 3-4 record while dropping a 
20-6 verdict to Bates at Worces- 
ter. This year Tech has 17 re- 
turning lettermen and they 
have given Coach Bob Pritchard 
an indication of improving on 
last year's performance. 

The Engineers opened their 
season by soundly whipping Cen- 
tral Connecticut State to the 
tune of 33-0. Last Saturday 
against Middlebury they wound 
up on the bottom by the score of 
20-6. 

Tough on the Ground 

The Engineers boast of a po- 
tent ground attack that gained 
200 yards against Central Conn. 
Leading the way was junior 
halfback Denny Gallant, who 



accounted for half this total. 
Gallant's backfield mates will be 
sophomore Ron Crump of West- 
boro, Mass., brother of last 
year's B.C. star Harry Crump, 
at the other halfback position. 
Juniors Bruce Webber at full- 
back and Mike Oliver calling 
singals round out the backfield. 

The Engineer line is led by co- 
captains Bill Shields and Dick 
Ryczek, both ends. The interior 
line boasts of five experienced 
lettermen in Greg Berry, Stan 
Szymanski, Paul Vajcovec, Len 
Kullas and Jack Kelley. If the 
Bobcat line can curtail these 
men, Tech's ground game should 
stall and bring victory to the 
'Cats. 

Get Them While They're Hot 

A large crowd is expected to 
be on hand Saturday for the 
season's home opener. An add- 
ed incentive to attend will be 
the fact that Bates does not 
have an over-abundance of home 
games this year. In fact, Satur- 
day's game represents one-half 
of this year's home schedule of 
two games, so it will be a rare 
occasion this year to be able to 
see the Bobcats in our own ter- 
ritory. 



:i: : . : :vx : y^y^'yy':-:- < 




(Peabody photo) 
Crowd of students gather for last Thursday's rally 



mous decision by myself and my 
staff of Dave Whalen and Bob 
Bekoff. Also, I will institute a 



short section called "horses to 
watch" in the Maine area for all 
you many racing fans. 



N AULT'S 
Hospital Square 

ESSO SERVICENTER 
Dial 782-9170 
305 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

Lubrication - Washing 
Tire Repair - Anti-Freeze 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

Nearest the College 

$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
ROOM LOUNGE 
Tel. 784-5491 



SMITTY'S 
Barber Shop 

274 Sabattus Si. Lewiston 
Tel. 782-9010 
Specializing in 
FLAT TOPS 
ALWAYS TWO BARBERS 

Open - Mon.-Sai., 8-5 

Closed Wednesday 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 

Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK . 



Lady Benoit . 



WELCOME! 

COME BROWSE AT LADY BENOIT 
AND SEE THE "BACK TO BATES" 

FASHIONS! 

Pendleton - Villager - Petti - London Fog 
Lady Bostonian - Aileen - Bobbie Brooks 
and many others 



WE'LL BE GLAD TO SEE YOU 



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109 Lisbon Street 
Lewiston 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



SEVEN 



Bobcat Of The Week 

There is a first in our selection 
of Bobcat of the Week, as a 
freshman, in his first varsity 
meet for Bates, has been chosen 
for this week's honors. 

Karl McKusick, from Roches- 
ter, N. Y., led the Bates cross- 
country team to a perfect 15-50 
score over Colby College last 
Friday. 

Running the course in the 
time of 23 mins. 31 sees., Karl 
was only 34 sees, off the course 
record. The course is about 150 
yds. longer now than when the 
record was established, so this 
puts Karl very close to the re- 
cord. 

Difficult Step 

Karl, who set many distance 
records in high school, won his 
state sectional cross-country meet 
last year. Besides running cross- 
country, Karl should be a defi- 
nite asset to Coach Slovenski's 
winter and spring track teams, 
since he was clocked in 4 min., 



Cheerleader 





(Talbot photo) 



(Farrington photo) 



36 sec. in the one mile, and 9 
min., 57 sec. in the two mile last 
year. ' 

Averaging six miles of daily 
running this summer, Karl ap- 
peared to be in excellent condi- 
tion and should be ready for an- 
other fine performance this Sat. 
against W.P.I, here. It is very 
hard for a freshman to make the 
transition from high school cross- 
country (2% miles) to college 
cross-country (4J4 miles). 



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Faculty — 10% and Green 
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A face seen always smiling, a 
personality vivacious and friend- 
ly, belongs to the captain of the 
cheering squad, Lynn Avery. 
Coming here from Kinsington, 
Conn., Lynn has been a member 
of the squad since her freshman 
year. A biology major, Lynn 
hopes to go into teaching and 
guidance counseling. 

Among her many other activi- 
ties, Miss Avery can be seen car- 
rying a little black book to WAA 
meetings where she functions as 
vice - president. Furthermore, 
Lynn was chosen as a proctor 
at Page. 

Speaking to Lynn about the 
new squad, she says that crea- 
tivity and versatility are the 
watch words for this year. With 
the suggestions of the rest of the 
squad, many new cheers are to 
be incorporated in the coming 
months. From the demonstra- 
tion at last Thursday's rally, big 
things can be expected from the 
cheerleaders. Their spirit was ex- 
ceptional and their maneuvers 
appeared new and intricate. 
Therefore, the STUDENT feels 
that Lynn deserves congratula- 
tions for her fine performance 
as captain of the squad and best 
wishes for continued success. 



Cross Country Team Opens Season 
With Sweeping Victory Over Colby 



BILL DAVIS says: 

"Your Smoking Headquarters' 
Maine's Most Complete 



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28 Ash St. LewUton, Me. 
Tel. 782-8371 



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Tel. 784-5563 



By AL HARVIE '65 

In brisk 50° weather last Fri- 
day afternoon, fc-osh sensation 
Karl McKusick, in his first Bates 
varsity competition, led the high- 
ly regarded 1963 cross-country 
team to a perfect score win 
over Colby College 15 to 50. 
Perfect Score 

Although only the first five 
men from each team figure in 
the scoring, the first seven men 
finishing were garnet harriers. 
Unlike most sports, in cross- 
country the team with the lowest 
number of points is the victor. 
Adding the sum of the first five 
places gave Bates its perfect 
score of 15 to 50. 

Running on our home course, 
which includes such on-campus 
milestones as Garcelon Field, 
Lake Andrews, and MT. David, 
McKusick stepped off the four 
and one quarter miles in the ex- 
cellent time of 23 min. 31 sec. 
The record for this course is 
22 min. 57 sec. set last fall by 
Jerry Ellis of the University of 
Maine. 

Photo Finish 

Capt. Eric Silverberg, who 

finished first for Bates in all of 

its meets last season, finished 

second only twenty-three seconds 

behind McKusick. Running like 

McKusick's shadow for the first 

four miles, Eric was outsprinted 

in the last quarter mile by the 
smooth running frosh. 

Sophomore Ken Trufant had 

to fight off the "flying Finn", 

Finn Wilhelmsen, for third spot 

with Finn just ten seconds back 

in fourth place. The next two 

places were captured by two 
freshmen, Kim Kreutzig and 
Paul Swensen in their Bobcat 
debuts. Kreutzig, unfortunately, 
suffered a severe muscle pull 
and is unlikely to see action for 
several weeks. Completing the 
clean sweep for the 'Cats was 



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Basil Richardson. 

New Blood Pleases 

Coach Walt Slovenski was 
very much impressed by the per- 
formances of all his men and 
especially pleased with the "new 
blood" in their first varsity 
meet. Slovenski said that this 
year's learn is "superior to last 
year's" which was one of the 
best teams since he has been at 
Bates. He added that "although 
we'll be stronger in dual meet 
competition, we won't be as 
strong in the 'big' meets such as 
the E.I.C.A.A. meet in which 
freshmen can't compete." It is 
unfortunate that there are sever- 
al cross-country lettermen on 
campus who have not returned 
to the sport this fall who might 
add the needed depth for "big 
meet" competition. 



Cross-country, which is not 
considered a spectator sport, 
proved contrary as there were 
many spectators lining the on- 
campus course to cheer on the 
teams. 

Bates' next meet is here this 
Saturday, the morning of the 
Dad's Day Game, with W.P.I. 
Bates 

McKusick 1 
Silverberg 2 
Trufant 3 
Wilhelmsen 4 
Kreutzig 5 

15 

Colby 

Wooley 8 
Niederauer 9 
Johnson 10 
McClennon 11 
Simmonds 12 

50 




(Peabody photo) 
McKusick and Silverberg lead the field 



THE SHOE TREE THE SHOE TREE THE SHOE TREE 

'THE BOOTS ARE IN' 

Now you can be ready for the 
chilly days ahead with lined 
and unlined boots. 

From ankle high to the new and exciting 
below the knee. 

Priced at $10.99 to $14.99 

And for today's young woman 
who takes honors in fashion 
as well as in Chemistry, the 
trend is pert little stacks and the 
outstanding KICK-BACK heel. 




THE SHOE TREE is open daily Monday through 
Saturday from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. 

"CONVENIENT CHARGE PLAN" 

THE SHOE TREE 

Northwood Park Shopping Center 

Dial 783-6232 . LEWISTON MAINE 



EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 9, 1963 



Northeastern Bombs Bobcats, 41-6 

Carr Tallies Lone Garnet Score; 
Shoddy Line Play Proves Costly 




With NICK BASBANES 

There have been numerous complaints lately with regard 
to the alleged absence of spirit in the Bates student body. 
But if the results of last Thursday's rally can stand as any 
indication, it would appear that such an impression of an 
apathetic attitude is erroneously based. There were several 
hundred Bates students who took time from their studies to 
follow the band, the cheers, and the general feeling of enthu- 
siastic support. 

And I don't feel that this display was just evidence of an 
unusual and mysterious occurrence. It must be pointed out 
that this is just the beginning of a new year, and due to a 
lop-sided schedule giving us only two home games, the ma- 
jority of us haven't had an opportunity to see the team com- 
pete in actual combat. However, such a misfortune hasn't 
prevented the students from voicing support. As I re- 
call, last year there was similar criticism; but as the year 
unfolded, it was apparent that the students were enthusias- 
tically backing the Garnet squads. People for the most part 
had a hard time finding a good seat at the five home football 
games. They found it difficult getting into the gym for a 
basketball game, and when they got there, couldn't hear 
what the person in the next seat was saying, due to a constant 
roar of tumultuous proportions. It was a good year for Bates 
spirit. And I'll bet that this year proves to be a successful 
carryover. 

I suppose that all of you expect me to gloat over the re- 
sults of the World Series. Well, you're wrong. I'm not even 
going to mention it (not too subtle, is it?). Instead of revel- 
ing in the joys of the past I will again look fearlessly toward 
the future. The day in question is this coming Sunday, the 
place is New York, and the event is the football game be- 
tween the Browns of Cleveland and the Giants of New York. 
My prediction — the Browns will take the Giants by six 
points. I have yet to hear the official (from Las Vegas) odds, 
but the ones I've given should be pretty much the same, so 
when wagering an opinion, feel free to offer that many 
points. 

In making this prediction I fully realize that there are 
many Giant fans about who will be quick to point out that 
the Giants have lost but one game, and that, to a large extent, 
due to the absence of Y. A. Tittle. It was he who in last 
Sunday's game passed for three touchdowns and a net gain 
of 324 yards. But as far as I'm concerned, you can keep your 
receding (hairline) quarterback, and I'll take the Browns, 
who this year, with a new coach, new interest, and renewed 
vitality of their all-time great fullback, Jimmy Brown, 
can't miss meeting Chicago (that's another prediction, by 
the way) to decide who is the world's best. It should prove 
to be an exciting contest. It's too bad I have to go home to 
attend a friend's wedding and can't watch it. 

This next item isn't so much a prediction as it is a predi- 
lection. I'm putting my money on the 'Cats breaking into 
the official win column this Saturday against the once-beaten 
Engineers from Worcester. Now the odds will be heavily 
against the Garnet, and the fact that there's a jinx involved 
in the Worcester game (no one here can recall when we beat 
them last at home) doesn't help much. But the players feel 
that they can knock off a good team. They feel that they 
could have performed better against their last two oppon- 
ents. And most of all, they feel that they're a better team 
than they've shown. 



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By DON DELMORE '64 

The Bobcats fell before North- 
eastern's classy Huskies Satur- 
day 41-6 in a contest played in 
Brookline, Mass. The host squad 
proved to be too strong for Bates 
as they moved to their third 
straight triumph in impressive 
fashion. 

Early Tie 

It appeared that the 'Cats 
might present a strong challenge 
to the heavily-favored Huskies 
as the first quarter was played to 
a 6-6 standoff. Northeastern 
drew first blood as Howard 
Harding broke through the Bob- 
cat defense to block a third 
down quick kick by senior Capt. 
Paul Planchon from the ten 
yard line. Harding dropped on 
the ball in the end zone for the 
first touchdown of the afternoon. 
The conversion was missed and 
Northeastern held a short-lived 
6-0 lead. 

The fiery 'Cats struck right 
back and marched 43 yards on 7 
plays to knot the score with 8 
minutes remaining. Fullback 
Tom Carr, spearheading the 
drive with vicious smashes 
through the Northeastern de- 
fense, took it in from the one. 
The conversion was wide and the 
score stood at 6-6. 

21-6 at the Half 

It was in the second quarter 
that the contest turned into a 
rout. Two touchdowns and suc- 
cessful conversions gave the 
Huskies a 21-6 half time lead. The 
first tally of the quarter came on 
a five yard pass from quarter- 
back John Kennedy to sopho- 

SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, Oct. 9 

Soccer at Nichols 

Saturday, Oct. 12 

Football here with W.P.I. 

(Dad's Day) 
Cross Country here with Bran- 

deis, W.P.I. 
Soccer at Maine (State Series 

competition) 

Wednesday. Oct. 16 

Soccer here with Nasson 



BASKETBALL CANDIDATES 

All men interested in bas- 
ketball are reminded to meet 
in the gym Tuesday. October 
15 at 7:30 p.m. 

— Coach Peck 



JERRY'S VARIETY 

203 College Street 

ICE CREAM and CANDY 
Of All Kinds 



more Jim Thornton with 13:34 
remaining. The conversion was 
made to make the score 13-6. 

The outweighed Bobcats fought 
off any further penetrations un- 
til Northeastern initiated a 61- 
yard drive with 4:38 left in the 
first half. A 30 yard pass from 
Kennedy to left end John Sii- 
verio brought the ball to the 5. 
Thornton again received the 
nod, taking it in on a slant off 
right tackle to run the score to 
19-6. The Huskies rushed for the 
conversion and the score stood 
at 21-6 as time ran out. 
Little Relief 

The second half brought very 
little relief as the Huskies con- 
tinued their drives toward pay- 
dirt. A hard charging line gave 
quarterback Bill MacNevin lit- 
tle time to search downfield for 
an open receiver. Returning to 
action after a leg injury kept 
him sidelined for the Norwich 
game, Mac hit glue-fingered 
halfback John Yuskis with sev- 



eral sharp passes but the fast 
and heavier Northeastern line 

continued to stall any Bobcat 
threats throughout the second 
half. 

The Huskies needed only eight 

plays to march for another 

score as the third period began. 

Sophomore fullback Bob Cappa- 

dona, the workhorse of the 

Northeastern line throughout the 

afternoon, took it in from the 

two yard line to make the score 

27-6. The remainder of the 

third quarter was scoreless but 

the Huskies added 14 more 
points in the final period to ac- 
count for the 41-6 routing. 

'Cats Outclassed 

Statistics presented below show 
that the 'Cats were outgained 
276 yards to 86 yards on the 
ground and 69 to 59 through the 
air. All making the trip to 
Brookline saw the inexperienced 
Bobcats run into a classy North- 
eastern eleven that must rate 
among the best in New England. 




Tom Carr eludes one tackier; Luciano closes in. 

(Herald photo) 



STATISTICS 



Northeastern Bates 



First downs , 

Net yards gained rushing ... 

Forward passes 

Forwards completed 

Yards gained, forwards 

Ow^i forwards intercepted . 
Distance of punts, average* 

Fumbles 

Own fumbles recovered 

Penalties 

Yards lost, penalties 

♦From line of scrimmage 



20 


11 


276 


86 


11 


16 


6 


4 


69 


59 


0 


3 


39 


31 


0 


5 


0 


2 


6 


2 


70 


20 



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'Bates 




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Vol. XC, No. 4 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



By Subscription 



Panel Discussion OpensHomecoming 



Weekly Career Panels 
Offer Students 



Last Friday it was Chemistry, 
and this week it's Economics, 
and throughout the year panel 
discussions will emphasize the 
post - graduate experiences of 
alumni who majored in various 
disciplines at Bates. 

In accordance with the gen- 
eral program of the conferences, 
one alumnus will speak in 
Chapel. At noon the panel will 
lunch with the department mem- 
bers and talk over problems 
and graduate positions. In the 
afternoon in the Women's Union 
interested students will be able 
to participate in an informal 
question period with the panel- 
ists. 

Review for the Future 

The Academic Discipline Con- 
ferences were inaugurated as 
part of the Bates Centennial 
Year Celebration. "A centennial 
year is a particularly appropri- 
ate time to review for the future 
and we hope to learn better 
what our curriculum should be 
by this self-analysis," said Dean 
Healy, co-ordinator of the Con- 
ferences. 

Concerning the practicality of 
the Conferences, Dean Healy 
stated, "I have every reason to 
think the meetings will be val- 
uable toward this end." Future 
Conferences will be in Philoso- 
phy and Religion, November 1; 
and Physics, November 22. Two 
other Conferences that are ten- 
tatively to be held are: Speech, 
December 6; and Government, 
December 13. 

Chem Panel 

In last week's discussion of 
chemistry, Dr. Robert Brouillard 
delivered the chapel address and 
praised the academic curiosity 
instilled in him at Bates. He ad- 
vised students to establish 
worthy goals and work hard to 
achieve them. 

At three o'clock in the Wo- 
men's Union, Dr. Brouillard was 
joined by Dr. Milan Chapin, 
M.D., Dr. Frederick Martin of 
the General Electric Research 
Laboratory, and Dr. Gordon 
Hiebert, chairman of Bowdoin's 
chemistry department. Repre- 
senting a broad cross-section of 
achievements based on an edu- 
cation in chemistry, each man 
described his career, and 
answered questions from * the 
Bates chemistry department staff 
and the 32 students who attend- 
ed. 

All four of the speakers 
strongly recommended as much 
education as possible, preferably 
a Ph.D., before starting work; 
since learning is easier for stu- 
dents in their early twenties and 
they have fewer hindering res- 
ponsibilities than later in their 
lives. 

(Continued on page three) 



Guests And Students Evaluate 
Conservatism Vs. Liberalism 

"Does Conservatism or Liberalism Offer the Greater Value to Today's College Student" 
will be the question under discussion by four distinguished guests and four students a week 
from this Friday. Messrs. Alfred C. Fuller, Fred M. Hechinger, Eugene F. O'Neill, and 

Mrs. Barbara N. Tuchman are* 




Fred Hechinger 



Student Senate 

The following is the final list 
of candidates for the Student 
Senate. 

Senior Men (Elect four) 
Robert Ahern 
Douglas Dobson 
John Meyn 
David Parmelee 
Paul Sadlier 

Junior Men (Elect three) 
James Aikman 
Edward Brooks 
Howard Dorfman 
Clifford Goodall 

Sophomore Men (Elect two) 
Bradford Andersen 
Richard Crocker 
Alan Cruickshank 
Max Steinheimer 

Senior Women (Elect four) 
Marilyn Fuller 
Carol Kinney 
Jane McGrath 
Susan Stanley 
Margaret Ziegler 
Margery Zimmerman 
(Continued on page three) 



the guest participants. They will 
be joined by Prof. James V. 
Miller, moderator, and Bates 
seniors Robert Ahern, Norm 
Bowie, Norman Gillespie, and 
Alice Winter. 

Pulitzer-Prize Author 

Graduate and Trustee of Rad- 
cliffe College, Mrs. Barbara 
Tuchman is a Pulitzer Prize 
winning authoress. The Guns of 
August won her the coveted 
prize in 1962. Mrs. Tuchman is 
a student of foreign policy and 
military events of World War I. 
She has served as an American 
correspondent for the London 

Fuller is founder and board 
chairman of the Fuller Brush 
Company. Born in Nova Scotia, 
he came to the U. S. at the age 
of 18. Shortly afterwards he be- 
gan a business which now does 
$30 . million of business each 
year. 

Fuller has also been a director 
of the National Better Business 
Bureau, president of the Conn- 
ecticut Manufacturers Associa- 
tion and a member of the Na- 
tional Association of Manufact- 
urers. 

"Times" Education Editor 

Author and journalist, Mr. 
Fred M. Hechinger is education 
editor of the New York Times. 
German by birth, Mr. Hechinger 
came to this country in 1937. 
Graduated from New York City 
College, he did post-graduate 
work at N. Y. U. and the Uni- 
versity of London. 

Prior to working for the New 
York Times, he served as a cor- 
respondent for the London 
Times and was employed by the 
Washington Post and the New 
York Herald Tribune. This year 
he published his most recent of 
several books, Teenage Tyranny. 
Telestar Manager 

Scientist Eugene F. O'Neill of 
the Bell Telephone Laboratories 
is largely responsible for the 
communication satellite "Tele- 
star", project he managed for 
Bell. A native of New York, he 
has studied at Columbia College, 
and Columbia School of Engin- 
eering. 

O'Neill holds a B.S. in elec- 
trical engineering and an M.Sc. 
A lifetime employee of Bell, he 
has also worked on radio com- 
munications, airborne and 
ground radar transmitters, and 
co-axial cable operations. 

Moderator for the panel will 
be Dr. James V. Miller, of the 
Bates Religion Department. 

Each student represents an 
important student organization. 
They are: Alice Winter of the 
Student Government, Robert 
Ahern of the Men's Council, 




Eugene O'Neill 



Calendar 

Today 

Soccer with Nasson (home) 
Vespers, 9:30 to 10 p.m. 

Tomorrow 

Gould Political Affairs speak- 
er, 7:30 to 9 p.m., Libbey 8. 

Friday, Oct. 18 , 

Rob Players Movie, "World of 

Apu," 7 p. m. in the Little 

Theatre 
De-bibbing Night, WGB 

Sunday, Oct. 20 
Outing Club Mountain Climb 

Monday, Oct. 21 
Final elections for Student 
Senate, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. in 
the gymnasium lobby 
Hillel Meeting, Women's Union, 
7 p. m. 

Tuesday, Oct. 22 
Soccer with Bowdoin (home) 



Norman Gillespie, editor-in-chief 
of the STUDENT, and Norman 
Bowie, president of the senior 
class. Miss Winter is an English 
major, and the three men are 
Philosophy majors. 



Lincoln Tours Islam 
Temple And History 

Dr. C. Eric Lincoln conducted 
an imaginary tour through a 
Black Muslim temple, pointing 
out the beliefs and history of the 
movement, Monday night in a 
crowded Little Theater. 

The tour began with the ap- 
proach of a Negro man to the 
door of the temple which is 
probably located in the 'black 
ghetto" of a large industrial 
city. The visitor is registered, 
searched, and escorted to a front 
row seat. A question mark con- 
fronts him. 

Islam or Christianity? 

To the left of the question 
mark are an American flag, a 
Christian cross, and a painting 
of a charred Negro body hang- 
ing from a tree. To the right, 
are the words "Peact, Justice, 
Equality, Islam", a star, and a 
crescent. The young minister 
greets the congregation in Ara- 
bic, and, after all have risen and 
faced the East for prayer, he 
begins to speak. 

The subject of his sermon is 
probably based upon the be- 
liefs of the Black Muslim move- 
men. According to Black Muslim 
mythology, when the earth first 
cooled there was only the black 
man, dedicated to the worship of 
Allah. A trusted servant of Al- 
lah, aspiring to rule the world, 
searched for, but failed to find, 
a black man who was willing to 
conspire in the revolt against 
Allah. 

White Man Is Evil 

This devil, Yuka, retreated to 
an island where he performed 
genetic experiments for 600 
years. A brown man was the re- 
sult. 600 more years of testing 
produced a red man, 600 more, a 
yellow man, 600 more a white 
man ,the ultimate corruption. 

When the whites migrated 
from Europe to America, they 
found the conditions hostile and 
turned to Africa for help. The 
Muslims speak of the ship, called 
"Jesus", which carried Africans 
from their home, enticed by 
promises of a new religion, 
Christianity. 

In America, the white man de- 
prived the Negro of his lan- 
guage, forcing him to speak 
English; his name, giving him a 
Christian name; and his relig- 
ion, substituting an anthropo- 
morphic Jesus for the true god, 
Allah. Christianity is considered 
the white man's strategy for en- 
slaving the black. 

Opposed to Civil Rights 

Lincoln indicated that the 
Black Muslims are opposed to 
Negro civil rights movements. 
Muslims do not want integra- 
tion in a white state — they 
want their own country. They 
demand of the U. S. government 
that 26 states be given to them 
as repayment of their share in 
building the country's greatness. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



Forensic Forecasts 

by SUSAN STANLEY '64 

This week's column introduces 
those members of the student 
body taking Speech 403-404 — 
the Senior debaters. According 
to Professor Quimby, the class of 
'64 has done unusually well in 
debating. Off to a good start as 
freshmen, they won the first 
place trophy at the St. Anselm's 
novice tourney against some of 
the best debating schools in the 
East. 

Sophomore year they went on 
to the varsity team and, team- 
ing up with the upperclassmen, 
brought back the second-place 
trophy at the MIT tournament 
and qualified for the quarter- 
finals at a tournament in Wash- 
ington, D. C, attended by schools 
from all over the nation. 

Their third year at Bates 
brought a clean sweep of the 
Eastern Championships in a most 
impressive collection of silver 
trophies. And this year? Well, 
the challenge is there and the 
team will be working hard to 
make a grand finale. 

Introducing 

Now to introduce them: Tom 
Hall is president of the Debating 
Council. A history major, he 
plans to do graduate work in 
Great Britain — preferably in 
Scottish history (on the clan 
McKinnon of the Isle of Skye 
perhaps??). Tom was a member 
of the four who topped the St. 
Anselm's tourney and has done 
consistently good debating ever 
since. 

Bob ("I mean . . . like . . . 
how cool is that!") Ahern is 
manager of the Debate Council. 
He has an impressive record of 
debating both in high school and 
here at Bates. As a sophomore 
he received individual speaker 
excellence recognition at both 
MIT and Washington. 

Last year, against top compe- 
tition from the Eastern colleges, 
he placed first in extemporane- 
ous speaking at both the New 
Englands and the Easterns 
Tournaments, and here at Bates 
he won the Oratorical Contest 
and tied for second in the Jun- 
ior-Senior Prize Speaking Con- 
test. A philosophy major whose 
future plans include law school, 
he is also president of the Stu- 
dent Council. 

The Boys 

John Strassburger, a history 
major (Strassburger, you better 
get a memory man!), is a proc- 
tor in Smith Middle and presi- 
dent of Rob Players. As a soph- 
omore he won the Bates Orator- 
ical Contest and last year tied 
for second place with Ahern in 
the Junior-Senior Prize Speak- 
ing Contest. 

He has been a consistently 
improving debater — in '63 be- 
ing a member of the winning 
Easterns team and making the 
finals in the New Englands tour- 
nament with his partner, How- 
ard Blum '63. 

. . . And . • • 

Bob Boyd (who was that who 
appeared in both the Young 
Democrats and the Young Re- 
publicans in the Mirror? ??) is a 
history major. He is also a proc- 
tor in Chase Hall and is fre- 
quently to be seen making use 
of its various facilities. A mem- 
ber of the winning Freshman 
Prize Debate team, Bob has ap- 
peared in a number of exhibi- 
tion debates for civic groups. 

Morris (Well, I don't see how 
you can say that!) Lelyveld is 
doing history Honors. His outside 
interests include the presidency 



Thumm Tells Republicans 
It's Goldwater In 1964 




"At the present time, I don't think that Governor Rocke- 
feller has a chance of winning the Republican nomination. 
I don't even believe he can bring about a deadlock in the 
convention. This leaves us with Senator Goldwater." So 
stated Bates College Professor of* 
Government Dr. G. W. Thumm 
in a speech before the Young 
Republican Club last Tuesday 
evening. 

Dr. Thumm' based the blame 
for Rockefeller's recent poor 
showing in the polls not on the 
Governor's divorce, but on his 
subsequent remarriage. "I think 
Rockefeller was a little shocked 
at his drop in popularity," Dr. 
Thumm explained. 

Dark Horses 

In listing some "dark-horse 
candidates", he mentioned Gov. 
Romney of Michigan, Gov. 
Scranton of Pennsylvania and 
Sen. Morton of Kentucky. While 
"dark-horses" have been known 
to suddenly emerge into the 
light, Thumm explained that 
this is only the case when there 
is a deadlock. 



In choosing a candidate for 
the Presidency, the Republican 
Party must take into considera- 
tion three basic aims. First, and 
most obvious, there is the neces- 
sity of choosing a man who has 
a chance to win. Second, the 
party must choose a man behind 
whom other candidates have a 
chance of being elected. Third, 
they need a man who will 
strengthen the party. 

Dr. Thumm pointed out that 
Senate "Class of '58" is up for 



of the Political Union and mem- 
bership in the Rob Players 
movie committee. 

A faithful member of the De- 
bate Club, Morris was a member 
of the winning Freshman Prize 
Debate team and has been a 
conscientious debater the last 
three years. This last weekend 
he traveled with Boyd, Bowie, 
and Rosenblatt '66 to present an 
exhibition debate for the New 
Hampshire high school debating 
league. 

The Lady 

And Yours Truly makes up 
the final member of the Senior 
debaters. Last year I had a sab- 
batical in Scotland and now it's 
back to debating again, as well 
as completing a major in Gov- 
ernment. 

We hope now that you have a 
better idea of just who your det- 
bate club is. Next week we will 
introduce the underclassmen 
who are showing promise of a 
good team in the future. 



re-election in '64 and that with 
the right man running for Pres- 
ident, the Republican Party has 
a chance of gaining back many 
of the seats they lost in 1958. 

Needs to be Positive 

In response to a question con- 
cerning Goldwater's apparent 
"move toward the center", Dr. 
Thumm said that this may be 
true to an extent and that it is 
most probably caused by his 
need to be positive. 

"Goldwater has been on the 
outside until now," Thumm con- 
tinued. "It is always easy to be 
vocally brilliant in opposition. 
He is feeling the pressure of the 
two-party system. He has con- 
vinced the conservatives, now 
he has to reassure the moder- 
ates. Goldwater is now running 
to win an election." 

Can the Republican Party take 
over the chief executive's office 
in 1964? "The backfires on the 
Civil Rights issue may become 
so bad that they will defeat Ken- 
nedy. I see this as the one hope 
for the Republican Party in 
1964." 



Guidance 

INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

On October 17, Thursday, Mr. 
David Zaron will be on campus 
to interview men and women 
interested in applying for Man- 
agement and Specialized Train- 
ing Opportunities in the New 
York State Department of Civil 
Service. Most trainee positions 
offer a first year salary of $5500. 
Candidates are not required to 
be residents of New York. Ad- 
ministration, Mathematics, Guid- 
ance and Social Work are a few 
of these career opportunities. 
Applicants must take a written 
test on December 7, 1963. All in- 
terested students should sign up 
immediately at the Guidance 
and Placement Office for an in- 
terview with Mr. Zaron. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

Poland Spring House at Poland 
Spring, Maine, has announced 
weekend opportunities for col- 
lege students as waiters and 
waitresses. Anyone interested 
should contact Mr. Goggins, 
Maitre D'Hotel, at 998-4351. 
REMINDER TO SENIORS 

You are reminded to return 
your registration blanks to the 
Guidance and Placement Office. 
It is to your advantage. 

The East-West Center in Hon- 
olulu is again offering one hun- 
dred scholarships for graduate 
study at the University of 
Hawaii which include field study 
in Asia for those who qualify. 

Valued at about $8500, these 
scholarships are for a two-year 
period beginning in September, 
1964. Full tuition, living ex- 
penses, plus round-trip trans- 
portation from the student's 
home and a small personal al- 
lowance, are provided. 

Full information may be ob- 
tained by writing the Director 
of Student Selection, East-West 
Center, University of Hawaii, 
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822. 



CHAPEL 

JUNIORS IN ATTENDANCE 

Wednesday, Oct. 16 

Rev. George Bullens, Minister, 
Auburn Methodist Church 

Friday. Oct. 18 

Richard L. Breault '53, Cen- 
tennial Speaker on Econom- 
ics 



College Honors 
QPR Leaders 

The Fall Honors Meeting to 
honor outstanding upperclass- 
men for scholarship and general 
achievement took place last 
Monday in the Chapel. Doctor 
Charles F. Phillips, presiding 
with Dr. Alfred Wright, chair- 
man of the foreign languages 
department, spoke on the close 
relationship between high qual- 
ity in academic work on the col- 
lege campus and success as a 
citizen in a'fter college years. 

The president pointed out that 
when business firms visit the 
college campus to employ seniors 
they attach considerable weight 
to academic record. 

For entrance into graduate 
school, a good scholastic record 
is practically a "must". An em- 
phasis on scholarship is also 
found in the policies followed by 
other nations in selecting stu- 
dents to study in the United 
States. 

"These trends," concluded Dr. 
Phillips, "give added significance 
to the honor we pay today to 
those Bates students who have 
achieved exceptional academic 
records during the past year." 

In addition to several speech 
and debating prizes the general 
scholarship for the highest rank- 
ing man and woman in the three 
upper classes was awarded. The 
recipients of the latter were: 
Norman Ernest Bowie, Dorothy 
Babcock -March, Class of '64; 
Jeffery Allen Rouault, Laura 
Sutherland Deming, Class of 
'65; Kenneth Edward Petke, Lois 
Ann Herbert, Class of '66. 



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BATES STUDgNT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



si 

THREE 



London Bridge 



By RICHARD HILLMAN '65 

The common adjectives "dig- 
nified, formal, restrained and 
conservative" are justly applied 
in describing the British. Brit- 
ishers pride themselves with 
these traits and seem to live up 
to them to a great extent. Bowl- 
er hats and canes are a common 
(if not necessary) sight on the 
streets of this large, yet quaint 
city. London "bobbies" maintain 
an air of dignity withtout carry- 
ing guns. Even while directing 
traffic their mannerisms are 
those of tin soldiers. And the 
traffic! Cars zip by turning cor- 
ners at right angles — from the 
left side of the road! This latter 
may be quite frustrating, if not 
fatal to a visiting Yankee. 

In giving directions Londoners 
are especially precise, often 
going out of their way to assure 
precision. In fact, after explain- 
ing a route several times, one 
might be led on to the particular 
destination. 

London itself is similar to New 
York City or Boston in many 
respects. Soho, the gathering 
place of an international group 
of bohemians, reminds one of 
New York's Greenwich Village. 
The theatre district in the vicin- 
ity of Picadilly Square offers a 
wide variety of entertainment 
Both European and American 
cinema are shown there. Legiti- 
mate theatre is far less expen- 
sive than in the United States. 
"Dress circle," the Britfeh coun- 
terpart of orchestra seats, are 
dear at the equivalent of $1.50. 





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Peculiar to London are Royal 
palances, towers and forts, now 
mainly tourist attractions. Mu- 
seums and art galleries often 
contain relics dating back to Ro- 
man, Greek and Egyptian em- 
pires. 

The average Britisher seems to 
feel obligated to student hitch- 
hikers, to provide not only trans- 
portation but interesting conver- 
sation throughout the trip. As a 
result of hitching through England 
one gains a fairly accurate fa- 
miliarity with a general cross- 
section of the British people. 
They take pride in their occupa- 
tions, whether it be Lorry driv- 
er or doctor. The British accept 
their places in life and do not 
expect the facile mobility of 
Americans. 

Due to some members of the 
lower class seeking to better 
themselves, especially through 
education, the distinct social 
class structure is slowly dimin- 
ishing. However, "For God, 
King, and Country" seems to 
have an enduring effect and still 
prevails in Britain. 

Next article: The Scottish Stu- 
dent. 

Panels 

(Continued from page one) 

Economics 

The panel discussion this Fri 
day will consider Ihe problems 
preparation and position of Eco 
nomics as a major discipline. 

Richard L. Breault of the De 
partment of Budget for the 
Federal Food and Drug Admin- 
istration will head the panel. 
Julian Freedman, assistant to the 
executive vice-president of the 
American Stock Exchange; Paul 
W. MacAvoy, professor of eco 
nomics at M.I.T.; E. Robert Kin- 
ney, president of Gortons of 
Gloucester are the other mem 
bers of ihe panel. 



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Club News 

Dr. Paul W. MacAvoy, assist- 
ant professor of economics at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology and Mr. Julian Freedman, 
of the American Stock Ex- 
change, will address the Ec- 
onomics Club this Friday eve- 
ning at 7 p. m. in Room 3, Libbey 
Forum. 

Dr. MacAvoy, who just recent- 
ly received his appointment to 
the faculty at MIT, has been do- 
ing researching in three areas; 
the economic effect of Interstate 
Commerce Commission regula- 
tion upon railroad transport 
markets; Federal Power Com- 
mission regulation of natural 
gas field prices since 1960; and a 
casebook study of the economic 
results of Sherman Act rulings. 

Dr. MacAvoy, a graduate of 
the class of 1955, is the author 
of the book, "Price Formation in 
Natural Gas Fields: A Study of 
Competition, Monopoly and 
Regulation," Yale University 
Press, 1962. His topic Friday will 
be present and future state of 
government regulation of indus- 
try. 

Mr. Freedman is also a Bates 
graduate and is now working 
with the American Stock Ex- 
change. His topic will be "An 
Arfatomy of Wall Street". 

Both talks will be followed by 
a brief question and answer per- 
iod. All interested students are 
welcome. 



Senate Must Have 
A Strong President 



Senate 

(Continued from page one) 
Junior Women (Elect three) 

Cindy Bagster-Collins 

Laura Deming 

Prudence Grant 

Pauline Grimmeisen 

Sally M. Smyth 

Donna Whitney 
Sophomore Women (Elect two) 

Carol Brown 

Chris Christensen 

Priscilla Clark 

Judith Dietz 

Barbara Remick 



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i 



By WILLIAM HISS '66 

I went into Mr. Ross's office 
fully expecting something out of 
Dicken's Scrooge behind the 
desk. I was pleasantly surprised. 
I found him not at all to be the 
ogre-in-chief head of den bull 
sessions; the clamps on the wall 
are for his rubber stamps and 
are not thumb screws. 

There were no bright lights 
in my face; I heard no muffled 
screams from the filing cabinet. 
He was courteous and friendly, 
and answered all my questions 
in a straightforward manner. He 
has the most difficult job of 
keeping the College solvent on 
the two-dollar donations that the 
alumni give out the goodness of 
their hearts and the purity of 
their souls. 

Yes, of course he's conserva- 
tive, but a few conservatives do 
get into Heaven, and besides, he's 
keeping this venerable institu- 
tion off the financial rocks. A 
few points gained from the in- 
terview: 

Interview Summarized 

1. There will be no "social 
fund." I quote Mr. Ross: "Too 
much money is the worst thing 
in the world." That's it — he 
seemed rather firm, and I'm not 
about to carry the bloodstained 
flag over the barricade. 

2. Stu-C (and I would guess 
the Senate) will not be allowed 
to give money to other organiza- 
tions for social purposes. "Each 
event must stand on its own 
two feet." On a loan basis? Too 
complicated, and "sooner or later 
somebody won't be able to pay 
off. Then what will you do?" 
Mr. Ross' objection to this meth- 
od is that money collected from 
all students is used for the en- 
tertainment of a very small frac- 
tion of the students. But then 
carrying this idea a bit further, 
one could not justify any expen- 
ditures with Student Activities 
Fee funds for any form of the 
social life, since all the students 
will never benefit. 

More Union Facilities 

3. Contrary to the statement 
printed on the inside cover of 
last May's alumni issue of the 
"Bates College Bulletin," Mr. 
Ross says that there are no plans 
for expansion of student union 
facilities in Chase Hall. The state- 
ment reads: "The movement of 
all the administrative offices of 
the College to this building will 
make available. . .more student 
union facilities in Chase Hall. 

He says that there will be no 
general co-ed use of existing fa- 



cilities. Mr. Ross feels that the 
men should "have some place to 
retreat from the girls." (Re- 
treat!... we're just attacking in 
another direction!) Dorm lounges 
for male use only?. ..apparently 
not feasible. 

Dean Boyce reiterated Mr. 
Ross' statement that stag lounges 
in the mens' dorm were most un- 
likely. However, he said that he 
would like to see expanded un- 
ion facilities in Chase Hall (for 
example, a separate TV room 
upstairs) with a possibility of 
part of the space being earmark- 
ed for general co-ed use. 

The problem of this arrange- 
ment would be fostering an atti- 
tude similar to that of the den; 
i.e., the girls aren't made to feel 
like brownie scouts at a Mafia 
meeting. I took some girls into 
Skelton lounge once and the air 
turned a small, friendly, coedu- 
cational, icy blue. 

4. What about new social ac- 
tivities? "How can you expect 
to make new activities pay when 
the ones you have now are poor- 
ly attended?" A valid point, no? 
That's your problem, and mine. 
I think more turnouts like the 
"Tradewinds" audience last 
spring will mellow Mr. Ross' at- 
titude on this subject. 

Strength in Unity 

These are some of the prob- 
lems about which we talked. I 
often cannot agree with him, but 
I can see his point. I find this 
technique far more effective 
than the namecalling of which I 
myself have been guilty in times 
past. 

What can the students do to 
enhance the effectiveness of the 
Senate? First, elect and back to 
the hilt a strong president who 
will represent the students to 
the administration, not vice -ver- 
sa. Second, align yourselves more 
closely with the faculty. 

Mr. Ross indicated that the 
faculty and administration do 
not always see eye to eye on 
policy. Perhaps we could hope 
for a Moscow-Peking situation. 
The faculty are our intellectual 
guides through this vast cavern 
of knowledge; the administra- 
tion but the gatekeepers. 

One last thought that I pick- 
ed up in a 2:00 a.m. bathroom 
bull session: the administration, 
like a father, has the power to 
control all its "childrens' " ac- 
tions, but by exercising this 
power, it destroys the very per- 
son it seeks to protect and con- 
trol. 



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FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



Editorials 



I The Student Senate 

Is the new Student Senate defeated before it meets for 
the first time? Last year when the new form of government 
was voted for by all the student body, the very fact that it 
was adopted should have meant that the studentry thought 
it was a good idea and a system preferable to the existing 
one. Now, however, this does not seem to be the case. 

Why? Because the responses to the primary election were 
miniscule, to say the least. There are those who are con- 
vinced that the Senate will be ineffectual (this judgment be- 
fore it tries to effect anything); and those who fail to realize 
that the purpose of the Senate is to coordinate the men's and 
women's sides of the campus and give every student an op- 
portunity to voice his opinions. 

And what happens? The primary elections were complete- 
ly unnecessary in all except two cases (the sophomore and 
junior women) because not enough students cared enough 
about the governing body to have forty people sign their pe- 
titions. 

If this is any forecast of the support the Student Senate 
will receive in the future, perhaps it would be better to for- 
get the whole thing now and continue on with treasured tra- 
dition and no change whatsoever. 

M. Z. 



The College Experience 

There are many things happening on campus this week, 
the interconnection of which is important. Student Senate 
elections, Career Discipline Panel Discussions, a discussion 
of Urban Renewal, a consideration of possible Presidential 
candidates, a talk on the Balck Muslim movement, and a 
meeting of the Economics club are all taking place outside 
the curriculum. 

Few students, however, participate in these events. The 
process of getting an education does not include listening to 
speakers, or running for office, or simply taking part in any- 
thing for too many students. Courses and required reading 
appear to be the limit for many horizons. 

Yes, basically college is an experience. It is the professor 
more than the subject, that we remember. The things done, 
and the experiences had are the core of the college years; not 
the material memorized, nor the subjects studied. 

The demands of study do not permit anyone to take part 
in everything that happens on campus. But everyone can and 
should view campus events not as something to attend if they 
have the "free time," but as an integral part of the education- 
al process. 

Last Monday morning, Bates College honored the man and 
woman in each of the three upperclasses, who had the high- 
est qpr for the previous semester. But far greater testimony 
to the worth and purpose of Bates College was paid that eve- 
ning by the more than 300 students who required C. Eric 
Lincoln's talk to be re-located in the Little Theater. 

For too long, Bates has emphasized Core Courses and "hard 
work" as the basis of a liberal education. Perhaps, during 
this year, students and faculty alike, will learn that College 
is not 15-17 hours a week in a classroom, and four hours a 
day spent studying. Education is a process. It is the libera- 
tion of one's self. 



"Bam IP Student 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot '64 - Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 v Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, Steve Adams '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
'66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 

Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6661. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street. Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-claas matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 

i 



Lewistonites Seek To 
Smash Urban Renewal 

By PETER d'ERRICO '65 

"Smash Urban Renewal" is the slogan of the Save Lewis- 
ton Committee which has been formed by certain merchants 
who hope to prevent this city from cleaning up some of its 
slum areas. 

Although most of us have at* 
least a passing acquaintance 



with Lewiston's poorer areas and 
know a little about Urban Re- 
newal, we still might be hard 
pressed to combat or refute the 

distortions in the "Case Against 
Urban Renewal" presented by a 
paper called Human Events and 
distributed by the Save Lewiston 
Committee. 

Distortions of fact run rife 
throughout this "Case" accom- 
panied by numerous logical con- 
traditions and non-sequitors. 

Marxist Deception 

A striking example of this 
muddy thinking is an article by 
one Howard E. Kershner, editor 
of Christian Economics, which 
concludes: "Urban Renewal, like 
other forms of government in- 
tervention in the business activi- 
ties of the people, is Marxism. 
Its object is redistribution ^of 
wealth. Its result is wider im- 
poverishment along with the 
destruction of freedom. It is one 
of the tools by which Marxists 
deceive good people ■ and induce 
them to speed up the process of 
their own Communization." 

Fuzzy Thinking 

Obviously this man has only 
the fuzziest idea, if even that, of 
what Marxism is. Somehow, 
businessmen have usually been 
able to reconcile their dislike of 
government "interference" with 
their desire for tariffs, Federal 
research grants, and the like. 
Apparently, some forms of in- 



"more equal 



tervention are 
than others". 

It is also interesting to note 
that the freedoms being de- 
stroyed are such as the freedom 
to live in poverty, the freedom 
to be taken advantage of by un- 
scrupulous landlords, etc. This is 
not the first time that the most 
heinous crimes have been per- 
petrated under the guise of 
"freedom of the individual". 

Tomorrow Night 

It is time we realized the 
responsibilities of the individual. 
To this end, the Gould Political 
Affairs' Club 4s bringing to the 
campus an expert in the area of 
Urban Renewal. He is William 
MacDonald, Co-Director of Ur- 
ban Renewal in Lewiston. He 
will speak Thursday night at 
7:30 in Room 8, Libby Forum. 

We should not have to be 
urged to attend. The survival 
ability of our form of govern- 
ment lies in its ability to fulfill 
the needs of the people for 
whom it is instituted. This, in 
turn depends on our ability to 
know and understand not only 
these needs, but also our respon- 
sibility to meet them. 

To Meet the Need 

If democracy as we know it is 
not able to meet the needs, it 
will be buried in the search of a 
government that is. It is import- 
ant that we take every oppor- 
tunity to learn and act. 
Gould is offering us such an op- 
portunity. 



Find Beechey's Daughter: 
Hanging In Treat Gallery 



By ROZ AVERY '64 
A lovely young woman, said 
to be one of the several daugh- 
ters of Sir William Beechey, was 
seen hanging in Pettigrew. She 
was not only hanging, but 
framed. Portrait of a Young 
Lady, now in Pettigrew's Treat 
Gallery, is a recent acquisition 
of the Fine Arts Center. It was 
given by Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
A. Schmutz of New York City. 

Regency Period 

In England's Regency Period, 
when portraits were the mode, 
the artist Sir William Beechey 
(1753-1839) found favor with 
George III and became portrait 
painter to Queen Charlotte. His 
copious work pleased the fash- 
ionable world of his day and in 

CORRECTION 

Due to an oversight, the byline 
of "Comment on Ciardi: All 
God's Chillun Got Rhythm" on 
page three of last week's STU- 
DENT was omitted. The author 
was John Bart '64. In addition, 
the author intended to have a 
question mark at the end of the 
headline. Bart urges those read- 
ers who missed the article, as 
well as those who were confused 
by omission of the last word, 
"lives," to go back and read it. 



1798 he was knighted and made 
an academician in the Royal 
Academy of Arts. 

Reminiscent of that of Rey- 
nolds, most of Beechey's work is 
unoriginal in style. It 'is 
described as "stolid prose, mod- 
est, gentle, and unassuming". Yet 
his portraits are praised for their 
"truth to nature and freshness of 
color". The second of these traits 
can be seen closely in the wind- 
brushed cheeks of the young 
lady in our portrait. 

Growing Collection 

The Treat Gallery, dedicated in 
1957, contains a constantly grow- 
ing collection of fine paintings 
and etchings. Perhaps the most 
notable among them are Thomas 
Gainsborough's John Henderson 
also given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Schmutz, together with Rem- 
brandt's etching, and Mattier's 
portrait of Mme Adelaide. Of 
special interest is the large col- 
lection of sketches by Marsden 
Hartley. A versatile artist and 
native of Lewiston, Hartley did 
his best work as inspired by the 
land and seascapes of Maine. 

Open 2 to 3 Daily 

Throughout the year there 
will be special exhibits in the 
Treat Gallery, but the show- 
room is open now from 2 to 3 
every afternoon. 



MEW VOICES 

By JOHN HOLT '64 
WHO'S AFRAID OF EDWARD 
ALBEE? 
It is always a delight to see 
passionate invectives. One per- 
son will rail against what he 
thinks is wrong, and then the 
other side will jump up and 
down and say that the criticism 
is ridiculous. In the midst of the 
flying fur, the third party looks 
on, taking sides where he agrees, 
then jumping over the fence to 
uphold a point of difference. 
Thesis 

Such was the clash in the N. Y. 
Times last summer between 
Joseph Hayes and Edward Al- 
bee. In the column usually re- 
served for the then vacationing 
Howard Taubman, Hayes wrote 
an essay entitled "Distorted 
Views", where he lamented 
the condition of contemporary 
American drama, saying that 
"the theatre presents us with a 
picture of man's hopelessness, 
lack of significance or value un- 
der an empty, scowling sky, his 
self-deluded stupidity, cupidity, 
contemptible puniness — his 
utter worthlessness." He went on 
to mention that "the pity is all 
for the self; the vision is person- 
al and private," and that the 
"avant-garde" dramatists are 
turning their own sickness into 
a universal malady. 

Overtly, the basic criticism 
was that this theatre does not 
correspond o the reality that is 
experienced by Americans, but 
is merely the psychoanalytical 
dissection* of non-representative, 
perverted minds — namely, Ed- 
ward Albee and Tennessee Wil- 
liams. So who wrote the answer 
in next week's column? Whee! 
Funsies! Edward Albee! 

Antithesis 

Speaking of dramatists such as 
Joseph Hayes (Calculated Risk, 
etc.), Albee mentioned the the- 
sis of "escapist commercialism" 
— the credos that Hayes stands 
for — "that the status quo must 
be maintained; that the theatre 
must be a dream palace of escape 
and never an arena of involve- 
ment; that any question raised 
must be given (by the fall of the 
third-act curtain) a pat answer; 
that our people do not have the 
fiber to withstand an attack on 
the most questionable of their 
values." 

"If the theatre must only, as 
Mr. Hayes puts it, 'reflect or ex- 
press the fundamental beliefs, 
feelings, convictions, aspirations' 
of our audiences, then, say I, 
down with all debate; down 
with all playwrights who have 
questioned the underpinning of 
all the fundamental beliefs, etc.; 
down with all playwrights who 
have not been content to reas- 
sure their audiences that all 
their values were dandy; down, 
then, say I, with Moliere, Ibsen, 
Aristophanes. Down with the 
theater as an educational as well 
as an entertainment medium. 
Down with the theater as a 
force for social and political ad- 
vancement. Down with the thea- 
ter! And up with the Fascism of 
a theater dedicated to satisfying 
the whimperings of a most un- 
worthy audience." 
Synthesis 

Well, what are we going to do? 
Let's be brave. Who's afraid of 
Edward Albee? Is that the ques- 
tion? Shouldn't it be, who's 
afraid of what the American civ- 
ilization has become? I think 
that is what he fears. That is 
what I fear. To ignore it is to 
perpetuate the evil. 



s > 



; i 



i » 



» 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



«3i3 
FIVE 



Committee Calls Attention 
To Graduate Study Grants 



The Faculty Committee on 
Graduate Study wishes to bring 
certain important foundation 
grants to the attention of all 
Seniors. November 1st is a usual 
deadline for receipt of nomina- 
tions by foundations. Seniors in- 
terested in being nominated 
should discuss the matter with 
Dean Healy not later than 
Wednesday, October 23rd. 

More detailed information con- 
cerning the following grants 
may be obtained at Dean Healy's 
office in Roger Williams Hall. 

The Danforth Graduate Fel- 
lowships are to assist men en- 
gaged in a pre-doctoral program 

in any field commonly taught 
in undergraduate colleges. Selec- 
tion is on the basis of outstand- 
ing academic ability, integrity, 
character and serious inquiry 
within the Christian tradition. 

The award is for tuition and 
fees plus $1500 for each of four 
years. Other national fellowships 
may be held concurrently. The 
deadline for nomination of two 
men by the college for support- 
ing papers and application for 
Graduate Record Examinations 
is November 1. 

Woodrow Wilson National Fel- 
lowships are granted to 1000 
prospective men or women grad- 
uate students each year for their 
first year of graduate study in 
the humanities, social sciences, 
natural sciences and mathematics 
where the candidate has a clear 
commitment to college teaching. 

The grant is for tuition and 
fees plus $1500. The deadline for 
nominations is October 31st and 
all supporting materials must be 
received by November 20th. 

Rhodes Scholarships are grant- 
ed to unmarried men between 
the ages of 18 and 24 judged to 
have qualities as laid down by 
Cecil Rhodes. 

Some definite quality of dis- 
tinction whether in intellect or 
character is the most important 




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requirement. The grant is for 
two years' study at Oxford and 
the value of a scholarship is 
about $2000 per year. Candidates 
may apply either for the state in 
which they reside or for any 
state in which they have re- 
ceived at least two years of col- 
lege training. Applications must 
be filed with the Secretary of 
the State Committee by Novem- 
ber 1st. 

The Rockefeller Brothers Theo- 
logical Fellowship Program of- 
fers male citizens under thirty 
years of age a "trial year" fel- 
lowship when the Fellow seeks 
to determine whether the minis- 
try should be his lifetime voca- 
tion. About 60 fellowships are 
awarded to those who are not 
now planning to attend graduate 
theological school, but would be 
willing, if awarded a fellowship, 
to attend such a school for one 
year in order to consider the or- 
dained ministry. There is no ob- 
ligation to continue beyond the 
first year. 

Fellows may apply to any 
Protestant seminary which is a 
fully accredited member of the 
American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools. The stipend pro- 
vides for room, board, tuition, 
fees and $600 for books and mis- 
cellaneous personal expenses. 

Men interested in this program 
should contact Prof. Miller for 
more details and advice, and 
should advise Dean Healy con- 
cerning their intention to apply 
for this fellowship. Nominations 
must be received in Princeton 
not later than November 20th. 




Inside the P. A- Office 



Invite Interested Students 
To New Newspaper Office 



Several Sundays ago, a Bates 
co-ed who will be forever un- 
named, walked about in West 
Parker for twenty minutes look- 
ing for the STUDENT office. 
Only when male voices started 
yelling over the sound of run- 
ning showers, did she realize 
that she had entered the build- 
ing through the wrong door. 

By the time this past Sunday 
rolled around, however, the staff 
was much better organized. The 
STUDENT has been awarded a 
room which has a door opening 
out on Andrews Road, between 
the East and West Parker en- 
trances. Formerly a gnome-den, 
the office has been completly 
renovated into a glittering and 
luxurious hive bearing no ves- 
tiges of its former dingy self. 
Only several electric meters 



What Price Glory? 



By 

BRADFORD F. ANDERSEN '66 

There is perhaps no life more 
open to view than that of the 
politician. The choice to enter 
public life exercises upon him 
the unfair responsibility of 
playing the pristine demi-god. 

A movie-star faces similar 
conditions, but by the nature of 
his occupation the politician 
must give up much more. Con- 
sider now what else a man must 
sacrifice to pursue the staff of 
leadership. 

On stage, etched in the yellow- 
white glare of lights the politi- 
cian stands hands outstretched 
above his head gathering ap- 
plause as it thunders down 
about him. Enjoying a great 
sense of exhilaration, but of 
lecessity a feeling of loneliness 
too. No matter how intimate the 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



moment, he realizes that as close 
as his associates are to him, 
they can never take that one 
step that puts them in his posi- 
tion. No, it is he and he alone 
who must make the decisions 
and survive the condemnation, 
or, if he is lucky, commendation. 

Politics can be one of the dirt- 
iest and yet, one of the most 
important occupations a person 
can undertake. Men of character, 
personifying our highest ideals, 
have entered the ring, full of the 
hopes and aspirations that build 
such a country as the United 
States of America only to find 
that they must "make their peace 
with city hall" hat in hand, 
humbling themselves before the 
kingpins that prey on patronage. 
Ghosts of their former selves, 
these men have been com- 
promised out of existence. 

Public service is a tough as- 
signment where the weak find it 
easy to succumb to cirrhosis of 
the liver. The terrific pressures 
arising out of insecurity and the 
necessity of keeping up with the 
social rat-race makes a large de- 



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(East always runs at least three 
times faster than West. The 
question of the day is why?) and 
an exquisite arrangement of sil- 
ver gray pipes are left to hint 
at the former role played by the 
STUDENT office. The staff is not 
complaining by any means, and 
as Dean Healy says, "A newspa- 
per office should have bare pipes 
— gives it atmosphere." 

The STUDENT still has open- 
ings for any man or woman 
anxious to work in pleasant, nay, 
magnificent surroundings, and 
interested in the newspaper. The 
personnel manager interviews 
applicants for these openings ev- 
ery Sunday morning between 
9:30 and 11:30 in the STUDENT 
office. 

mand on a man. 

I write this account not to 
evoke sympathy. For any man 
who enters the life of public at- 
tention understands he must 
deal with mass opinion. Rather I 
hoped to increase the apprecia- 
tion of what a man is subjected 
to in the course of service to his 
fellow citizen. 



The World Of Apn' On 
Theatre Screen Friday 1 

The fragile, dreamlike third 
film in Ray's trilogy of modern 
Hindu life, "The World of Apu" 
is highly romantic. Although 
there is a fundamental epical 
connection to "Pather Panchali" 
and "Apajarito" (the first two 
panels in Ray's triptych), Apu 
easily stands alone as a self-con- 
tained work of extraordinary 
sensitivity. 

The story concerns a student, 
too poor to continue his studies 
and too studious to accept man- 
ual labor, free to explore his 
talents as a writer. He attends 
the wedding of a girl whom he 
does not know, during which the 
groom is discovered to be in- 
sane. Hindu custom states that 
once the ceremony has begun, 
the bride must be married or 
lead a life of disgrace. Fate and 
Apu's generous heart make him 
the new bridegroom. In the next 
few months, Apu discovers a 
profound love for his young 
wife. , 

The idyll ends when fate inter- 
venes again, this time to take 
Apu's wife in childbirth. In an 
access of grief Apu wishes to ob- 
literate all that has gone before 
him. He refuses to see the child 
or his close friend, scatters the 
manuscript of his autobiography, 
and quits his job to wander aim- 
lessly about India. 

Apu is finally traced by his old 
friend and convinced to visit his 
child and accept the responsibil- 
ities of parenthood. The film 
ends when Apu meets his son 
and bows to the realization of 
existence. 

The greatness of this film is 
in Ray's evocation of mood and 
atmosphere. He is most success- 
ful at playing his sound images 
(birds, animals, a clock, a train, 
the rain) against the sharply 
naturalistic visual. Apu's love 
of his wife and affection for his 
friend are scenes of particular 
tenderness. 

"The World of Apu" has de- 
fects, notably its uneveness. 
Thus, the purists may object to 
its movement. It provides, how- 
ever, some of the most poignant 
moments in recent film history. 



.; Louis P. Nolin :. 




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SIX 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



Hagglund Sparks Soccer 
At Maine; Lose To Nichols 



By AL WILLIAMS '64 

The soccer team under new 
coach Roy Sigler apparently 
found itself last Saturday at 
Orono against the University of 
Maine after a disappointing 
opening game loss to Nichols 
Junior College. Spearheaded by 
Swedish Exchange student Dan 
Hagglund's hat trick the Bobcats 
trimmed the Black Bears 5-1 in 
a crisp display of both offensive 
and defensive soccer. The team 
against Nichols played very dis- 
organized soccer in losing 7-5 
after holding an apparently in- 
surmountable 5-3 lead. 
'Cats Explode 

Held to a 1-1 tie for two quar- 
ters against Maine the soccer 
team exploded for one goal in 
the third and three goals in the 
fourth quarter to bury the Pine 
Staters. Hagglund got the first 
Bobcat goal on a long twenty- 
yard kick outside the penalty 




Bob "Cat" Peek 



area. Hustling Bob Lanz got the 
second score in the third quar- 
ter and the Garnet team was 
never led. 

After Hagglund's second tally 
Steve Barron headed a ball 
through the goal to make the 
score 4-1. Hagglund's last tally 
was close to the sensational side. 
He kicked the ball over the 
center halfback's head and boot- 
ed it between the posts before 
the ball touched the ground. 
Freshman Bruce Petersen played 
a strong game, getting credit for 
two assists. 

Strong Defense 

Center halfback George Beebe 
and fullback Bob Thompson 
played their usual strong games 
defensively. Coach Sigler must 
have been pleased ta see his de- 
fense jell as expected from pre- 
season scrimmages and his line 
play as well as it did. 

Last Wednesday at Nichols 
was an entirely different story. 
The Nichols' team style thor- 
oughly confused the Bobcat of- 
fense. Individuals may have 
played well but teamwork was 
decidedly lacking. In all fair- 
ness to the team it was psycho- 
logically demoralizing to lose 
goalie James Oneymeluke with 
a shoulder injury. There is a 
good possibility that Oneyme- 
lukwe will be lost for the sea- 
son. 

Lanz, the high scoring center 
forward, accounted for two of 
the Bates goals. Hagglund 
banged home one tally. Fresh- 
man Petersen playing in his first 
game got the fourth tally while 
Barron completed the Bates 
scoring. 

With a 5-3 lead, Oneymelukwe 
was kicked in the shoulder. 
Nichols closed the gap to 5-4. 
Two penalty kicks gave the 
junior college men a lead that 
they never relinquished. 



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Phone 782-0141 



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Tel. 784-5481 



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50 Ash Street. Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
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Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



By AL HARVIE '65 

While the soccer team was 
trampling the University of 
Maine at Orono, and the football 
team was blanking W.P.I, on 
Garcelon field, Coach Walt Slo- 
venski's cross-country team was 
literally running away with its 
meet with W.P.I. 

Sets New Mark 

It was the same song and 
dance as last week for the hill 
and dalers, but this week there 
was a much faster tempo. In- 
credible Karl McKusick, last 
week's 'Cat of the Week, made 
it two first places in as many 
outings as he remains undefeat- 
ed in collegiate competition. Cut- 
ting 37 seconds off his last 
week's winning effort, McKu- 
sick established a new course 
and Bates College record of 22 
min., 54 sec. The former record 
was set last year by Jerry Ellis 
of the U. of M. With the cheers 
of the fans gathered for the 
Dad's Day Game urging them 
on, Karl sprinted home thirty 
seconds ahead of Capt. Eric Sil- 
verberg whose second place time 
also bettered the Bates College 
record. 

Finishing in the third and 
fourth spots was the same duo 
that captured these places in last 
week's win over Colby. This 
week, however, the tables were 
reversed as the fast improving 
Finn Wilhelmsen moved into 
third place with Ken Trufant 
close behind him. 

1-2 Punch 

Coach Slovenski said after the 
meet that "the fine improvement 
of Wilhelmsen, together with 
McKusick and Silverberg, gives 
Bates the best one-two-three 



punch I've seen here at Bates." 
Slovenski added, however, that 
he would like to see more "pack- 
running". "The goal for any good 
cross-country team," he re- 
marked, "is to have its first and 
fifth men finish within a minute 
of each other." This goal does 
not appear to be too far in the 
future as there were many ex- 
cellent improvements over last 
week's meet. Junior Basil Rich- 
ardson, for instance, finished sev- 
enth man for Bates against Col- 
by and this week moved into the 
scoring column by placing fifth 
man for Bates. 

Engineers' Bridge Collapses 

W.P.I, was not able to keep 
with the front-runners, but 
placed men in the fifth, sixth, 
seventh, eighth, and twelfth pos- 
itions. 

The real test for the 'Cats will 
come this Saturday as they 
journey to Orono to meet the 
University of Maine and the 
University of Vermont in a tri- 



angular meet. Last year on our 
home course, the Black Bears 
routed us with a perfect 15-50 
score. The cross-country team 
has not met the University of 
Vermont before, but we have 
been successful against them in 
other track seasons. 

In a junior varsity meet Sat- 
urday morning a well-balanced 
Waltham High School team 
downed the Bobkittens 16-49. 

Varsity results: 

Bates 



McKusick 


1 


Silverberg 


2 


Wilhelmsen 


3 


Trufant 


4 


Richardson 


9 




19 


W.PJ. 




Monks 


5 


Hoestery 


6 


Weckel 


7 


McGee 


8 


Stone 


12 




38 




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BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 



SEVEN 



Bobcat Of The Week 

Out of a week filled with Gar- 
net victories and many Garnet 
standouts, the STUDENT sports 
staff, after much deliberation, 
turns to football for its weekly 
honor. The person named as 
Bobcat of the Week is sophomore 
John Yuskis, a history major 
from New Britain, Conn. 

Second Time Awarded 

This is the second time John 
has been selected for the weekly 
prize; only the first time it was 
his prowess in baseball which 
earned him the olive wreath of 
acclaim. This week his football 
proficiency is singled out. 

Against Worcester Poly Tech 
last Saturday, John lived up to 
his renowned versatility by lead- 
ing all groundgainers in the 
contest with a total of 110 yards 
rushing out of twenty-three car- 
ries. Yuskis also scored the sec- 
ond of the two Garnet scores on 
a fourth down play from the 




(Talbot photo) 



twelve yard line. With his of- 
fensive ability alone enough to 
gain him honor, John also 
proved a formidable asset in the 
defensive secondary. 

Many Things Well 

In the words of his coach, 
"John does many things well. 
He is one of our most consistent 
ballplayers." It is for these qual- 
ities, which were displayed so 
well last week, that we congrat- 
ulate John. 



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By DON KING '64 

The intramural season began 
officially this week as the B and 
C leagues dominated the action. 
The A league remains dormant 
until today. 

Big Upset Termed Fluke 

In B league play, the J. B. 
squad invaded the Off-Campus 
"Playboy Juniors", upsetting the 
pre-game favorites 12-6. Judg- 
ing by reports, the "pint-sized 
Playboys" were certainly justi- 
fied in calling this game a "fluke" 
and were obviously victims of 
the fates. The two teams battled 
to a 6-6 deadlock before a clod 
from J.B., identified as Joe 
Matzkin, stumbled into the Play- 
boys' end zone awaiting a pass 
from Mulfardo. He appeared to 
be adequately covered as three 
staunch off-campus heroes 
knocked the pigskin from his 
outstretched arms. However, the 
J.B. boys were not to be denied 
this day, as the projectile petered 
precariously into Pete Peterson's 
paws to account for the final 
points in the ball game. 

The first J. B. score came as 
Lou (I'm the greatest) Mulfardo 
took to the airways and connect- 
ed with Brad Ackerman for the 
six-pointer. 
Game Tied 

The "Peanut Playboys" struck 
paydirt as Stu Field slipped be- 
hind the J.B. secondary and 
tucked in Scott Wilkin's bomb to 
notch the count. 

The Off-Campus line of John 
(the Body) Bart, Bill Turner, 
and Steve Schaffer were im- 
permable as a result of their 
bllazing speed. Mention should 
also be made of the very fine job 
Pete Swanson turned in at quar- 
terback for the losers as he 
plugged the gaps in the J.B. sec- 
ondary with completions to Paul 
Goodwin. 

Ken Reiss did a commendable 
job on defense for J.B. as Ed- 
wards, Ackerman and Mulfardo 
led the offensive attack. All these 
fine performances aside, how- 
ever, the J.B. team owes a good 
part of their victory to the clev- 
er coaching of Ian Pravda. 

J.B. Sweeps Both 

The only other contest played 
was a C league tilt featuring 
East Parker and J.B.., as J.B. 
came out on top of a 12-6 
squeaker. Jeff Scott intercepted 
an East Parker pass and hotfoot- 
ed it 50 yards for the first score. 
Later in the second half Scott hit 
teammate Bill Hiss in the end 



Cheerleader 



Gridsters Journey To Vermont; 
Meet Twice Beaten Middlebury 



The other Junior member of 
this year's cheering squad is an- 
other very talented young lady 
— introducing Miss Andy Buck. 
Andy, who is from Manhuset, 
New York, is, like Lynn Avery, 
another very friendly, smiling, 
and much - fun - to- be- with - 
type person. 

Stu-G V.P. 

Andy, a member of this year's 
outstanding cheering squad, has 
been with the team since her 
freshman year. A proctor at 
Page, she also holds the post of 
vice-president of Stu-G. 

Miss Buck, a government ma- 
jor, plans to go into foreign ser- 
vice. Possibly that is why she 
enjoyed last summer so much 
when she spent it abroad. Most 
outstanding in her memories of 
the countries she hopes to work 
in, are the diplomatic policies 
that she and "Kinney" devised 
while visiting the Hofbrau 
House! 

Likes to Ski and Sail 

Outside activities include a 
very avid interest, complete with 
a passable ability in skiing. 
Andy spends nearly every week- 
end visiting the different ski 
resorts in this area. Another 
sport of which she is very fond 
is sailing. Unfortunately, she 
claims, "I've never done any 
better than last position!" As a 
result of her obvious talents, the 
STUDENT feels that Andy is 
just being modest. Consequent- 
ly, Andy, because of your many 
talents, please take a bow. 

zone to ice it. 

The game of the week will be 
played today as the A league 
Off-Campus Playboys are pre- 
dicted to crush the Roger Bill 
peons for their first victory in 



By LEIGH CAMPBELL '64 

The Bates Bobcats, having 
broken into the victory column 
against Worcester Tech, will try 
to even their football record Sat- 
urday, battling Middlebury Col- 
lege at Porter Field in Middle- 
bury, Vermont. The Panthers of, 
Coach Duke Nelson will enter 
the game with a 1-2 record, the 
same as Bates. They have beat- 
en Worcester Tech and lost to 
Wesleyan and Williams. Middle- 
bury has 21 lettermen, with good 
experience at every position ex- 
cept the vital quarterback slot. 
Last year they had a fine team, 
losing only to Bates and Wil- 
liams in seven games. 

Look for Ground Game 

It would appear that Coach Bob 
Hatch of Bates will again be 
looking for his opponent to stay 
mainly on the ground offensive- 
ly. Middlebury has a fullback to 
compare with the Bobcats' Tom 
Carr in 235-pound John King- 
man of Englewood, Colorado. 
He scored the Panthers' only 
touchdown in last Saturday's 16- 
8 loss to Williams. Another 
strong running threat should be 
Co-Captain David Holmes, a se- 



nior halfback from Bethesda, 
Maryland. Mike Maclntyre has 
been the quarterback so far, but 
he had no experience last sea- 
son. His run scored the two- 
point conversion after Kingman's 
touchdown. 

Many Veterans 

The line, while not really 
large, is full of veterans, among 
them Co-Captain Don Elmore, a 
guard from Stratham, New 
Hampshire. Other men to watch 
are end Larry Noyes of Cape 
Elizabeth, Maine, and center 
Dave Hutchinson of Laconia, 
New Hampshire. 

This week's game will be the 
fourteenth in the series between 
Bates and Middlebury. The Bob- 
cats have won seven, the Pan- 
thers three, and there have been 
three ties. Middlebury's last win 
was in 1959. The games in 1960 
and 1961 were both thrillers, 
ending in ties of 14-14 and 20-20. 
Last year Bates scored a last- 
period touchdown to win 12-6 at 
Garcelon Field. Another close 
and exciting game is looked for 
this year, and the long trip to 
Vermont should be worth it for 
Bates fans. 




John Yuskis gains yardage 



(Peek photo) 



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quest of an unblemished season. 
Interested Refs 

I have been requested- to re- 
mind those of you interested in 
being intramural refs to contact 
either Jim Fine or your dorm 
representative. 

The Off-Campus Playboy of 
the Week goes to Steve Barron 
who has yet to touch a football. 

Lewiston Fair Grounds 

Lady Dora — Has been prepped 
for an easy win. 

Ft. W. Pick — Has early speed, 
might forget to stop. 

Ency Volo — Needs only loose 
rein in right spot. 

Stormy 'Star — Get set to click 
with a classy winner. 

Coast Dispatch — Due and over- 
due for run to winner's cir- 
cle. 



Milt's Esquire — Stout stretch 
runner can be hard to han- 
dle. 

Dicky MacWorthy — In clever 
hands looking for the right 
spot. 

*Best Bet— Milt's Esquire in the 
8th. 



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EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 16, 1963 
_____________________ 



Hatchmen Outclass Worcester, 23-0 

Yuskis, Carr Lead Ground Game; 
Cat Line Play Improves Vastly 




With NICK BASBAJNES 

I think that with my predicting average being 1.000, I'll 
quit while I'm ahead (in more ways than one). Actually, 
though, I can't understand how anyone could ever have bet 
against Jimmy Brown (post-game I-told-you-so). The game 
lived up to all expectations in being a thriller, and the famous 
on-the-field feud between Brown and Sam Huff of the Giants 
was successfully extended through their respective powers 
of perfection. As most of you perhaps know, both of these 
men played against each other in college (Brown at Syracuse, 
Huff at West Virginia) and the foundations upon which they 
built their formidable reputations were there molded. Off 
the field they are the best of friends. On the field they are 
determined competitors. A great example of the rewards of 
athletics. 

Not to wander too far from the idea that merit rewards, 
what did you think of the Garnet's victory over Worcester? 
After having seen films of the Northeastern and Norwich 
games, and then turning to the real thing Saturday, it was 
apparent that a new spark had been kindled in the Bobcats. 
In what was considered to be the crucial game of the cam- 
paign, our boys responded splendidly. The account of the 
game to the right will give you an idea as to the extent of 
their victory; but words themselves can't really express the 
gratification of this endeavor. Had the Bobcats lost this game 
they would have been confronted by an omen of remaining 
disasters. But now with a win, and an unquestioned one at 
that, the 'Cats can look confidently towards their other op- 
ponents. They can look with the confidence that their backs 
are running with unusual dexterity and agility. That their 
line has formed a unit composed of competent and precise 
individuals. The headline now tells of outstanding men, not 
shoddy and uncertain play. The boys worked hard; and I 
think that the fruit of their harvest is far from being ex- 
hausted. 

Each week the coaches, in their viewing of the game films, 
utilize a point system in order to score the defensive prow- 
ess of each man. It works something like this. If you make 
an unassisted tackle you get three points. A tackle by two 
men rewards two points respectively. Either good pursuit 
or being involved in a "gang" tackle yields one point. Added 
attractions such as a pass interception, a recovered fumble, 
or a "bonus" type tackle gives four points. A missed tackle, 
however, results in a loss of three points. Such a system is 
invaluable in giving the coaches an indication of who is do- 
ing the job of where help is needed, plus an overall picture of 
a man's or team's consistency. Such a method is also help- 
ful in scouting other teams, as one can see where a team's de- 
fensive weaknesses and strong points lie. The Bates record 
is held by Howie Vandersea '63, now playing with the Port- 
land Sea Hawks. He scored seventy points in a game against 
Maine. 

Bates proficiency was evidenced in other sports this past 
Saturday, also. The cross-country team continued its sweep- 
ing success against W.P.I., and the soccer team, in state series 
competition, pummelled the hapless bears of Maine. The 
team work in both of these sports was outstanding. Most of 
us in the football stands Saturday were able to get a first 
hand glimpse of frosh record holder Karl McKusick in his 
time-shattering bid. But right behind him was the rest of 
his teammates. Working together they swept the meet. And 
the soccer team, putting out their spirit in the form of a unit, 
earned themselves a savoring victory. 



By DON DELMORE '64 

The Bobcats bounced back 
from two straight losses and 
easily downed Worcester Tech 
13-0 in a game played Saturday 
at Garcelon Field. The contest 
was really much more one-sided 
than the score indicates. Time 
and again the superb Bates de- 
fensive line and secondary 
stalled any Worcester penetra- 
tions. The Engineers failed to 
cross the Bates forty-eight yard 
line in first half action. This in- 
spired line play, coupled with 
the powerful running of full- 
back Tom Carr and elusive half- 
back John Yuskis paved the way 
for the first victory of the cam- 
paign. 

First Quarter Scoreless 

The first quarter was played 
to a scoreless tie. Bates threat- 
ened, but a fumble on the Wor- 
cester twelve yard line momen- 
tarily delayed the inevitable. 
Tech ran out the clock and the 
score stood 0-0 as the gun 
sounded ending the first period. 

Bates began the first scoring 
drive of the afternoon late in 
the second quarter when John 
Yuskis took a Worcester punt on 
his own thirty and returned to 
the Tech forty-three on a sen- 
sational run. On second down 
quarterback Bill MacNevin 
dropped a thirty-five yard pass 
into the outstretched arms of 
left end Grant Farquhar, who 
was brought down on the four. 
Carr smashed through for the 
touchdown on the second play 
from scrimmage with 1:48 re- 
maining in the first half. The 
conversion failed and the 'Cats 
held a 6-0 lead as the first half 
drew to a close. 

Tech Outclassed in 2nd Half 

The Bobcats continued to con- 
trol the ball in the second half 
as the Engineers were com- 
pletely outclassed. A strong wind 
hurt the passing attack of both 
squads but the 'Cats successful- 

SPORTS THIS WEEK 
Wednesday. Oct. 16 
Soccer here with Nasson 

Saturday, Oct. 19 
Football at Middlebury 
Soccer here with Brandeis 
Cross Country at Maine (Ver- 
mont) 

Tuesday, Oct. 22 

Soccer here with Bowdoin 

Wednesday, Oct. 23 

Cross Country at M. t T. 
(B. G.)i Boston 



ly took to the ground and out- 
gained the visitors, 210 yards to 
77 yards. 

Captain Paul Planchon came 
through with a key forty-three 
yard punt that rolled dead on the 
Worcester five yard line as 
fourth-quarter action began. The 
'Cat defense held once again and 
forced Tech to punt on fourth 
down. A strong rush resulted in 
a poor kick, carrying only to the 
Worcester twenty-three. Carr 
picked up another first down, 
bolting through the middle for 
eleven yards. On fourth down, 
fleet halfback Yuskis smashed 
off left tackle, cut to his right 
and broke into the open. John 
crossed the goal line standing 
up, giving Bates a 12-0 lead 
with 11:10 remaining in the 
game. Wayne Pangburn made 
the conversion on a kick that 



went over the crossbar to make 
the score 13-0. 
'Cats Sweep Stax 

The remainder of the fourth 
period was scoreless but the 
Bobcats continued to outplay, 
outhustle, and outclass the 
shocked Engineers. It was indeed 
refreshing to see the revitalized 
'Cats bounce back so strongly 
after crushing defeats at the 
hands of Norwich and Northeast- 
ern. A glance at the statistics 
presented below will indicate 
just how much Worcester was 
outplayed by the fired-up Bob- 
cats. It now seems safe to say 
that the fast-improving Bates 
line, along with the backfield 
combo of "Mr. Outside" Yuskis 
and "Mr. Inside" Carr, will be 
more than ready for their next 
test this Saturday at Middle- 
bury. 




John Schatz '64 hauls down Engineer (Peek photo) 



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GARNET 'CATS TOPPLE TECH 

Bates WPI 

First downs 15 8 

Net yards rushing 210 77 

Passes attempted 11 n 

Completed 3 4 

Had intercepted 1 l 

Passing yardage 53 38 

Punts 6-35 7-35 

Fumbles l 3 

Fumbles lost 1 1 

Penalties 5-35 5-45 



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10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 
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DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 



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Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 
Auburn, Maine 
Dial 783-2044 



Hates 




Student 



Vol. XC, No. 5 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



By Subscription 



> 



Student Senate Members 



MEN 

Seniors 
Robert Ahern 
Douglas Dobson 
David Parmelee 
Paul Sadlier 

Juniors 
James Aikman 
Ned Brooks 
Howard Dorfman 

Sophomores 
Alan Cruickshank 
Max Steinheimer 



WOMEN 

Seniors 
Carol Kinney 
Marilyn Fuller 
Margaret Ziegler 
Margery Zimmerman 

Juniors 
Prudence Grant 
Sally M. Smyth 
Donna Whitney 

Sophomores 
Carol Brown 
Chris Christensen 



Grad Study Committee Points To 
Increase In Senior Applicants 



A survey made by the Facul- 
ty Committee on Graduate 
Study indicates that more mem- 
bers of the Class of 1964 have 
tentative plans to do graduate 
work than for any previously 
surveyed class. About 75% of 
the men and 40% of the women 
would like to continue their edu- 
cation in either academic or ap- 
plied areas. These tentative 
plans of the senior class were 

Free Maine Concerts 
Available To Bates 

The Concert-Lecture Commit- 
tee points out that all Bates Col- 
lege undergraduates are mem- 
bers of the Lewiston-Auburn 
Community Concerts Association 
and as such may enjoy all the 
privileges of membership. In ad- 
dition to free admission to all 
concerts given by the association 
in Lewiston, members may at- 
tend without charge any Com- 
munity Concerts program given 
elsewhere. This school year there 
are concerts scheduled in Port- 
land, Augusta, Rumford, and 
Bath as follows: 

Portland r— October 18, Lili 
Chookasian; November 21, New 
York Brass Quintet; January 15, 
Robert Shaw Chorale and Or- 
chestra; February 21, Philhar- 
monic Hungarica; April 23, Ron- 
ald Turini. 

Augusta — October 5, be Pour 
Chorus; January 5, Philharmonia 
Hungarica (Sunday matinee at 
4 p. m.) ; March 4, Beaux Arts 
Trio. 

Rumford — October 7, Arch- 
er & Gile; November 9, Ronald 
Turini; March 17, Margaret 
Tynes; May 5, Varel & Bailly. 

Bath — November 21, Yannu- 
la Pappas; January 18, Jean 
Cassadesus; April 17, Greenwich 
Quartet. 

Student identification cards 
are required for student admis- 
sion to Lewiston concerts. How- 
ever, a regular membership card 
is needed for admission else- 
where. Students planning to at- 
tend out of town concerts should 
secure their membership cards 
from Mr. Annett's office in Chase 
Hall. Membership cards should 
be retained because they are 
valid for the entire 1963-64 con- 
cert season. 



indicated last April when the 
then juniors registered for se- 
nior courses. 

In recent years, somewhat 
fewer than 50% of the graduat- 
ing class have actually entered 
graduate schools, although close 
to 60% had signified a desire to 
do so. 

Seniors Act Soon 

The Faculty Committee on 
Graduate Study points out that 
Seniors should turn thought into 
action by seeking advice from 
appropriate faculty members as 
soon as possible. 

A second step is to learn as 
much as possible about the vari- 
ous graduate schools offering in- 
struction in the area of one's in- 
terest. An excellent reference 
book for this purpose is 'A 
Guide to Graduate Study" by 
Ness which is available at the 
reserve desk in the library. 

A third step is to write to half 
a dozen thoughtfully-selected 
schools for catalogues and appli- 
cation forms. After studying 
each of these, and with faculty 
advice, one might prepare to 
apply to three or more represent- 
ing an appropriate range in view 
of one's academic reach and 
study objectives. 

In many instances it will be 
necessary to arrange to take 
Graduate Record Examinations. 
The nature of these examina- 
tions and when and where they 
are given is described in appli- 
cation forms available in the 
Guidance and Placement Office. 

Provide Academic Transcript 

A graduate school applicant is 
always required to provide a 
transcript of his academic rec- 
ord and letters of recommenda- 
tion from faculty members. Some 
transcripts can be strengthened 
by sending them after first term 
Senior grades can be included. 
Letters of recommendation are 
sometimes a deciding factor in 
the acceptance or rejection of an 
applicant. 

Students expecting to do grad- 
uate work in an academic dis- 
cipline will normally find the 
most helpful advice from facul- 
ty members in the corresponding 
undergraduate department. On 
the other hand, a student ex- 
pecting to do graduate work in 
an applied area should seek 
(Continued on page three) 



Director Outlines 
Lewiston Plan For 
Urban Renewal 

One thousand cities in the 
United States have established 
authorities to renew and rede- 
velop their blighted downtown 
areas. Mr. William McDonald, 
co-director of Urban Renewal in 
Lewiston, discussed the prob- 
lems and progress of this city 
last Thursday with the Gould 
Political Affairs Club. 

The Urban Renewal Authority 
of Lewiston has been in exist- 
ence for two years. The federal 
government at present has given 
%1 l / 2 billion dollars to municipal- 
ities across the country; $1,800,- 
000 will be contributed to the 
Lewiston pilot project. Lewiston 
will be expected to pay the re- 
mainder of the cost which is an 
estimated $2,800,000. 

The Lewiston program will 
deal first with the area bounded 
by Lisbon, Ash, Oak, and Bart- 
lett Streets. Public housing is 
planned to accommodate the el- 
derly persons whose income is 
less than $150 per month. Other 
families are considered able to 
provide themselves with ade- 
quate apartments which are 
available in Lewiston. 

The Urban Renewal Authori- 
ty plans to buy the land under 
the right of eminent domain, re- 
imbursing the present owners 
according to an appraisal which 
both parties consider fair. Build- 
ings will then be destroyed. The 
success of the project depends 
upon the resale of the vacant 
land. Until the land is ready to 
be sold, the Authority must rely 
on "expressions of interest." 

Opposition to the program 
comes mainly from three sourc- 
es. Businessmen in the doomed 
areas object to the temporary, 
possibly permanent, loss of busi- 
ness. Real estate interests are 
opposed to low-cost public hous- 
ing. Some of the families now 
residing in the sub-standard 
houses of the area feel that 
planned relocation is denying 
them freedom of choice. 



MASS LECTURE 

301 

Classical Art 

Oct. 25 Dean Zerby 
Thucydides, Grk. Drama 

Nov. 4 Dr. Muller 

Nov. 8 Mr. Walsh 
Plato 

Nov. 18 Hour Exam 
Nov. 22 Dr. Niehaus 
Aristotle 
Dec. 2 Dr. Goldat 
Dec. 6 Dr. Goldat 
401 

Political Theory: Baroque Ai't 

Oot. 28 Dr. Thumm 

Nov. 1 Dr. Niehaus 
The Enlightenment 

Nov. 11 Mr. Walsh 

Nov. 15 Dr. Jackman 
The Enlightenment 

Nov. 25 Dr. Chances 

Nov. 29 Dr. Caron 
Hume and Kant 

Dec. 9 Hour Exam 

Dec. 13 Dr. D' Alfonso 



Bates Awards Five 
Honorary Degrees 

Bates College will award five honorary degrees at its Cen- 
tennial Dedicatory Convocation this Saturday. The degrees, 
citing distinguished service, are to be conferred on Mrs. Bar- 
bara Tuchman, and Messrs. Alfred C. Fuller, Fred M. Hechin- 
ger, Eugene F. O'Neill, and William C. Paley. 

Mrs. Tuchman, author of the* 
Pulitzer Prize novel The Guns 



of August, is to receive the 




W. S. Paley of CBS 



honorary degree Doctor of Let- 
ters. Mr. O'Neill will receive a 
Doctor of Science degree in rec- 
ognition of his achievements as 
head of Bell Telephone Com- 
pany's project "Telestar". New 
York Times education editor 
Fred Hechinger will receive a 
Doctor of Laws degree. The col- 
lege will confer a Doctor of 
Laws degree on Alfred Fuller, 
founder of the Fuller Brush 
Company. Columbia Broadcast- 
ing System board chairman Wil- 
liam Paley is also to be honored 
with a Doctor of Laws degree. 

Mr. Paley will deliver the con- 
vocation address dedicating the 
Little Theater, the Maintenance 
Center, Carnegie Science Hall, 
and Hathorn Hall. 

The remaining four 'guests will 
participate in the Centennial 
Panel previewed in last week's 
STUDENT. 



Homecoming Program 



Friday, Oct. 25 
1:30 Soccer with Maine 
3:00 Panel Discussion in Lit- 
tle Theater: Conserva- 
tism vs. Liberalism 
7: 30 Back - to - Bates Football 
Rally 

9:00 Play: Winsome Winnie 
Open House in Chase Hall 
Saturday, Oct. 26 



10:00 Dedicatory Convocation in 
. Chapel 
1:30 Football with Maine 
7:45 Play: Winsome Winnie 
9:30 Back-to-Bates Dance 
Orchestral Music 
Admission $1.25 per 
person 
Sunday, Oct. 27 
9:00 Chapel Service 



Economists Relate Experiences 
In Various Discipline Fields 



The economics panel was com- 
prised of Richard L. Breault of 
the Department of Budget for 
the Federal Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration; Julian Freedman, 
of the Exchange Projects and 
Planning Department of the 
American Stock Exchange; Dr. 
Paul W. MacAvoy, assistant pro- 
fessor of economics at MIT; E. 
Robert Kinney, .president of 
Gortons of Gloucester. Each of 
the panelists discussed his own 
field and the opportunities avail- 
able to the economics student in 
that career. 

Mr. Breault, speaking of the 
opportunities in government, 
stressed the advantages of early 
retirement benefits, yearly sal- 
ary increases, low price life in- 
surance policies and job secur- 
ity as inducements for entering 
the area of government. 

He hastened to add, however, 
that though government salaries 
assured the worker of steady in- 
creases there was a limit on the 
salary scale in high positions. He 
felt that government would 
eventually have to raise the sal- 



ary of their top personnel in or- 
der to stop their exodus into pri- 
vate enterprise. 

Mr. Freedman spoke of the op- 
portunities on Wall Street, 
stressing the chances for further 
advancement by working during 
the day and attending night 
school for a post-graduate degree 
in business. 

Academic Economist 

Dr. MacAvoy, representing the 
academic economist, used simple 
supply and demand analysis to 
explain the openings in his field. 
He divided the profession into 
two groups, those that teach and 
those that enter business as busi- 
ness economists. The present 
supply of about 350 Ph.D. grad- 
uates a year is equal to the de- 
mand. 

In looking at the future de- 
mand, taking into consideration 
the increased emphasis on a col- 
lege and a post-graduate educa- 
tion and the influx of the post- 
war babies into our nation's col- 
leges, he forecasted a demand 
for about 500 Ph.D. economists 
in a few years. 



s 



9$ 

TWO 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



Forensic Forecasts 

By SUE STANLEY '64 
The action is beginning to 
speed up in the debate room 
now. Last week the varsity try- 
outs were held and it looks as if 
it will be a good season with 
some top-notch debating. Before 
introducing the underclassmen, 
however, an apology is due 
Norm Bowie '64 whose name was 
omitted last week in the run- 
down of the senior debaters. 
Norm is president of his class 
as well as being active in the 
Chase Hall Dance Committee. A 
Philosophy Honors major, Norm 
has been a consistent debater 
these last three years and con- 
tributed much to the debate 
squad. 

The underclassmen who have 
returned for another year on the 
debating circuit are Jeff Rouault 
'65, Steve Shaffer '65, Norm Da- 
vis '65, Max Steinheimer '66, 
Richard Rosenblatt '66, George 
Strait '66, Roy Horwitz '66. 
Freshman Debaters 

The freshman tryouts were 
held two weeks ago and those 
making the team are James Fil- 
akosky, Robert Cornell, Alan 
Lewis, Walter Pearson, Geoff 
Boyer, and three young ladies, 
J a y n e Armstrong, Charlotte 
Singer, and Dariel Shrively. 

On November 16 teams will be 
traveling to Colby College in 
Waterville for a practice tour- 
ney for the Maine colleges, and 
on November 22-23 will be the 
annual trip to the University of 
Vermont in Burlington. The 
Easterns, which Bates won last 
year, are to be held on Decem- 
ber 13-14 in New Jersey this 
year so the varsity is hard at 
work getting in shape for that 
tournament. 

Another note of interest: The 
annual Bates Oratorical Contest 
will be held on December 2 at 
7:00 p.m. in the Little Theater 
Three prizes of $40.00, $25.00 and 
$15.00 will be awarded for first, 
second, and third places respec- 
tively. The awards come from 
the Charles Sumner Libby '76, 
Memorial Fund. Those interested 
should contact Prof. Quimby or 
Miss Schaeffer as soon as possi 
ble since the preliminary round 
is on November 26 at 4:00 p.m. 
in Room 300, Pettigrew. 



Tonight 

7:30 THE OBSERVING EYE — 

Gilbert E. Merrill ex- 
plores "The Timeless Tur- 
tle". 

3:00 LYRICS AND LEGENDS— 

"Traditional Ballads." Dr. 
McEdward Leach returns 
with Jean Richie of Ken- 
tucky, outstanding singer 
of folk songs. 
B:30 COURT OF REASON — A 
weekly discussion of op- 
posing ideas and opinions 
which surround current 
controversial subjects. 
Tomorrow Night 
7:30 FOCUS ON BEHAVIOR — 
"The Chemistry of Be- 
havior." The effect of 
psychoactive drugs on be- 
havior. 

3:00 SCIENCE REPORTER with 
John Fitch. "Looking Back 
on the Bomb" with Dr. 
Vannevar Bush, one of the 
nation's leaders in science 
and engineering. 

8:30 YOUTH WANTS TO 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main Si. Lewiston 

Next to Bus Terminal 



+ + 

"HOTEL HOLLY" 

BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 

Main Street Lewiston 

+ + 



LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

* 10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 

DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 

- Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



WCBB Features 



KNOW — A panel of high 
school youth will question 
William R. Anderson. 
9:00 THE OPEN MIND — "How 
Serious is the Situation?" 
Weekly public affairs pro- 
gram. 

Friday Night 

6:00 DISCOVERY — "Too Small 
to See." The microscope 
• literally opens up the 
secrets of the nature of 
living things 

7:30 THE HISTORY OF AMER- 
ICAN PHILOSOPHY — 

"Royce and Absolute Ideal- 
ism." Philosophy course 
for teachers. 

8:00 ART OF SEEING —"Stretch- 
ing the Moment." Mr. 
Haas traces the idea of 
capturing motion in time. 

8:30 NATIONAL SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA, under the 
direction of Howard Mit- 
chell, performs works of 
Mozart, Saint-Saens and 
Beethoven. James Bus well 
IV is guest violinist. 



Guidance 



INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Dean Robert S. Moore from 
Chicago Theological Seminary 
will be on campus to interview 
men and women interested in 
graduate study and career oppor- 
tunities in Religious Service on 
Monday, October 28. 

The AMOS TUCK SCHOOL 
OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRA- 
TION (Dartmouth College) will 
have a representative, Mr. 
George P. Drowne, Jr., on cam- 
pus, Friday, November 1. He will 
interview men interested in a 
two year program of graduate 
education. 

All interested students should 
sign up immediately at the 

GARNET 

The GARNET is now ac- 
cepting contributions for the 
Winter 1963 issue. Submit 
all material to any staff 
member: Marilyn Fuller, ed- 
itor; Priscilla Clark '66, Ann 
Noble '65, Derek Hurst '65. 
Richard Hoyt '64, or box 115. 



Guidance and Placement Office 
for these two interviews. 

The PAUL REVERE LIFE IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY has re- 
cently informed the Guidance 
and Placement Service of cur- 
rent opportunities in that organ- 
ization. There are openings in 
the Management Training Pro- 
gram for trainees to start in Life 
and Health Underwriting, Claim 
Examining, Data Processing, 
Planning and Methods and 
Group Insurance Sales. Starting 
salaries are in the area of $6,000 
plus comprehensive and liberal 
Company benefits. Anyone in- 
terested should write immediate- 
ly to Mr. S. J. Lukens, Person- 
nel Manager, Paul Revere Life 
Insurance Company, Worcester 
8, Mass. 



PRE-LAW NOTICE 

Any underclassmen inter- 
ested in law school should 
see either Dr. Muller or 
David Williams '65. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE 
SALUTE: PETE WILDE 

Almost 90,000 telephone customers in and around Haver- 
hill, Massachusetts, rely on the supervisory ability of a 
man few of them will ever meet. He is Pete Wilde (B.A., 
1960), Assistant District Traffic Superintendent for New 
England Telephone in Haverhill. 

It is not unusual for a man of Pete's ability to rise to 
such a promotion as swiftly as he did. Pete had made an 
impressive start on an earlier assignment in Fitchburg 



COMPANIES 




where he was responsible for the service rendered by nearly 
150 telephone operators. The capable job he did in Fitch- 
burg earned him a chance for further training, a good raise, 
and his latest promotion. 

Pete Wilde, like many young men, is impatient to make 
things happen for his company and himself. There are 
few places where such restlessness is more welcomed or 
rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 




I 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



THREE 



KellnerNotesSociological 
Differences In Education 



By JUDY MARDEN '66 
Replacing Professor Jonitis of 
the Sociology Department for 
this semester is Professor Hein- 
rich Kellner, a native of Ger- 
many. 

"There is a wide distinction 
between the atmosphere of a 
liberal arts college like Bates 
and a European university," ob- 
served Professor Kellner. "The 
relationship between the teacher 
and the student is more intimate, 




Professor Kellner 



here is a book 
that is 

■ 

teaching us 
how to reach out 
for intelligent 

ideas 




Like most of us, you probably 
feel pressured at times with the 
demands made on you for original 
thinking, — for fresh ideas that 
will lift your work above the 
commonplace. Through the study 
of this book, Science and Health 
with Key to the Scriptures by 
Mary Baker Eddy, we are learn- 
ing how to turn to God for the 
intelligent ideas we need. You 
can do this, too. 

We invite you to come to our 
meetings and to hear how we 
are working out our problems 
through applying the truths of 
Christian Science. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
ORGANIZATION 

BATES COLLEGE 

Lewiston 

Meeting time: 7:30 p.m. Sundays 
Meeting place: 93 College Street 

Science and Health is available at all 
Christian Science Reading Rooms and at many 
college bookstores. Paperback Edition $1.95. 



and thereby provides for both 
the student and the teacher a 
better working basis of com- 
munication." 

"My reasons for coming to the 
States," he said, "were both per- 
sonal and professional. Ameri- 
can sociology is considered a 
progressive field, and most seri 
ous European sociology students 
will try to spend some time in 
the United States to learn about 
the American approach to so- 
ciology. In addition, I have a 
married sister living here whom 
I wanted to see." 

Professor Kellner was born in 
East Germany, and moved to 
West Germany in 1946. He stud- 
ied both mathematics and so- 
ciology at the universities of 
Munich, Gottingen, and Frei- 
burg, until two years ago, when 
he came to the United States. 
Receiving his Master's degree 
from the University of Connect- 
icut, he joined the Graduate Fac- 
ulty of the New School for 
Social Research in New York. 
Last summer, having nearly 
completed requirements for his 
Doctorate, he taught summer 
school at the University of Conn- 
ecticut. 

After this semester, Professor 
Kellner plans to return to New 
York to devote all his time to 
work on his doctor's dissertation. 
"I doubt that I will go back to 
Europe in the near future," he 
stated. "Perhaps never." 

"Besides my interest in Soci- 
ology," added Kellner, "I am 
somewhat of a sports fan — 
even though I don't understand 
much about American popular 
games such as football and base- 
ball. I used to be a track man 
— I ran the two-hundred and 
one-hundred meter dashes, and 
broad- jumped — but my favor- 
ite sport now is skiing. I hope to 
have an opportunity to ski a lot 
up here this winter." 



EMPIRE 



NOW 
PLAYING 

j Maximilian 
Schell 

in 

"The Reluctant 
Saint" 

with Ricardo Montalban 
Akim Tamiroff 

Sun. - Mon. - Tues. | 

KIRK DOUGLAS | 

MITZI GAYNOR ? 

in j 




Winsome Winnie Abducted 



Faculty, Students Prepare 
"Spoof" For Homecoming 



For Love or Money! 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■Ml 

PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 
Continuous Fri. from 5 p. mj 
Sat. from 1 p. m. ■ 
Sun. from 3 p. m. |j 



"NO MAN 
IS AN ISLAND 



Tab Hunter 

"I COULD GO ON 
SINGING" 

Judy Garland 
Dirk Bogard 



By CAROL JOHNSON '64 

,At the hours of 9 p. m. (Friday, 
October 25) and 7:45 p.m. (Sat- 
urday, October 26), the Robin- 
son Players will bring to the 
stage of the Little Theatre alum- 
ni, faculty, and students in a 
presentation of the melodrama, 
"Winsome Winnie." 

When the villanous three: 
Wynchgate, alumnus George 
Orestes; Frogwater, Robert 
Spear '65; and Dogwood, Dr. 
Anthony Abbott intrude upon 
Winnie's boudoir with centipede 
precision, one is amused by the 
idea of the stage as a "School for 
Scandal". 

The plight of the penniless, or- 
phaned, and consequently help- 
less heroine has, of course, a 
happy ending. Scandal's head 

While at Bates, Kellner is 
teaching four courses — Intro- 
ductory Sociology, Population, a 
seminar in Methodology, and 
Marriage and the Family — "As 
a bachelor," he laughed. Then 
serious again, he said, "I feel 
this to be a heavy load, and have 
to put in a lot of work in prep- 
aration for my classes; but I 
think it's a worthwhile enter- 
prise for me, personally. I have 
enjoyed these three weeks at 
Bates so far, and hope I continue 
to enjoy it here." 



Lantern Room 
- Bert's Drive-in - 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 

piatmiimiutm mim minra n mm mwimni 



is cut off with such an outcome, 
but the tongue must still wag 
about the theatrical techniques 
involved in this production. 

As enacted melodrama Win- 
some demands an exaggerated 
form of acting similar to the 
mime in that each elaborate bod- 
ily movement and each stock fa- 
cial expression conveys the 
idea. The effects of the scene 
are made without being con- 
cerned with the validity of the 
sense. You have a few nonsensi- 
cal pecks at the sexes, and side- 
splitting humor. 

The magic tricks and stunts of 
guest performer, Montrose Moses 
which will involve Mr. Norman 
Ross as straight man, will add 
to the prevailing light humor of 
the evening. 

The theatre bill advertises the 
names: D'Alfonso, Crowley, Wait, 
and Dr. Wright, Wayre, Lux, 
and Stred. Profs. Jackman, Sew- 
ard, Sawyer, Muller, and Boyce 
will take part in the grand finale. 
Also in the play are Phyllis Por- 
ton '65, Tod Lloyd '64, Ned 
Brooks '65, Abby Palmer '65, 



BullMarketSeen 
Demanding Rare 
Student Issues 

In 1961, the United States 
Postal Department, founded by 
Ben Franklin and innovator of 
the zip code, made a mistake. It 
printed a new stamp issue up- 
side down inside its frame. Be- 
ing the alert citizen that it is, 
it quickly recalled those that had 
been faultily printed. Some, 
however, were purchased. These 
are of inestimable value to their 
owners as rarities desired by 
collectors. 

The first issue of the Bates 
STUDENT this fall contained an 
editorial advising students to 
save their copies of the paper. 
Those who took this advice are 
in luck. 

If they will check that first 
edition, they will find that in the 
upper left hand corner of page 
one it is marked "Vol. XC." If 
they will check further, they 
will find that numbers two and 
three are marked "Vol. LC." 
This mistake will not occur 
again. 

The conclusion is that those 
who have had the foresight to 
save the STUDENT are possess- 
ors of rare articles of great 
worth, both monetary and sen- 
timental, to themselves or to 
collectors. 

Our advice to those who own 
the aforesaid copies is not to 
sell. Or if you find yourself 
forced to sell, sell dearly for all 
the traffic will bear. And do so 
with our compliments and con- 
gratulations. 



Ritz Theatre 



lllllllg 



^::i:i::i::::i:!::i"::i::;:i"::ii:::i!:::i!!::iii::H:!::i:!::i: 



Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. 
RAY MILLAND 
starring as 

"THE MAN I 
WITH THE 
X-RAY EYES" | 

- plus - 

HORRORS I 
OF THE | 
BLACK I 
MUSEUM"\ 

— Closed Wednesdays — | 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Bates Grad . . . Magician 

Marcia Flynn '65 and master of 
ceremonies, alumnus and trust- 
ee Robert Ireland. The partici- 
pation of such personages en- 
courages one to assert in true 
Back-to-Bates Spirit that "good- 
nature" becomes us all. Tickets 
are $1.00. 



THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



Grad. Study 

(Continued from page one? 

help and advice from one of the 
following faculty members who 
have understaken to act as an 
adviser in a specific applied 
area: 

Medical or Dental Schools, 
Nursing, Technicians: Prof. 
Crowley; Law Schools: Prof. 
Muller; Business Administra- 
tion: Prof. Williams; Divinity 
Schools, Missionary Work: Prof. 
Miller; Chemical Engineering: 
Prof. Lawrance; Engineering 
(except chemical): Prof. Wood- 
cock; Library Science: Miss 
Foster; The Arts, Architecture, 
Design, etc.: Prof. Walsh; Social 
Work: Prof. Cummins; Educa- 
tion, and all MAT Programs: 
Prof. Cummins; Foreign Study 
(other than languages): Prof. 
Jackman; Radio, Television, 
Theatre, etc.: Prof. Quimby. 

Although financial aid for the 
first year of graduate study is 
more difficult to secure than for 
succeeding years, those needing 
help in the form of fellowships, 
scholarships, assistantships or 
loans should consult the cata- 
logues of the graduate schools 
to which they are planning to 
apply for admission. Some states 
make limited but low cost loans, 
and often private organizations 
will make somewhat higher cost 
loans to those with clear objec- 
tives and realistic plans. 

"Fellowships in the Arts and 
Sciences" is available in the ref- 
erence section of the library and 
notices received from graduate 
schools concerning their depart- 
mental grants are filed with 
each undergraduate department. 
Inter-departmental and non-de- 
partmental notices of available 
grants are kept in a special file 
by the Guidance and Placement 
Office in Chase Hall. 



30 

FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



Editorials — 

| Student Activity Fees 

Within the past two weeks, Bill Hiss has emphasized the 
need for a competent Senate with strong leadership. As a 
major example of previous infficiency, he cited the raising of 
the men's student activity fee. The extra fifty cents per man 
is presently incapable of being used because of unclear state- 
ments about its purpose by previous Stu-C leaders. 

Last year, what became an abortive attempt was made by 
the Inter-government committee to determine precisely 
what uses are made of the fees which students contribute to 
various organizations. 

With the members of the Senate already decided, and the 
selection of officers to take place next Monday, the STU- 
DENT urges that a clarification of the status of the student 
activity fees receive priority on the Senate agenda. 

Either ..some use must be found for the money collected, or 
the activity fee should be reduced. The simple accumulation 
of student money, with no prospect of its being used is both 
stupid and inexcusable. 

We are not sure just what is the state of affairs. Indeed, 
very few students seem to know where their money goes. 
This uncertainty makes it imperative that the Senate clarify 
this situation as soon as possible. 



WRJR 

Bates College's radio station, WRJR, operates entirely 
without financial assistance from student activity fees. The 
station's costs are paid, each year, with money contributed 
almost entirely by students. From now, until November 
first, WRJR will be asking students to contribute to this 
year's fund drive. 

Contributions made are not without some prospect of gain 
for the donor. Each day, record albums will be awarded via 
a raffle to one of the donors-to-date, and at the end of the 
drive, a AM-FM radio will be awarded. Also, all the mem- 
bers of that dormitory which purchases the greatest number 
of tickets per dorm member, will enjoy a steak dinner — 
served by the staff of WRJR. 

Most contributors, however, although enjoying the hope 
of winning an album, radio or dinner, cannot expect to gain 
directly from their donations. Indeed, it cannot even be said 
that they will be abje to enjoy listening to WRJR, because, 
for various reasons, very few students can take the oppor- 
tunity to tune-in, when the station is on the air. 

Only in knowing that by contributing you make it possi- 
ble for fellow-students to enjoy the educational experience 
of participating in a unique extra-curricula activity can the 
donor be said to "get something for his money." 

It is for this reason that we ask you to support WRJR. 



Letter To The Editor 

Basis of Morality 

To the Editor: 

The authors of "The Torment- 
ed Generation" (October 12th 
Saturday Evening Post) obvi- 
ously deplore the nation-wide 
campus situation which they so 
strikingly describe, but they 
mention one of its chief causes 
without comment, as though 
speaking of an inevitable natur- 
al phenomen. 

A little reflection should show 
that it is naive to think that an 
effective morality depends on 
"what society will think of 
them", or that premarital sexual 
experience is avoided simply 
because "it is not sanctioned by 
her parents, her church, her 
school or even many of her 
friends". 

Really effective moral disci- 
pline does not depend on what 
society thinks of you, but 
rather, on what you think of 
society, — that is, of people. If 
you are really concerned more 
about the happiness of others 
than of yourself, or even if you 
simply want to feel that "you 
are pulling your own weight in 
this boat", and if you use an in- 
formed intelligence, you will 
avoid hurting people in any 
way — realizing that the hurt 
may be quite subtle, and often 
at second and third remove 
from you. (You will also figure 
out positive ways of helping 
people.) 

Not all the alertness of the po- 
lice nor of unkind neighbors can 
maintain the "social hygiene" 
necessary for the optimum 
health of a society: if "morality" 
means only this social pressure, 
people are going to use their in- 
genuity to circumvent the taboos 
or openly to flout them. 

And they will probably con- 
sider themselves heroes who 
bravely combat prejudice, espe- 
cially since a surprising number 
of well-known writers support 
them. 

But these "champions of eman- 
cipation" have yet to show that 



^EW VOICED 



By JOHN HOLT *64 
By JOHN HOLT '64 



The Creative Vision: Modern 
European Writers on Their 
Art, ed. by Haskell M. 
Block and Herman Salinger; 
Evergreen; 197 pp.; $1.95. 

It is always interesting and 
many times illuminating to listen 
to an artist talk about his art. 
Many times they will say only 
specious things, and sometimes 
they will even make a joke of it, 
like when Tennessee Williams 
was asked on television by a 
somewhat simple interviewer if 
he wrote because he felt an "un- 
avoidable compulsion" to do so. 
Williams looked at him, and said 
with a groan, "Well, I have to 
eat. It gets me money." 

Writers Ask Questions 

But some writers do not have 
to contend with inane questions 
from simple interviewers, they 
sometimes ask their own, and 
then proceed to answer them. In 
The Creative Vision, several, es- 
says by writers who talk about 
themselves, their writings, and 
the state of modern literature, 
have been collected. 

Commenting on these essays of 
modern writers, the editors and 
translators (several of the es- 
says never before translated) 
state, ". . . they have not hesi- 
tated to take on the role of the 
aesthetician, to concern them- 
selves with general problems of 
artistic theory and to propose 
solutions that do far more than 
simply rationalize what they 
themselves were doing in their 
literary endeavors." 

Some of these essays are real- 
ly excellent. Others fail to ex- 

a solid wall can be built of 
crumbling bricks! (The poor 
bricks can't help their condition, 
but people — unless they will- 
ingly make themselves into 
mere things — have a lot to say 
about whether or not they will 
come to pieces.) 

Robert Seward 




Stucfent 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 - News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot '64 Photography Editor 

Will Farrington '66 Ass't Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 , Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
'66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 

Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6661. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



Non -Identity: Escape 
From Responsibility 



cite the reader because of eso- 
teric problems, for instance when 
Thomas Mann gets involved in 
prolofic name-dropping in his 
essay, "The Art of the Novel." 
It was given' as a lecture at 
Princeton for presumably well- 
informed students; for the com- 
mon reader this, and part in the 
anthology like this, will tend to 
be a bit uninteresting. 

On the whole, however, the ed- 
itors have assembled a very 
palatable group of essays by a 
distinguished collection of poets, 
novelists, and playwrights. 

The rest of this review will 
consist of quotes from these es- 
says, without any commentary 
on my part. 

RILKE: If the danger of the 
lover consists in his restricted 
viewpoint, that of the poet is 
his awareness of the abysses 
which divide one order of per- 
ception from others: in fact, 
they are of such vastness and 
suction as to be able to wrest 
the greater part of the world — 
and who knows of how many 
worlds? — ■ past us and away 
from us. 

GIDE: For each of them (his 
novels) it was like a sudden il- 
lumination, the book appearing 
to me all at once, like an un- 
familiar landscape at the sudden 
flash of lightning on a stormy 
night. 

PROUST: Style is in no way a 
decoration as some people be- 
lieve; is it not even a matter of 
technique; it is — as color is 
without painters — a quality of 
vision, the revelation of the 
particular universe which each 
of us sees, and which others do 
not see. The pleasure that an 
artist gives is to make us know 
the universe more. 

PIRANDELLO: For it is not 
the sense of mystery which ter- 
rifies us, since they know that 
mystery is in life; the universal 
way of representing something 
now is what terrifies. 

LORCA: A public that does 
not help and encourage its thea- 
tre, if it is not dead, is moribund; 
just as the theatre which does 
not embrace the social move- 
ment, the historical pulsation, 
the drama of its people and the 
genuine color of its landscape 
and its spirit, with laughter and 
with tears, does not have the 
right to call itself theatre, but a 
place for games or for that hor- 
rible activity called "killing 
time." 



By JOHN BART '64 

It is almost a truism, especial- 
ly apparent in primitive relig- 
ions, that invisible beings, 
whether gods, spirits, djinns, de- 
mons, etc., are more powerful 
than visible ones. This is not 
only because they are free to ef- 
fect their ends, but also because 
their "identity" must forever be 
conjectural as far as man is con- 
cerned. 

A being without identity, or 
rather whose identity is not 
known, is beyond retribution. 
He has attained power by plac- 
ing himself beyond the pale of 
human knowledge. He has also 
generated man's most basic fear, 
that of the unknown. 

One of the most frightening 
scenes in William Golding's 
Lord of the Flies occurs when 
the boys paint their faces. By so 
doing, they throw off the last and 
most basic vestige of their civil- 
ization and become a nameless 
herd which may do any act with 
impunity. 

As portrayed in Euripides' 
Bacchae, Dionysius compels his 
devotees to dress in animal 



skins. In the resultant revelry, 
they become animals, not hu- 
mans, and in their frenzy tear 
and kill all who come near. 
Contemporary Examples 

Simple examples from our own 
experience may be brought forth 
to support these statements. On 
Halloween, why do juveniles do 
things that they would never 
dare at any other time? Is it be- 
cause they are masked, thus un- 
known and thus free? 

As long as criminals are 
masked, they are safe, powerful 
and beyond the law. They have 
no identity. 

In the dark with another per- 
son, though he be one's best 
friend, don't we feel entirely un- 
easy until this fact has been as- 
certained. Until, in other words, 
he has been "tagged". 

As far as our culture is con- 
cerned, changing one's clothes 
may drastically alter a person's 
identity. The change upsets the 
old categories and leaves us 
helpless until new ones are 
formed. The person who has 
changed thus has, temporarily at 
least, some of this same power 



SARTRE: We want the man 
and the artist to win salvation 
together; we want the work of 
art to be an act as well; we want 
to be expressly conceived as a 
weapon in man's struggle against 
evil. 



over us because we do not know 
him. 

And this type is not without 
reason. In our own time, differ- 
ent types of anonymity have re- 
sulted in such things as lynch 
mobs and the murder of six mil- 
lion Jews. 

Perhaps it should be left to 
psychoanalysis to explain this 
phenomenon. I might suggest, 
however, that there seems to be 
a basic flaw, a schizophrenia ar- 
guing a bankruptcy of any real 
value, in any person who finds it 
necessary to change costumes in 
order to break certain taboos. 
Or, on the other hand, in one 
who finds that this loss of iden- 
tity in the eyes of society makes 
him eager and willing to break 
them. 

Could it be that our ethics, like 
our clothes, are something which 
change with the weather. If that 
is so, do we value anything? 



I v 



i 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



3 1 

FIVE 



In Honor Of United Nations Day 



There is only one man in the 
world 

and his name is All Men. 
There is only one woman in the 
world 

and her name is All Women. 
There is only one child in the 
world 

and the child's name is All 
Children. 

Carl Sandburg 



Dancing on Mi. David 
(a celebration of UN day) 

Sciamachy on the mountain 

daring 

glaring 
all October spirits there 

leaping 

weeping 

poems to wear the granite bare 

singing 

bringing 
all strangers to our fountain 

laughter shakes the last leaves 
down 
sighing 
dying 

Autumn making brothers of us 
all 

breathing 

grieving 
what is passing Bound by fall 

lengthening 

strengthening 
shadows creep crossing the 
withering town 

Sciamachy on the mountain 

dancing 

prancing 
the mask that hides the dancer 
hides us all 

singing 

ringing 



We remember our Globe Theater as we carry 
it tossing in a boat 

Somehow 

excited worked up elated by Being or Geography by love 
or dancing 

he excited remembered somehow all sorts of relatives — 

Spanish, Japanese, 
Chinese, Italian; it was a family revelation 

a united nations of poetry 
in a sailing Journal; readers influenced by stars 

and fish commented on 

Influences and family resemblances. 

John Tagliabue 



We, the peoples of United Nations determined to save suc- 
ceeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice 
in our lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind, and 
to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dig- 
nity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights 
of men and women and of nations large and small . . . 

Charter of the United Nations 



Behold this and always love 
it! It is very sacred, and you 
must treat it as such. 

Sioux Indian 



in all the rainbow souls from all 
the isles 
glaring 
daring 

down the evil through the dark 
tree files 
loving 
loving 

all the multicolored Gods that 
heed our call 

R. M. Chute 



Hsieh Values Interlude 
Of Small- College Teaching 



"I think a year spent teaching 
in a small college like Bates will 
give me more education and ex- 
perience than a year spent in 
study," explained Mr. Pei-chih 
Hsieh, visiting professor of His- 
tory. "Here I will improve my 
speaking of English, as well as 
have the close friendly contact 
with Americans which seems to 
be impossible at a large univer- 
sity." 

Since coming to America 
from Taiwan four years ago, 
Hsieh has been doing graduate 
work as a Fulbright scholar at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 
Having finished all work toward 
his Doctor's degree except his 
dissertation on "Chinese Rela- 
tions with France in the 188)' 
he decided to suspend research 
on this subject temporarily to 
teach for a year at Bates. 

"There are so many people at 



the urban University of Penn- 
sylvania," said Hsieh, "that it is 
difficult to make close friends. 
Foreign students from the same 
country are apt to stay in iso- 
lated groups. Here at Bates, my 
colleagues are very friendly — 
they invite me for dinner and 
drop in often to talk. 

"My students seem enthusias- 
tic — and patient with me when 
I have difficulty with the lan- 
guage," he said with a smile. "I 
like Bates very much, and would 
suggest that any foreign student 
coming to America begin at a 
small college where he can get 
individual attention." 

Hsieh received his Bachelor 
of Science Degree in History 
from the National Taiwan Uni- 
versity in 1954, entered the na- 
tionalist army for a year, and 
then became an instructor in 
History at Tunghai University in 




Open Dally 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 



. . . the best authorities are un- 
animous in saying that a war 
with hydrogen bombs is quite 
likely to put an end to the hu- 
man race. . . . There will be uni- 
versal death — sudden only for 
a fortunate minority, but for the 
majority a slow torture of dis- 
ease and disintegration . . . 

Bertrand Russell 



The Cultural Exchange Program 

The shadows of bamboo on the paper. 
Paper, what shadows do you cast on 

the bamboo 
or on the quietness of the reader's face? 
Shadows become words. 
Words become shadows. 

John Tagliabue 



We shall be one person. 

Pueblo Indian 



. . . this is a mighty assignment. 
For it is often easier to fight for 
principles than to live up to 
them. 

Adlai Stevenson 



... I still believe that people are 
really good at heart. 

Anne Frank 



It's the sublime second for Meeting: the U.N. of Poetry 

The minute men are dead and silent 
if we do not see the glory of the Moment, 
for 

United Nations Day 1963 
John Tagliabue 



This is the fire that will help the 
generations to come, if they use 
it in a sacred manner. But if 
they do not use it well, the fire 
will have the power to do them 
great harm. 

Sioux Indian 




Professor Hsieh In His Office 



Taichung, Taiwan. He was one 
of Taiwan's first four Fulbright 
scholars to the United States. 

His wife and two children, 
whom he has not seen for four 
years, and will not see until he 
has completed his requirements 
for his doctorate, remain in Tai- 
wan. 

After receiving his degree, he 
is undecided whether to remain 
here or go to the Far East — 
but since he needs about twelve 
more months of full-time study 
before he can complete his the- 
sis, he has ample time to make a 
decision. 

"My dissertation," he said, 
"involves more work than for 
the ordinary American student. 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 




JEWELERS 
Sll 

50 Lisbon Street Dial 784-524 1 



Not only do I have to have a 
thorough knowledge of my sub- 
ject, but I must write about it in 
an unfamiliar language and 

style." 

This year at Bates, Hsieh is 
teaching three courses: Far 
Eastern Civilizations, Modern 
China, and a European History 
course. He advises the students 
to try to gain an understanding 
of the Chinese, quoting demog- 
raphers who forecast that by the 
year 2000, the Chinese will ac- 
count for more than half the 
human beings who will then be 
alive. 

"There are misunderstandings 
on both sides," he stated, "and 
by studying Chinese history and 
thought now, college students 
may be able to avoid many mis- 
understandings which may arise 
in the future, when they are 
making the decisions for the 
country." 

NOTICE 

The seniors are cordially 
invited to attend the Back- 
to-Bales Coffee and Tea on 
October 26th in the Chase 
Hall Ballroom, immediately 
following the Bates - Maine 
football game. 



Nuclear weapons and atomic 
electric power are symbolic of 
the atomic age: on one side, 
frustration and world destruc- 
tion; on the other, creativity and 
a common ground for peace and 
cooperation. 

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission 



AIR WAVES 

By DOUG WAKEFIELD '64 

In case anyone hasn't guessed, 
the annual WRJR fund drive is 
on again to raise money for the 
station which operates entirely 
on the donations of the student 
body. This year the prizes are 
worth noting. At Sadie Hawkins, 
there will be a drawing for an 
AM/FM radio. The drawing will 
be from the donations certifi- 
cates which sell for fifty cents or 
three for a dollar. 

Last year the girls of Mitchell 
House enjoyed a really great 
steak dinner on WRJR. This year 
the same prize will be given to 
the dorm with the highest per 
capita donation. In addition to 
these two prizes, a drawing will 
be held daily during the Fund 
Drive with the lucky winner re- 
ceiving a record album. Hope- 
fully, this year will top all pre- 
vious years for donations as it 
already tops all previous years 
in prizes. 

Go to Chapel 

The topic of conversation in 
Chapel this Friday, and after- 
wards too, will be WRJR. I 
would advise everyone to come 
to Chapel this Friday, for it may 
prove materially beneficial . . . 
sorry, Juniors. 

Remember, the fund drive 
ends on November 1; so don't 
miss out on the AM/FM radio, 
the records, and the steak din- 
ner which any dorm can win if 
they put out a little effort. 

WRJR would like to take this 
time to thank those of you who 
supported the Key Club Dance. 
Also, thanks go to the Deansmen 
for an outstanding job. 



3^ 

SIX 



— — 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



Hagglund, 
Win Over 

By AL WILLIAMS '64 

The Bates soccer team looked 
impressive trouncing Nasson 6-0 
and Brandeis 6-2 in successive 
home matches. Center forward 
Bob Lanz set a new one-game 
college scoring record by pound- 
ing home five goals in the one- 
sided win over Nasson. Dan 
Hagglund booted home four tal- 
lies and Lanz two in the con- 
test with Brandeis. 

Hustle Good 

The garnet line and fullbacks 
Bob Thompson and Todd Lloyd 
dominated the Nasson game 
completely. Thompson's brilliant 
play and Lloyd's hustle made it 
easy for goalie Art Agnos, who 
had an easy afternoon in the 
nets. Bob Lanz, hustling all the 
time, had a great afternoon in 
front of the Nasson goal, pound- 
ing home five goals from a short 
distance. 

Hagglund opened the scoring 
and Lanz added another in the 
first half and the Bobcats led 2-0. 
Then captain Lloyd Bunten and 
Lanz triggered a third quarter 
explosion. Lloyd, with beautiful 
kicks from the corner, set up 
two scores for Lanz. Lanz, with 
a fine exhibition of hustle, lit- 
erally "ran over" the goalie, 
scoring his fourth tally. Seconds 
later Bob set the record by 
blasting another past the be- 

JERRY'S VARIETY 

203 College Street 

ICE CREAM and CANDY 
Of All Kinds 



Lanz Star In Soccer 
Nasson And Brandeis 



wildered net man. At the be- 
ginning of the fourth quarter, 
Garnet subs flooded the field 
and the scoring ceased for the 
afternoon. 

Defense Shines 

Bob Thompson must be given 
credit for his fine defensive ef- 
forts. The big fullback contin- 
ually came up with the big play 
and got off kicks of more than 
half the length of the field. 
Lloyd and George Beebe, play- 
ing in a semi-injured state, also 
contributed to a fine defensive 
effort. 

Saturday afternoon, before a 
large crowd, the Garnetmen 
turned in another fine perform- 
ance. This time the star was 
Hagglund, who amazed the gal- 
lery with his kicking accuracy. 
Hagglund got his first goal on a 
penalty kick, and the next on a 
beautifully placed direct kick. 
Bob Lanz broke into the scoring 
column to give Bates a seem- 
ingly insurmountable 3-0 lead. 
Brandeis came back, however, 
with a flourish after halftime 
and played their best soccer in 
the third quarter, and closed the 
gap to 3-1 on a penalty kick. 
Hagglund's second penalty kick 
of the day, and Bob Lanz's tenth 
goal of the season placed the 



game out of reach. When Hagg- 
lund banged home his fourth 
goal of the afternoon with four 
minutes left, Coach Sigler began 
mass substitution. The Brandeis 
team was able to boot home one 
more goal before the final whis- 
tle sounded. 

Average of Five 

The soccer team now boasts a 
good 3-1 record and is averaging 
better than five goals a game. 
Next Tuesday the Bowdoin Pol- 
ar Bear will invade the Garnet 
campus in an important State 
series tilt. Friday the Maine 
Black Bear will try to avenge an 
earlier shelacking in another 
home contest. A large and noisy 
crowd might make the difference 
in the final outcome. 



Last Home Game With U. Maine 
Opens State Series Saturday 

A highly-rated University of Speedster Mike Haley will 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, Oct. 23 

Cross country at M.I.T. (B.C.), 
Boston 

Friday, Oct. 25 

* Soccer here with Maine 

Saturday, Oct. 26 
♦Football here with Maine 

(Homecoming) 
Cross Country at U. N. H. 
(B. U.) 
Tuesday, Oct. 29 

* Soccer here with Colby 
•State Series Competition 



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Bob Lanz moves on Nasson (Peabody Photo) 



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Maine eleven invades Garcelon 
Field for the last time Saturday 
in the opening game of the state 
series. 

Homecoming Game 

Saturday's Homecoming con- 
test initiates the 66th State 
Series round-robin, a string 
which will be broken next year 
with the elimination of Maine 
from the Bates and Bowdoin 
schedules. 

The Black Bears are rated a 
favorite to win the final go- 
round on the basis of a 3-2 rec- 
ord, all in tough Yankee Con- 
ference play. 

The Orono club is defending 
state series champion and men- 
tor Hal Westerman has never 
known a losing season. 
'Cats Outweighed 

The Bobcats will be out- 
weighed in the line as the Black 
Bear interior line averages 212. 
Highlighting a tough interior line 
are three All-Maine picks last 
year, tackle Ernie Smith, and 
guards Phil Soule and Roger 
Boucher. 

Smith, a 6-3, 232 pounder, is a 
junior who is tough to move. 
Soule, an All-Yankee Conference 
selection at center last year is a 
228 pounder who has good 
speed. 

Boucher, a former Edward Lit- 
tle gridster, is also an excellent 
extra-point and field goal hoot- 
er. Boucher, 5-10, 186 lbs., is 8 
points off an all-time Maine rec- 
ord. His toe has added 14 points 
after Black Bear tds this year. 

Two underclassmen man the 
end posts for the Westerman 
team. Junior Ed Sherry will man 
the left flank and sophomore 
Dave Harnum will anchor the 
other end of the line. Harnum 
is a rangy 6-4 end with good 
speed. 

Soph at QB 

Westerman always seems to 
come up with a good signal- 
caller and this year is no excep- 
tion. A sophomore, Dick DeVar- 
ney, moved out qb Ray Austin 
who last year engineered the 
Bears to a 20-0 shutout over the 
'Cats. Austin is a good punter 
with a 35.5 average. 

DeVarney led last year's Baby 
Bears to a 2-1-1 record. Accord- 
ing to Westerman the sophomore 
does everything well, but excels 
in ball-handling, a must in Wes- 
terman's straight-T system. 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



.: Louis P. Nolin :. 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
side Auburn, Half Mile from 
Turnpike Exit No. 12 . . Phone 
783-1488 . . . Room Phone 

STARDUST MOTEL 

Exclusive But Not Expensive 



open at one halfback slot with 
Dave Brown at the other. Haley 
led all Maine scorers in '62, hit- 
ting pay dirt four times. Brown 
is a favorite target of DeVar- 
ney's in passing situations. 

Junior fullback Bill Perkins 
provides the power in the Wes- 
terman backfield. 

Straight-T 

The Bears run out of a straight - 
T formation with major empha- 
sis on power plays up the mid- 
dle. The Blue and White like to 
stick to the ground in a grind- 
it-out type of play, but when 
forced to the air can score. 
Strong Points: A quick, mobile 

good-sized line, a good 

coach. 

Weaknesses: Little depth at 
guard and center. 

Bates State Series 
Ticket Information 

Homecoming Game — October 26 

— Bates vs. University of 
Maine. 

Ticket Sale — At the Bates 
Athletic Office beginning on 
the Monday prior to the game 
and ending at noon on Friday. 
Day of game sale: 9:30-12:00 
in the Alumni Gymnasium lob- 
by — 12:30 p. m. at the Garce- 
lon Field ticket booths. 
Admission — (1) Bates Students: 
Enter Garcelon Field through 
the student gate on Bardwell 
Street, and sit in the student 
section: Sections 1 and 2 of 
the grandstand and Section R 
adjacent to the grandstand. 
Identification cards must be 

shown at the gate and to the 
ushers in the stands. 

(2) Student Guests: Students 
who wish to have guests sit 
with them, may purchase tic- 
kets at the Athletic Office at 
$2.50 each. Students and their 
guests may sit anywhere in 
the Student Section: Sections 
1-2 and R. 

(3) Season Pass Holders: Show 
pass at any gate, and to the 
ushers in Section 5 and part of 
Section 4 in the grandstand. 
Seats are on a "first come first 
served basis" in this area. 

All Others: Adults, $2.50; un- 
der 12 years, .50. 

Important 

(1) Ticket reservations may be 
made by telephone, but must 
be picked up by noon on the 
Friday before the game. Tic- 
kets cannot be reserved by 
telephone after this time. 

(2) Refunds cannot be made on 
tickets after noon on the Fri- 
day before the game. 

(3) For additional information 
telephone Bates Athletic Of- 
fice, Lewiston 782-6221. 

First-Manufacturers 
National Bank 

of Lewiston and Auburn 

CONVENIENTLY 
LOCATED 

f or Bates Students at 
456 SABATTUS ST. 

Member F. D. I. C. 



\ 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



•2>3 

SEVEN 



Dalers Finish Second In 
Meet With Maine, Vt 



By AL HARVIE '65 

In a triangular cross-country 
meet Saturday with the Univer- 
sity of Maine, University of Ver- 
mont, and Bates, Maine finished 
first with 25 points, Bates was 
second with 32 points, and Ver- 
mont finished third with 82 
points. 

McKusick Sleals Show 

But it was Bates' own Karl 
McKusick who stole the show. 
Starting and finishing on Univer- 
sity of Maine's Alumni Field be- 
fore a crowd of 9,300 people 
gathered for Maine's homecom- 
ing football game, Karl raised 
many an eyebrow as he finished 
some 200 yards ahead of the 
state universities' best. It was 
the same Maine team that scored 
a perfect 15-50 score over Bates 
last year. In beating the Univer- 
sity of Vermont it was the first 
time Bates has beaten a state 
university in cross-country. 

In the winner's circle for the 
third consecutive week, Karl 
remains undefeated in collegiate 
competition. In the words of his 
coach, Walt Slovenski, "Karl is 
not only the best cross-country 
prospect I've seen at Bates, he 
is currently one of the finest 
runners in New England." 
Speaking of his team as a whole, 
he added, "This is the best 
cross-country team I've had and 
is definitely the highest spirited 
team. They never seem to get 
enough running. They even 
worked out Sunday, the day af- 
ter a meet." 

Fine Showing 

Finishing in second place was 
Jerry Ellis of the U. of M. who 
formerly held the Bates course 
record which McKusick broke 
here last week. In third place 
was Howard Shaeffer, also of 
the U. of M. In fourth spot fin- 
ishing second for Bates was 
Capt. Eric Silverberg. Rounding 
out the scoring for the Univer- 
sity of Maine were: Fred Jud- 
kins 5th, Ben Heinrich 6th, and 
Horace Horton 9th. For Bates in 
the scoring column were: Finn 
Wilhelmsen 7th, Ken Trufant 
8th, and Basil Richardson 12th. 

The University of Maine team 
was "shocked" by the superla- 
tive performance of the Garnet 
harriers. And Maine will con- 
tinue to be "shocked" as long as 
Bates continues to atttract the 
likes of McKusick, Silverberg, 
Wilhelmsen, Trufant, and Rich- 
ardson. 

Double Chore 

This week the Slovenskimen 
face a double chore as today 
they are at M.I.T. to meet th 
Engineers along with Boston 
College in a triangular meet, 
"iturday will find the 'Cats at 
Durham, N. H, to meet the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire and 
Boston University. 

Maine 



Ellis 


2 


Shaeffer 


3 


Judkins 


5 


Heinrich 


6 


Horton 


9 




25 



WARD'S TV Inc. 
COLOR and BLACK and WHITE 



Bates 




McKusick 


1 


Silverberg 


4 


Wilhelmsen 


7 


Trufant 


8 


Richardson 


12 




32 


Vermont 




Stowell 


14 


Pitaniello 


15 


Mulhorn 


16 


Ashton 


18 


Moreau 


19 




82 



Cheerleader 




Bobcat Of The Week 





Complete Line of 
Transistor Radios and Stereos 



288 Lisbon St., Lew. 



782-3711 



(Talbot Photo) 

Betty Bogdanski is one of the 
new alert faces that you have 
noticed on the cheering squad. 
A sophomore from Meriden, 
Connecticut, Betty is known both 
in her Cheney House Dorm and 
around campus as being a very 
energetic and ambitious girl. 

Besides giving of her time 
to the cheerleaders at practices 
and games, Betty has also man- 
aged to do impressively well in 
her academic career. In a re- 
cent chapel program she won an 
award for having achieved the 
highest academic average in 
Spanish for her freshman year. 
Currently, Betty is wavering 
between an English and a math 
major with leanings toward 
math. 

Betty's past experience as a 
cheerleader has been very bene- 
ficial to this year's squad. She 
can always be counted on to 
come through with a new idea 
or motion just when it is most 
needed. 



(Talbot Photo) 

Selected from a host of out- 
standing performers this week 
is football Capt. Paul Planchon 
for our weekly prize. 

Repeat Choice 

The sociology major from 
Pomfret, Connecticut, is a se- 
nior and previous winner of the 
Bobcat award. Paul is a three- 
year letterman and last ytar 
was a repeat choice for the All- 
Maine team. 

Hampered somewhat by a foot 
injury previous to last Saturday, 
Paul had been limited to play 
below his expected potential. 
But last Saturday at Middlebury 
Paul personally ignited the 
spark in his team's effort and led 
the way to victory. 

In key spots, Paul moved for 
valuable yardage consistently on 
the ground and through the air. 
His punting was good and his 
defense at the halfback slot 
was termed as superb. 

Paul, who on the ground 
netted approximately a hundred 
yards rushing, teamed up with 
standout fullback Tom Carr to 
net the vast majority of Bobcat 
yards for the day. 

It is for this vital effort and 
spark of determination, plus all 
the other characteristics possess- 
ed by a formidable competitor, 
that we single out Paul to re- 
ceive our offering of congratu- 
lations. 



2Cing a Kamtt 



By DON KING '64 

I guess we must call a spade 
a spade. The Off-Campus "Play- 
bunnies" certainly proved to be 
all brawn and no brains. They 
are willing to fight for every- 
thing but the game. In fact, the 
"Playburinies" are so tough that 
they refused to be satisfied 
fighting only with the opposi- 
tion — between arguments they 
fight amongst themselves. All in 
all, the "Bunnies" are really a 
tough mob. 

Roger Lowers the Boom 

Last Wednesday found a sur- 
prising and scrappy Roger Bill 
team invading highly - touted 
Playboy territory. After a shaky 
first period the Playboys barely 
squeezed into paydirt with a 
one yard pay-off pitch from 
"Y. A." (what a misnomer) 
Wallach to yours truly. It was 
to be a dismal day for the "Bun- 
nies", however, as Roger Bill 
picked up the pieces with Sam 
Aloisi in the cockpit. Sam took 
to the overland route as he 
spotted Rick Sailor lurking in 
the Playboy end zone. No one 
was within shouting distance of 
Rick as he had little trouble find- 
ing the handle to notch the 
count. 

This really upset the Play- 
bunnies — so much, in fact, that 



they almost started swinging at 
each other. To add to the "Bun- 
nies' " frustration, the final 
votes proved to be tallied as the 
game ended in 6-6 deadlock. 
How to Win Friends 

The following Monday found 
the Playboys convinced that 
they were upset and were de- 
termined to get back on the 
winning track. West Parker had 
different ideas, however, and 
gave the "boys" a sound trounc- 
ing 18-6. The game was not to be 
void of excitement, though, and 
the highlights came in the sec- 
ond half as "Bad Bobby's Boys" 
were ready to take on all com- 
ers. 

If the "tuffies" put as much 
effort into scoring points as they 
did into running over people 
it might have been a contest. In 
any event, Paul Sadlier and 
company never looked sharper 
as they made determination pay 
off in points. Three times Sad- 
lier sucked in the blitzers and 
rifled prodigious pay-off passes 
to paydirt to run the West 
Parker total to 18. 

Only the Fates Know for Sure 

The question now is not 
whether the "Playthings" will go 
undefeated, but rather will they 
win a single contest. 

(Continued on page eight) 



fashion in two easy steps! 



1. Pendleton Traveller Jacket 

$17.95 

2. Pendleton Easy Skirt 

$12.95 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

Nearest the College 

$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
ROOM LOUNGE 
Tel. 784-5491 



SMITTY'S 
Barber Shop 

274 Sabattus St. Lewiston 
Tel. 782-9010 
Specializing in 
FLAT TOPS 
ALWAYS TWO BARBERS 

Open - Mon.-Sai., 8-5 

Closed Wednesday 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 
Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 




Country Clothes 
by Pendleton 

ALWAYS VIRGIN WOOL 




Pick Pendletons, 
pair them — 
and, lo ! you've a suit. Or 
separates that team with a 
host of other clothes you 
already have. These are the 
casuals — the classics — that 
you live in and love for their 
versatility. The Traveller 
Jacket in a choice of Village 
Plaids is unlined in sizes 10-20. 
The matching Easy Skirt is 
just that. Sizes 8-20. 



LISBON STREET 



Lady Benoit 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



3V 

EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 23, 1963 



Bobcats Rally To Beat Panthers, 14-9 

Planchon Sparks Second Half; 
Carr Scores Both Touchdowns 

By KEITH BOWDEN '64 

The Garnet eleven, behind the hard-running of Tom Carr and Paul Planchon and the 
passing combination of Bill MacNiven and Planchon, staged a second-half rally which cul- 
minated in a 14-9 victory over Middlebury at a sun-drenched Porter Field. 

The victory proved costly for the Hatch men as John Yuskis, John Schatz and Grant 
Farquhar suffered injuries in the hard-hitting battle staged in unseasonably warm 80 de- 
gree temperatures. 




With NICK BASBANES 

The game-ending gun at Middlebury last Saturday brought 
to a close, whether you were aware of it or not, the first 
phase of the Garnet gridiron schedule, as well as the 
Bobcat 14-9 win. For this Saturday's Maine game opens the 
second half of the season: the State Series. Up here a Maine 
team can lose all its previous games, but if it wins in the 
series, the campaign is considered a success. Such is the 
fervor, excitement and avid rivalry shared between the four 
teams. Ever since its conception seventy years ago, 
the state series has provided unlimited thrills and spirit. But 
the years have gone by when the opening of the 
series saw the fielding of four potentially evenly matched 
teams. Over the many years the University of Maine has 
grown from a small state sponsored agricultural school to a 
large and athletically mighty university. The depth possi- 
bilities of Maine places it in a category far above that of 
its three little cousins. And it was presumably on the basis 
of this criterion that Bowdoin and Bates decided last year 
to drop Maine from their schedules, thereby ending the age 
old rivalry. 

Even though we have voiced our support for the move, we 
still feel a little bit of melancholy in knowing that Maine will 
play its final football game ever on Garcelon Field this Sat- 
urday. The Series was a great boon to spirit; but practica- 
bility and rationality must take precedence over sentimental- 
ity. I'm sure that new traditins, along with the predicted 
progress of a new century here at Bates, will emerge to re- 
place the archaic ones. 

As for the stage itself, on this the eve of the final act, it is 
set with the note that all four of the constituent squads are 
in possession of formidable records. Before the sun had set 
last Saturday, all of the member football squads were sport- 
ing the wreaths of a savoring victory. Colby upset a previ- 
ously unbeaten Trinity team to the tune of 24-7. The Mules, 
with a record of two and three, travel to Brunswick where 
they clash with the potent Polar Bears. Bowdoin will take 
the field fresh from a 20-0 whitewash over Williams. Their 
record is three and one; the single loss being 3-0 at the hands 
(rather the foot) of mighty Amherst. And there is of course 
Maine; they smashed UConn by the score of 35-12. In ^ankee 
Conference play the Black Bears were a respectable three 
and two. Last year they won only one game in the Yankee 
Conference; but they swept the State Series. 

If one is to make comparative scores, however, brief men- 
tion should be made of the 1961 season. Maine won the Yan- 
kee Conference title, and the only blemish on their otherwise 
perfect record was a tie here at Bates, 15-15. So really, any- 
thing can conceivably happen. 

And yes, this week I will make two predictions. Bates will 
please the homecoming crowd with a victory. And to you die- 
hard Giant fans, the Browns will take up where they left off 
two weeks ago, and they will convince everyone that they 
are best. 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. at Bates St. 
Tel. 783-2011 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

Phones in Rooms 
- Free TV - 

Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 
Auburn, Maine 
Dial 783-2044 



Slow Start 

The 'Cats started out very 
sluggishly. They took the open- 
ing kickoff and were forced 
back to their own four yard line. 
A Planchon punt was blocked. 
John Yuskis picked up the loose 
ball only to be tackled for a 
two-point safety. 

Later in the first quarter, Mid- 
dlebury scored on a 63 yard 
drive highlighted by a 32 yard 
pass from quarterback Mike 
Maclntyre to end Gil Stanley. 
Middlebury climaxed its drive as 
Mclntyre hit Stanley again for 
a nine yard strike. The extra 
point was good and the Bobcats 
were on the short end of a 9-0 
score. For the remainder of the 
half, Bates was able to contain 
the Panther offense, but was un- 
able to mount a sustained attack 
of its own. Fumbles and inter- 
ceptions on the part of the Bob- 
cats seemed to dull the offense, 
and it never really hit its stride 
in the first half. 

Planchon Sets Stage 

The second half told the story 
of an aroused Bobcat team. The 
'Cats immediately took charge, 
and sparked by Captain Paul 
Planchon, the sputtering Garnet 
offense came alive. Getting the 
ball on their own 48, the 'Cats 
scored in five plays. Planchon 
ripped off runs of 33, 7 and 6 
yards to put the ball on the 
Middlebury six yard line. Work- 
horse Tom Carr pushed it over 
in two carries. Wayne Pang- 
burn's kick failed and the Bob- 
cats still trailed 9-6. 

The 'Cats had to wait until 
the last period before they 
pulled ahead. Again Paul Plan- 
chon, running like the Planch of 
old, ignited the spark again 
with runs of 10 and five yards. 
Then quarterback Bill MacNev- 
in hit him with an 18 and then 
a 12 yard pass to put the ball on 
the Middlebury fifteen. Tom 
Carr then powered through the 
Panther line three successive 
times, scoring from three yards 
out on his last plunge. MacNevin 
hit Planchon in the end-zone for 
a two-point conversion and it 
was 14-9 in favor of Bates. The 
Garnet defense held off all at- 
tempts by Middlebury to cash in 
again and earned their second 
straight victory, and evened 
their season's record at 2-2. 



One of the game's key factors 
seemed to be the 80 degree heat. 
The Garnet squad appeared to 
be in better condition and in 
possession of the superior bench. 

To single out heros is always 
a difficult task, but special 
praise should be given to Cap- 
tain Paul Planchon who really 
provided the impetus in the 
'Cats' backfield when he took 
over the halfback chores from 
the injured John Yuskis. Tom 
Carr once again gained over 100 
yards rushing, despite the Mid- 
dlebury defenses being keyed 



on him. And John Williams was 
a standout in his unheralded 
blocking role as he opened up 
the holes for the running of 
Planchon and Carr. 

Line Lauded 

In the line, Jim Callahan, 
Steve Ritter and Willy Farring- 
ton played key roles, while frosh 
Mike Traverso and Gerry Ire- 
land showed they are improving 
with every game. If the Bobcats 
aren't too injury-plagued they 
appear ready to give Maine a 
rugged afternoon this Saturday 
at Garcelon Field. 



- - HAY RIDE PARTIES - - 

DANCING, TOO 



OLD SAND FARM 

DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 




Planchon moves around end (Talbot Photo) 



BOBCAT PREVAILS IN FELINE CLASH 

Bates Middlebury 



First Downs 

Yards Rushing 

Passes 

Passes Completed 

Passes Intercepted 

Yards Passing 

Total Net Yards Gained ... 

Punts (Average) 

Fumbles 

Own Fumbles Recovered 



16 


10 


219 


126 


11 


15 


5 


8 


0 


2 


77 


93 


296 


219 


3-25 


5-31 


4 


2 


1 


1 


6-60 


4-40 



NAULT'S 
Hospital Square 

ESSO SERVICENTER 
Dial 782-9170 
305 Main St. Lewision, Me. 

Lubrication - Washing 
Tire Repair - Anii-Freeze 



KING'S KORNER 

(Continued from page seven) 
J.B. has proven themselves as 
the team to beat as they remain 
undefeated after two impressive 
victories. The first feather in 
their cap was a 38-12 romp over 
East Parker, featuring Donny 
Beaudry taking all the honors. 
Don was all over the field as he 
gathered in three T.D. tosses and 
still threw for a fourth. The sec- 
ond J.B. victory was an 8-2 
score over a strong Roger Bill 
squad. 

The only other A league ac- 
tion during the past week was a 
12-12 standoff between East and 
West Parker. In B league Roger 
Bill fell victim to Smith North 
20-18 while Smith Middle 
dumped Smith South 24-12. 

I Man of the Week 

There was little deliberation in 
the selection of this week's In- 
tramural Man of the Week hon- 
ors. Don Beaudry is the unani- 



mous choice as a result of his 
outstanding performance against 
East Parker. 
Standings: 

A League 

Won Lost Tied 

JB 2 0 0 

WP 10 1 

OC 0 11 

RB 0,11 
EP 0 11 



SM 

SN 

JB 

RW 

OC 

SS 

JB 

SS 

WP 

SM 

SN 

EP 



B League 



0 
0 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
0 
0 

C League 

2 0 
1 
1 
1 
0 
0 

Horses to watch continued 
next week. Last week: 4 out of 6. 



0 
0 
1 
1 

2 



« > 



4 y 



it 



< » 



4 ■» 



i 



Hates 




Stu dtnt 



Vol. XC, No. 6 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



By Subscription 



Students Select 
Ahem, Ziegler 
To Head Senate 

One week after the election of 
the members of the Student 
Senate, Bates students went to 
the polls last Monday to select 
a president and vice-president 
for the Senate. Robert Ahem 
'64 and Margret Ziegler '64 are 
the president and vice-president 
of the student governing body. 

A total of two hundred seven- 
ty students, thirty per-cent of 
the electorate, voted in this 
election. One hundred eight wo- 
men and one hundred sixty-two 
men cast ballots. 

Ahern was the overwhelming 
choice, receiving three times as 
many votes as his nearest com- 
petitor. Miss Ziegler received six 
votes more than any of the 
other women on the ballot. 



Citations Dinner 
Honors Couples 
For Services 

Bates' thirteenth annual Dis- 
tinguished Service Citations Din- 
ner was held here last Friday. 
Five couples: Mr. and Mrs. Da- 
vid J. McKinnell, '48, '48; Dr. 
and Mrs. Robert E. Dunn, '50, 
'51; Dr. and Mrs. Hamilton P. 
Dorman, '40, '40; Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur B. Bradbury, '49; Mr. 
and Mrs. William D. Ginn re- 
ceived citations from President 
Charles F. Phillips. 

Mr. Frank Stred, secretary to 
the president, presented the 
couples to President Phillips 
who gave them their citations. 
"These Distinguished Service 
Awards have been given for a 
number of years to those, Bates 
graduates or not, who have been 
of service to this institution," 
said President Phillips. 

The citations are presented for 
exceptional services to Bates. 

Members of this year's Dis- 
tinguished Service Awards Com- 
mittee are: Charles Clason, 
Chairman, '41; Frank Stred, Sec- 
retary, '53; Lewis Davis, '36; 
Dean M. L. Lindholm, '35. Com- 
mittee members will always in- 
clude a trustee or trustees and 
staff members. 



Bates Awards Five 
Degrees; Dedicates 
Four New Buildings 

Bates dedicated four buildings 
and conferred five honorary de- 
grees in a ceremony last Satur- 
day in the Chapel. 

Receiving the honorary de- 
grees were: Alfred C. Fuller, 
founder of the Fuller Brush 
Company, Doctor of Laws; Fred 
M. Hechinger, New York Times 
Education Editor, Doctor of 
Laws; Eugene F. O'Neill, Direc- 
tor of the Telstar Project, Doc- 
tor of Science; William S. Paley, 
Doctor of Laws; Barbara W. 
Tuchman, Pulitzer Prize winning 
author of The Guns of August. 

President Charles F. Phillips 
gave a short talk to introduce the 
dedication service. "It is not the 
buildings themselves that make 
this a happy day; rather it is the 
| increased educational opportuni- 
ties these buildings give us." 

The groups and their repre- 
sentatives in the service were: 
Public, John H. Reed, Governor 
of the State of Maine; Parents, 
Ira D. Wallach; Faculty, Doctor 
Walter A. Lawrance, Professor 
of Chemistry; Students, Robert 
P. Ahern, '64, President of the 
Men's Council; Alumni, Frank 
M. Coffin; Trustees, Willis A. 
Trafton, Jr., Chairman of the 
Board of Overseers. The congre- 
gation took part in the dedica- 
tory responses. 

See picture on Page 2. 



Rob Players Feature 
'Bitter Rice' Friday 

"Bitter Rice" is an Italian film 
dealing with the tribulations of 
rice workers in the Po Valley of 
northern Italy. It was directed in 
1949 by Giuseppi De Santis, 
and stars the very sexy Silvana 
Mangano. It is an earthy tale of 
sex and violence with a good 
deal of footage devoted to Miss 
Mangano's lovely labors in the 
rice paddies. The movie is a 
product of the neo - realistic 
school, yet is not a good exam- 
ple of it because of its tendency 
towards melodrama. It is worth 
seeing, however, for its natural- 
istic settings. Performances are 
at 7 and 9 Friday night in the 
Little Theater. 



Religion Panel 
Opens Friday 

The Centennial Academic Dis- 
cipline Conference in Religion 
and Philosophy will be held this 
Friday in the Women's Union. 
Featured guests will be Rever- 
end Luther P. Durgin, Professor 
Eugene S. Ashton, and Professor 
Peter Bertocci. 

Reverend Durgin is pastor of 
the Pittsford Congregational 
Church in Pittsford, Vermont. 
Professor Ashton is chairman of 
the Religion Department of 
Tufts University. Peter Bertocci 
is a professor of Philosophy at 
Boston University. 

The 6onference will conform 
with the format observed in the 
previous meetings. Reverend 
Durgin will address the Friday 
morning chapel assembly. All 
three guests will meet with fac- 
ulty members of the Religion 
and Philosophy Departments for 
a luncheon in the Costello room. 
That afternoon at three the 
guests will be available to in- 
terested students in the Women's 
Union. At that time they will 
answer questions regarding ca- 
reer opportunities, challenges 
and problems. 

Dean Healy has stressed the 
fact that Friday morning's chap- 
el assembly will, not be religi- 
ously oriented although the Rev- 
erend Durgin is speaking. He 
will concern his address with 
career and study aspects open to 
the student of religion. 




Honorary degree recipients Paley. Tuchman, O'Neill, Hech- 
inger and Fuller pose with President Phillips. 

Panel Stresses Meaning 
Instead Of Evaluation 

A defining of the terms "Conservatism" and "Liberalism" 
supplemented the announced intention of evaluating these 
outlooks for the college student, in last Friday's Panel Dis- 
cussion in the Little Theater. 

Dr. James V. Miller, moderator* ' 
for the panel, initiated the dis- 
cussion by asking panel mem- 
bers to point out what they con- 
sidered the essential features of 
conservatism and liberalism 
Within the allotted hour, the 
eight panelists followed this 
lead, but found little time to 
evaluate these essential features 

Change Is For Others 

Fred M. Hechinger, Education 
Editor of the New York Times, 
pointed our* that "most people 
favor change when it affects 
others, but not when it affects 
them." Regarding others, people 
tend to be liberal. For them- 
selves, people are conservative. 

"What might have been con 
sidered radical in the past," Al 
fred C. Fuller, founder of the 
Fuller Brush Company, stated, 
"may not be considered radical 
now." Conservative people are 
for something when it has been 
shown to work. 

Norman Gillespie, Editor of the 
STUDENT, suggested that secur- 
ity is basic to the conservative 
viewpoint which Mr. Hechinger 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Oct. 30 
Vespers, 9:30-10 
Math Help Classes, Libbey No. 
1, 7 to 9 
Thursday, Oct. 31 
UN Poetry Reading, Mt. David, 
4-5 

Tutorial Meeting, Libbey No. 
8, 4 to 5 

Friday, Nov. 1 

"Bitter Rice" in Little Thea- 
ter, showings at 7 and 9 

Football Rally at 7 in Gym 

Centennial Panel in Women's 
Union at 3 p. m. 
Saturday, Nov. 2 

Football, Cross Country, and 
Soccer at Bowdoin 

Sadie Hawkins Dance, Gym at 
8 p. m. 

Sunday, Nov. 3 
President's Open House for 
Frosh from 3 to 5 



pointed out, but asked if there 
isn't something behind this se- 
curity. "Conservatism is venera- 
tion for the past," Gillespie said. 
"But it is a past which has ac- 
complished something." When 
something works, when someone 
has accomplished anything, he 
not only accepts but perpetuates 
this thing. 

"Liberalism is a point of view, 
an approach, a willingness to 
consider a wide range of ways 
for solving a problem," said Eu- 
gene O'Neill, Director of the 
Telstar Project. "I don't see 
how any student can be a con- 
servative." 

"Why is it," asked Mrs. Barba- 
ra Tuchman, Pulitzer prize au- 
thoress of The Guns of August, 
"that students today are turn- 
ing to Conservatism? Is it fear 
of the future, is it because the 
prospects are so fearful, that 
students are unwilling to be 
liberal?" 

"Last weekend I visited God- 
dard College, a very liberal 
school, at which the students de- 
cide everything," Robert Ahern, 
President of the Stu-C stated. At 
this institution, which is ad- 
mittedly experimental, new ideas 
and willingness to experiment 
predominate. 

"Usually a person becomes 
more conservative as he gets 
older," Hechinger said. "I am 
afraid to think what is to happen 
to a person who is conservative 
as a student." 

"The basic difference," Gillespie 
said, "is not whether students 
are going to consider problems, 
but how they are to consider 
them. A conservative thinks that 
answers are to be found in the 
examination of what has hap- 
pened. A liberal, while accepting 
the importance of what has been 
accomplished, does not want to 
institutionalize what is, but con- 
tinues to search for new ap- 
proaches and answers." 



Paley Requires 
Standards, Aid 
For Education 

"The first business of any 
free self-governing nation is 
that of educating its people," 
stated William S. Paley, 
Chairman of the Board, Col- 
umbia Broadcasting System, 
last Saturday morning at the 
Dedicatory Convocation. 

The United States, Mr. Paley 
continued, is now facing a na- 
tional plight in education, a 
plight which is being ignored by 
citizens and overshadowed by 
other more materialistic issues 
of the country. As educational 
standards for employment rise, 
naturally the necessity for a 
well educated populace must 
parallel this movement. 

Lack of Standards 

"The United States has no ed- 
ucational laws or actual educa- 
tional standards," emphasized 
Mr. Paley. The lack of unity in 
compulsory education laws and 
the actual education to be pro- 
vided is one of the nation's most 
outstanding moral issues. 

The solution to this problem is 
two-fold, he stated. We must find 
a way to see that basic minimum 
standards for education are es- 
tablished throughout the nation 
and assure federal intervention 
in states where these standards 
are not met, by diverting federal 
assistance from other areas of 
state economy into education. 

States Retain Rights 

Paley favors states retaining 
their rights regarding the qual- 
ity of education, yet he stressed 
that the national government 
must set up quantitative stand- ' 
ards to assure at least basic edu- 
cation for all citizens. "This is 
not a liberal or conservative is- 
sue; it cuts across political lines. 
The principles of education and 
democracy are interdependent." 

Federal aid to education need 
not mean federal control of edu- 
cation. Are not many state in- 
stitutions now being subsidized 
by the government without re- 
strictions to course content? 

Courage Necessary 

"We must face the problems of 
education with courage and di- 
rectness. We seem to be able to 
set up basic minimal standards 
for every aspect of life except- 
ing that of our most vital re- 
source — education. Human re- 
sources are now being taken for 
granted; we must now take into 
consideration a universal com- 
munity of educated men and wo- 
men." 



PRE-LAW STUDENTS 
Pre-Law students are ad- 
vised that representatives 
from the University of Chi- 
cago and Boston University 
will be on campus next 
week. Professor K. W. Dam 
of U. of Chicago will visit 
the college on Monday; and 
Dean Kendall of Boston U. 
on Wednesday. Interested 
law students should see Pro- 
fessor Muller for interview 
appointments. 



3*> 

TWO 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



Forensic Forecasts 

By SUE STANLEY '64 
In American-style debating the same resolution is argued 
throughout the entire season. This means that as the year 
progresses a deepening analysis of the topic becomes neces- 
sary. By the end of the year a debater has a knowledge of 
the specialized field, comparable* 



to that gained from a course in 
the subject. 

The topic this year is one 
which the reader as well as the 
debaters may well be interested 
in . . . "Resolved: that the fed- 
eral government shall guarantee 
an opportunity for higher edu- 
cation to qualified high school 
graduates." 

In any debate, the affirmative 
side has four major require- 
ments incumbent upon them. 
They must define the terms of 
the resolution, i.e., what is high- 
er education? Should it include 
vocational and technical schools 
as well as colleges and universi- 
ties? And should it include those 
state universities which must ac- 
cept everyone who applies to 
them? 

Problem of Definition 

Also in the definition comes 
the problem of determining what 
is a "Qualified high school grad- 
uate"? Shall the scope of the de- 
bate only include those high 
school students who qualify be- 
cause of their highly superior 
academic records? Or those ac- 
cepted by any accredited insti- 
tution of higher learning? Or 
shall it include any student who 
is accepted at any school of high- 
er learning in this country? 

Once the affirmative has decid- 
ed which stand they will take as 
to the meaning of the definition 
they must then show a need for 
this resolution. Among the poss- 
ibilities of reasons why this new 
system is needed one considera- 
tion looms high above the 
others: financial. 

Financial Change Necessary 

It would appear at this time 
that the major reason for a 
change used by most affirmatives 
will be the financial necessity of 
such a change. There are sur- 
veys showing the many superior 
students who are unable to go 
on to college just because of lack 
of money. This stand, however, 
is not as easy as it would appear 
at first glance; the affirmative 
must also show that the present 
scholarship and loan programs 
are inadequate and that no mat- 
ter the amount of pains these 
hopeful students took the money 
simply was not available. This 
may prove to be somewhat dif 
ficult since there are figures 
showing that there are many 
scholarships and loans which 
are not used from year to year 

Inadequate Guidance 

Another position taken by the 
affirmative may be that pres- 
ently most high schools have in- 
adequate guidance counselling 
facilities and that this contrib- 
utes to a loss of potential col- 
legians. It can be shown that 
many qualified students do not 
further their education because 
of a lack of motivation. 

The affirmative may contend 
that this is detrimental to the 
national as a whole and that 
with proper high school guid- 
ance this could be rectified and 
is, in fact, called for by the very 
words of the proposition; since 
it states that the federal gov- 
ernment shall guarantee it in- 
cludes the inherent assumption 
that the government will do its 
best to see that advantage is 
taken of this opportunity. 



Need for Information 

A third point of interest in 
this area is a need for accurate 
and concise information for high 
school students. Affirmatives 
may contend that it falls within 
the province of guaranteeing an 
opportunity if the government 
provides accurate information on 
scholarships and loans which 
are available at the present time. 
Under the system now in opera- 
tion books on this subject are 
published by private companies 
in a haphazard fashion. 

The second affirmative speaker 
must present the plan whereby 
these deficiencies will be correct- 
ed. Here, too, are a number pf 
interesting alternatives. 

One possibility is to provide 
federal scholarships or grants 
much like the British system, 
whereby nearly the total student 
cost of a collegiate education is 
footed by the government. Sec- 
ondly a system of federal loaijis 
based on an extension of the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act of 
1958 might be advocated. A third 
plan, one which has received 
much comment in the news of 
recent years, is a system of in- 
come deduction or tax credits 
for parents who have sons or 
daughters attending college. 

Negative Defends Present 
System 

All of these possibilities are 
very interesting when examined 
further and allow the negative a 
fertile field for contentions. For 
in each debate it falls to the 
negative team to show that the 
present system is adequate, and 
even if there were some difficul- 
ties they could well be handled 
by mere modifications of the 
present system. 

The negative might also con- 
tend that the affirmative has not 
shown any deficiencies at all 
but has merely exaggerated the 
condition or has looked at it 
from one viewpoint only and an 
inaccurate one at that. 

Point Out Problems 

An issue that may well be 
brought up by the negative is 
that if this many more stu- 
dents will now be entering col- 
lege where will they be put? 
They might point out that class- 
rooms are already overcrowded 
and there is a teacher shortage 
with those we already have. Also 
regarding the plan the negative 
must show that it is impractical, 
inherently disadvantagous, or 
would fail to " correct the defi- 
cencies shown. 

This is merely a quick sum- 
mary of what appear to be the 
major issues of the topic at the 
present time. The education bills 
presently in Congress are being 
followed with a great deal of in- 
terest and their outcomes will 
undoubtedly have an effect on 
the issues of debate on this top- 
ic. Since this is indeed a topic 
which affects collegiate debaters 
directly, the arguments may well 
be even more spirited than usual 
and the plans more ingenious. 



Sadies Pursue Beaux 
For Backwards Ball 

Men, get out your track shoes; women, get out your ropes, 
bear traps and handcuffs — Sadie Hawkins Day is this Satur- 
day in the Alumni Gym. 

Always a "colorful" event,* a « numbers game> . will d 
Sadie Hawkins 1963 will cer- ^ event) ^ qut c fiates 
tainly be no exception. As usual girlg camng for dateS) and iden _ 

tifying themselves only by an 
arithmetic system yet to be 
cracked by the college's stronger 
sex (?). 

The traditional guessing game 
will go on in the men's dorms 
until the Sadies — repleat with 
combat boots and straw hats — 
call for their prizes. Once at the 
dance, couples will have an op- 
portunity to "git hitched" by 
Marryin' Sam himself. The even- 
ing will be rounded out by 
square dancing and genuine Dog- 
patch refreshments. 

An added attraction this year 
will be the announcement of the 
winner of the AM/FM wireless 
being offered by WRJR in con- 
nection with its fund drive. 

So get a move on, men, or 
you're apt to be dragged off to a 
hillbilly frolic this Saturday — 
Sadie Hawkins Day. 



WCBB 

Tonight 

8:00 Lyrics and Legends — Ed 

McCurdy and Bonnie Dob- 
son sing broadside ballads. 
8:30 President Kennedy at Am- 
herst — Address by the 
President to the Amherst 
College Convocation and 
his participation in the 
Robert Frost Memorial Li- 
brary Groundbreaking Cer- 
emonies. 

Tomorrow Night 

7:30 Focus on Behavior — De- 
veloping new concepts on 
man's ability to learn. Cur- 
rent research on experi- 
mental psychology. 

Friday Night 

8:30 Detroit Symphony Orches- 
tra — Thomas Schippers 
conducts the orchestra in 
Britten's "Variations on a 
Theme of Frank Bridge, 
Opus 10" and Sibelius' 
"Sand Symphony No. 2 in 
D Major, Opus 43". 



RALLY 

There will be a Junior 
class rally Friday evening at 
8:00 p. m. Pre-rally activities 
begin at 7:30. Location of 
rally to be announced. 




Guidance 

INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Lt. Susan H. Sherwood and an- 
other personnel officer from Bos- 
ton will be on campus Wednes- 
day, November 6, to interview 
men and women interested in 
the United States Marine Corps 
for officer training programs. 

Also on the same date, Lt. S. 
E. Wiklinski will interview men 
interested in the United States 
Navy Officer Training Program. 
Representatives will be in Chase 
Hall, lower level. 

SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

United Aircraft Corporation 
has several opportunities for 
prospective June 1964 graduates. 
Openings are as follows: Engin- 
eering Aides and Assistants (fe- 
males only) with B. S. in 
Chemistry, Physics, Mathemat- 
ics and/or L. A. majors who 
have a solid background in 
math; Librarians (male and fe- 
male) with B. S. / M. S. in Phys- 
ics or Chemistry and a read- 
ing knowledge of at least 
one foreign language; Pro- 
grammers (male and female) 
with B. S. / M. S. in Mathemat- 
ics, Physical Sciences or any 
L. A. major with a strong minor 
in math. 

A company brochure may be 
seen in the Placement Office, and 
the person to contact is Mr. Er- 
nest R. Ciriack, Supervisor, Pro- 
fessional Recruitment, Research 
Laboratories, United Aircraft 
Corporation, East Hartford 8, 
Conn. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

Northwestern University School 
of Business has sent the Guid- 
ance and Placement Office in- 
formation regarding a Masters 
Degree in Business Administra- 
tion. This is typical of many 
many such announcements. 



Convocation Participants Dedicate Buildings 



TUTORIAL PROJECT 
All those interested in the 
tutorial project, regardless of 
whether they attended the 
last meeting, should go to the 
project meeting tomorrow, 
Thursday, at 4:00. The meet- 
ing will be held in 8 Libbey 
Forum, and is required for 
all tutors who have sub- 
mitted a schedule. 



JERRY'S VARIETY 

203 College Street 

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Of All Kinds 




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Be Physically Fit — 
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PERSONALLY SUPERVISED PROGRAMS 
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FOR STUDENTS 

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If we fail to get these 
results in 60 days — 
Lose 15 lbs. excess 
body- weight, lose B 1 ^" 
off hips and waist, lose 
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1 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



THREE 



SOUTH OF PARIS 



By PETER REICH '65 

Grenoble, 22 Oct. 1963 — 
In my travels before coming 
to stay at Grenoble, I sampled 
restaurants from Paris to Can- 
nes, and would like to record 
here a few impressions. 

Most restaurants open (for the 
evening meal) about 7:00 p.m. 
In almost every town and city, 
one can spend hours walking in 
the backstreets, comparing pric- 
es, for each restaurant has the 
daily menu posted outside. We 
found that spending between 5 
and 8 NF, (4.90 NF = $1.00) one 
can have a good four course 
meal which, with half a bottle 
of wine, comes to about 12-16 
NF for two, or about three dol- 
lars for hors-d'oeuvres, main 
dish, vegetables, and dessert. 

Dessert for an alarming ma- 
jority seems to be yogurt, or 
yaourt, affectionately called "ya- 
hoo" by those foreigners who 
have trouble with their r's. Ya- 
hoo is offered at every lunch and 
dinner in the University restau- 
rants. 

The University restaurants are 
cheap, and not bad. For 1.00 NF, 
or roughly 20F, one can buy a 
breakfast consisting of a bowl of 
coffee or hot chocolate, a roll, 
three pats of butter, and a small 
serving of marmalade. 

Lunch and dinner are more ex- 
pensive, and run about 25 cents 
each. There are five University 
restaurants in Grenoble which 
are run either on a set-up such 
as in Rand and Commons, or an 
arrangement by tables: when a 
table has six people, the dishes 
are brought to the table. 

The restaurant in which I us 
ually eat is run like Commons 
There is a choice of salad, then 
the "yahoo", or, if you prefer, 
grapes, or cheeses. After the 
cheese shelf, a plate is thrown at 
you which usually supports 



AT PEKING" 

i_ 




Charlton Heston 
David Niven 



Ava Gardner j 



— Color, Technirama — 



something resembling meat but 
which rarely has the same con- 
sistency, let alone taste, of meat 
such as we know it. Shortly af- 
ter receiving the meat, a plate 
of vegetables is slid [sic?] in 
your general direction. After all 
this, you give the meal ticket to 
the nice man, grab a "yahoo" 
spoon, and head for the bread. 

Bread, it seems, is part of the 
national character. There are 
stereotypes of little boys carry- 
ing breads bigger than them- 
selves home to mama. It is quite 
true. Long bread is the rage and 
it is great, cheap, and fun. In 
the University restaurant, there 
are three big baskets for bread, 
and students passing by throw 
handfuls of it on their trays. 
Much of the bread is not eaten. 
That which is not eaten is 1) 
used as a napkin, since nothing 
is provided, or 2) collected after 
the meal. 

It is almost exciting after the 
doors have closed, to watch the 
fat little lady come out with an 
enormous paper bag and a little 
box. Into the paper bag goes all 
uneaten bread, and into the box 
goes the nibbled bread. I have 
a hunch the whole pieces are 
served at breakfast. 

There is a free supplement 
given at the two main meals, 
which is usually a mass of vege- 
tables cooked until beyond rec- 
ognition. This supplement is not 
always bad, and often needed to 
fill up. 

If one wishes, carafes of wine, 
and beer can be purchased in a 
small cafe adjoining the restau- 
rant. The only liquid given is 
water. 

One last note regarding the 
University restaurants. If a girl 
enters with anything on her 
head, scarf, hat, or whatnot, al- 
most every male in the restau- 
rant screams "CHAPEAU" and 
throws bread at the poor gir) 
who must suffer, for if she takes 
off the "chapeau", the jeers 
would worsen. 

Of all my eating experiences 
so far in France, however, noth- 
ing has approached the peaceful 
meal we had among the fishing 
boats in Cannes, sitting in the 
fading browngolden sun cutting 
open and eating cool oysters, 
while children fished from the 
dock and the old men gathered 
and played their jeu de boules. 



.'minimi 



inmuinnr. 



PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 

Continuous Fri. from 5 p.m. 

Sat. from 1 p. m. 
Sun. from 3 p.m, 

"TO 
KILL 
A 

MOCKINGBIRD" 

- with - 
Gregory Pack 



6 Black Horses" 

Joan O'Brien 
Audey Murphy 



Ritz Theatre 

Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. 
DOUBLE HORROR SHOW 

"DEMENTIA" 



= ** 



THE TERROR 

Sun. - Mon. - Tues. 

= 

■ 

"Manchurian 

Candidate" | 

Frank Sinatra and 

Janet Leigh | 

'DUEL OF THE TITANS" j 

{ — Closed Wednesdays — j 



Garnet Will Accept 
Significant Article 

By ANN NOBLE '65 

"This is not an English major's 
journal!" she said emphatically, 
pointing to a small booklet. "It 
is the campus literary publica- 
tion. There's a difference." 

Marilyn Fuller '64, editor of 
this year's Garnet, went on to 
explain: "Many students think 
that contributions to the Garnet 
must be 'literary'. On the con- 
trary, what we on the staff ask 
about a piece of writing is not 
Ts it literary?' but, 'Is it good 
literature?' 

"This means that subjects are 
bound only by the requirement 
that they be significant, either in 
themselves, or through the au- 
thor's art. 

The four board members rep- 
resent both science and the 
arts, and sophomore through se- 
nior classes. Besides Marilyn, 
who is a senior English major, 
the staff includes: Priscilla Clark 
'66, English major; Ann Noble 
'65, undecided Chemistry-Eng- 
lish major; Derek Hurst '65, Eco- 
nomics major; and Richard 
Hoyt '64, Biology major. 

"For literature," Marilyn con- 
tinued, "we welcome poetry, 
serious or satirical, creative or 
critical. Reviews of a book, play 
or movie, a familiar essay, a 
descriptive sketch, a short story, 
a play, a ballad or a sonnet, hai- 
ku or an ode — anything you 
want to write and others would 
want to read, we'd like to see 
submitted. 

"You can submit contributions 
to any of us on the board or 
send them postage-free to my 
mailbox, #115. Don't forget to 
have your name on them," she 
warned laughingly. 

"By the way," she added, "be- 
fore any contribution goes be- 
fore the board, all personal iden- 
tification will have been re- 
moved. The work remains 
anonymous until after the board 
has reached a decision regarding 
it. 

"We've been talking so far 
about contributions of literature, 
but the Garnet also publishes art 
work. Besides the cover design 
the Garnet includes illustrative 
or independent sketches and 
prints. But see any board mem- 
ber for more information. 

"Do remember," she added in 
closing, "we can only publish 
what you submit. We want a 
good Garnet; do you?" 



Facts Add Perspective 
To Parker Hall Fire 




West Is West And East Is East . . . 



i 



Lantern Room 
Bert's Drive-in - 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 



WARD'S TV Inc. 
COLOR and BLACK and WHITE 



Complele Line of 
Transistor Radios and Stereos 



By ANNE GAMLEY '66 

This past summer West Parker 
appeared to have been con- 
demned to the blazing fires of 
Hell. On July third a fire, start- 
ing in the top floor storage room, 
raged throughout the upper floor. 
According to President Phillips, 
the fire was brought under con- 
trol due to the teamwork of the 
Lewiston - Auburn fire depart- 
ments, together with those of the 
surrounding communities. 

The firemen worked under ad- 
verse conditions. The sprinkler 
system in the dorm had been 
disconnected, thus allowing the 
fire to spread before it was dis- 
covered. Also hampered by a 
faulty hydrant, the fire fighters 
had to use Prexy's Puddle as a 
source of water. In spite of these 
factors, the fire was confined to 
the one area. 

The damage to the dorm was 
extensive. The entire top floor 
was destroyed and much of the 
lower dorm was damaged by 
smoke and water. According to 
student sources, a great deal of 
personal property was also lost. 

The aftermath of the fire 
brought an onslaught of rumors. 
Contrary to popular student be- 
lief, the upper floors of West 
Parker met all the standards of 
the Fire Inspection previous to 
the fire. No part of the dorm had 
been condemned in any way. 
Some speculators thought the 
fire was caused by faulty wiring. 
However, as Mr. Ross has point- 
ed out. the electricity as well as 
the water system in Parker and 
Hathorn Halls had been discon- 
nected to facilitate the construc- 
tion of the new Administration 



CHESS PLAYERS 
A chess team and club is 
forming on campus. Anyone 
interested in becoming a 
member should leave their 
name in Box 197 or contact 
M. Flashman before Novem- 
ber 12 so that arrangements 
can be made for an appro- 
priate time and meeting 
place. 



288 Lisbon St., Lew. 



782-3711 



THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



T 



building. Because both the fire 
department and the insurance 
company had been notified of 
this fact, the college was cov- 
ered. 

The rebuilding and repairs in 
the dorm have been paid for by 
insurance. Unfortunately, the 
personal property destroyed in 
the blaze cannot be replaced by 
the College; it does not have in- 
surance covering private prop- 
erty in any dorm or building on 
campus. This fact has always 
been emphasized by the Admin- 
istration when students make 
plans to store articles in cam- 
pus buildings. 

Could the fire have been pre- 
vented? The storage rooms might 
have had better ventilation; yet 
this would have meant recon- 
struction of the entire building. 
Possibly a more careful check of 
materials stored might have pre- 
vented the spontaneous fire. 
However, even this is mere 
speculation. It is difficult to say 
that the fire could have been 
avoided or that the college was 
at fault in any way. 

Renovation Started 

As a result of the fire, the 
men m upper West Parker have 
excellent new rooms — perhaps 
the best on campus. These 
rooms were built according to 
the architect's plans for the fu- 
ture renovation of Parker Hall. 
Other repairs such as repapering 
and rewiring were also neces- 
sary. In addition, the dorm has 
new fire doors in the stair wells 
and emergency signs over the 
exits. These comply with the 
Maine fire laws. The laws, af- 
fecting only new construction, 
had not applied to Parker pre- 
vious to the fire. 

The final effect of the fire will 
probably be felt sometime in 
June. It is expected that the ad- 
ministration will either form 
new policies concerning storage 
or strictly enforce those already 
listed in the Blue Book. Mr. 
Johnson, Director of Mainte- 
nance, would like to see a more 
careful check of stored materials. 
Mr. Ross, bursar, feels that the 
existing rules are adequate if the 
students will adhere to them. 
Whether the college learned 
from the mishap remains to be 
seen. 



On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
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Turnpike Exit No. 12 . . Phone 
783-1488 . . . Room Phone 

STARDUST MOTEL 

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I 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



Editorials 



i 



Footnote To A Panel 



Conservatives do not deny the existence of undiscovered 
truths, but they make a critical assumption, which is that 
those truths that have already been apprehended are more 
important to cultivate than those undisclosed ones . . . 
Conservatism is the tacit acknowledgement that all that is 
finally important in human experience is behind us; that 
the crucial explorations have been undertaken, and that it 
is given to man to know what are the great truths that 
emerged from them. Whatever is to come cannot outweigh 
the importance to man of what has gone before. 

William F. Buckley 
• Up From Liberalism pp. 153-54 

History, Cultural Heritage, Philosophy, and even Science 
demand that a student study and understand "the crucial 
explorations that have been undertaken." In any discipline, 
past efforts must be appreciated. 

In college, a student spends many hours reading about, or 
listening to lectures on, the accumulated knowledge in vari- 
ous fields. Studying necessarily involves certain facts which 
are fundamental to the subject. 

But are these facts or "crucial explorations" to be venerat- 
ed? Is "a knowledge of the great truths" sufficient for an 
educated person? 

Up From Liberalism was published in 1959. Consider, how- 
ever, the validity of Buckley's idea for Physics before Ein- 
stein. According to Buckley, "What is to come cannot out- 
weigh the importance to man of what has gone before." Yet, 
Newtonian Physics has been supplemented. 

Following the above quotation, Buckley writes, "Certain 
problems have been disposed of. Certain questions are closed: 
and with reference to that fact the conservative orders his 
life." 

What, then, does the "conservative physicist" (sic) do when 
the "closed questions" of space and motion can no longer be 
adequately explained within the Newtonian synthesis? 

New ideas are vital to the maintenance of collegiate life. 
A conservative education would become rote recitation of 
"closed questions" and "great truths." 

The liberal education affirms the importance of what has 
been accomplished, but proceeds on that basis to continue to 
explore new ideas. For the liberal there cannot be a "closed 
question." To develop himself, and his society, and each in- 
dividual's opportunity to do likewise, the liberal student will 
experiment and entertain various possibilities. 

Yet, change for change's sake cannot be a student's credo. 
The student must realize that the present system may be 
right. Truth may have been discovered. But the truth can 
never be realized by denying to consider other possibilities. 
To "close a question" makes verification impossible. 

Conservatism and Liberalism represent outlooks, approach- 
es — ways of thinking. Dr. Eugene O'Neill said, "I do not 
see how a studenl can be conservative." 

Neither do we. 



Art And Entertainment 

The possibilities of the cinema as an art form have scarce- 
ly begun to be realized. Within the past few years, beginning 
with La Dolce Vita, a "new wave" has swept, through movie 
making circles. Currently, movies directed by Fellini, De- 
Sica, Renais, and Visconti are not only artistic achievements, 
but also financial successes on Broadway. 

Throughout this school year the Rob Players have sched- 
uled movies which represent the combination of art and en- 
tertainment currently in vogue. These movies, while not 
current, illustrate cinematic developments since World War 
II and embody many techniques now in practice. 

The Rob Players' films afford an excellent opportunity to 
develop a critical standard and to appreciate the artistic de- 
velopments within movies. Students would do well to at- 
tend. 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Steve Talbot *64 Photography Editor 

Will Farrington '66 Ass't Photography Editor 

Robert Lanz *65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 * Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 



Letter To The Editor 

Boola, Boola 

To the Editor: 

Much has been said since I 
have been a sudent at Bates of 
the apathetic student body. In 
a major phase of our extra-cur- 
ricular activities, the field of 
athletics looms proudly before 
us in victory or in defeat. 

There always has been an in- 
tense rivalry between our two 
schools, and many times the cold, 
stone Polar Bear has met the 
brush of a party of Bobcats. 
Two years ago this very deed 
was done. I am not by any 
means advocating such measures, 
but I believe our rivalry may be 
rechanneled into more construc- 
tive, immediate means. 

Webster defines a rally as 1) 
to recover unity and strength by 
a reassembling of scattered 
forces and 2) to join in active 
support. If we are an apathetic 
mass than I have nothing more 
to say, if not I suggest we ful- 
fill both of Webster's definitions. 

The Junior class rally this Fri- 
day evening presents such a 
means to unite enthusiastically 
in being proud of our well de- 
serving Bobcat eleven and get- 
ting our two pounds into the act 
in support of them and in wish- 
ing them the best of luck in a 
victorious game. 

Bowdoin is our football rival. 
Keep this in mind at the rally. 
We, of the Junior class, in pre- 
senting this rally, hope we do 
see everyone there. 

Karl Wolf '65 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
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Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



MEW VOICES 

By JOHN HOLT '64 

"So the Muse was near as I 
found a fire-new style to set in 
the Dorian cast the speech of 
acclamation." 

— Pindar, third Olympian ode 

The artist lives in two worlds; 
the world that he creates and 
the world in which he exists. 
The former is the stuff of his 
reality; the latter is his abode 
of habitation. Out of the amor- 
phous, insensate matter of ex- 
istence, out of the ambiguous 
being of men in time and space, 
the artist creates form and sub- 
stance and his ultimate reality. 

Out of the brute cacophony of 
undirected sounds he invents 
his symphony. He senses in his 
soul the latent harmony amidst 
the discord. 

The artist translates the hi- 
eroglyphics of the universe into 
his own song. The hand that in- 
scribed the hieroghyphics re- 
mains apart from the creation; 
but the artist becomes his crea- 
tion. He lives it. When a man is 
living in his created reality, be 
it a cockroach, a bloody sock, a 
moon reflection on a midnight 
pond, a field of flowers — he is 
imbibing the ether of life — his 
life. And it is sacred. 

What, then, happens when the 
bricks of his worldly dwelling 
begin to crumble, and the wind 
whistles through the crevices, 
nipping the edges of his sacred 
creation? His first desire is to 
exist in his reality. Then he be- 
comes impulsively angry after 
such repeated annoyances and 
unthinkingly wills their destruc- 
tion. But if he is strong — like the 
man from Nazareth — he will go 
his own way — forgiving the 
ways of men in the world who 
remain in their pedestrian liv- 
lihood, secretly bestowing his 
benign pity, and rejoicing in his 
truth. 



WRJR And Bates: 
Shall It Succeed? 



By RICHARD R. DOW '64 

Once upon a time, there was 
an AM radio station by the name 
of WVBC, the Voice of Bates 
College. WVBC had facilities, 
staff, money, — almost every- 
thing it needed except a sense 
of responsibility, in which it 
was shamefully lacking. So one 
day, WVBC went too far. The 
results were immediate and defi- 
nite: the station was closed 
down and its AM license 
revoked. 

Several years later, long after 
WVBC was merely an unpleas- 
ant remembrance, another group 
of students decided to pick up 
the pieces and begin a "radio 
club" that would serve the Lew- 
iston-Auburn area and the Bates 
College community on the FM 
band. 

Another Chance 

Several members of the fac- 
ulty and administration were in- 
strumental in this effort. With 
their assistance, new studios 
were constructed and new plans 
made. The student body was en- 
thusiastic; the administration, 
although hardly enthusiastic, 
was willing to give the idea of 
Bates College broadcasting an- 
other chance. 

On October 6th, 1958, WRJR- 
FM commenced broadcasting. At 
first, all looked bright for the 
future; but this infant organi- 
zation soon discovered that ma- 
turity is not gained without 
growing pains. Almost immedi- 
ately a new problem presented 
itself: Very few students could 
hear them because few owned 
or had access to FM receivers. 
Something had to be done. Allan 
Wulff, the Station Manager, had 
worked in communications while 
in the armed services, and had 
earned a First-Class F.C.C. li- 
cense. 

It was he who did nearly all 
of the wiring and technical work 
in preparing WRJR to broadcast. 
Thus, finding necessity to be, as 
ever, the mother of invention, he 
began to design a converter sys- 
tem that would allow the WRJR- 
FM signal to be heard on the 
AM band on the College campus. 
Several converters were built 
and installed, but none of them 
worked to produce satisfactory 
quality. The converter experi- 
ment was destined to prove a 
thorn in the WRJR side for the 
next five years. 

Growth was slow and irregu- 
lar. Countless improvements in 
the radio station, most of them 
nearly insignificant when taken 
separately, combined to streng- 
en its effectiveness. Perhaps it 
would be a new bulletin board 
for the office; a new record con- 
tract, the cost of which could 
barely be met; or a new micro- 
phone for Studio B. WRJR grad- 



ually struggled to its feet. It now 
had a staff of forty-five people 
and was prepared to count itself 
among the major campus organi- 
zations. 

But the story of WRJR is not 
the story of a silver lining behind 
every cloud. Early in the 1962- 

63 broadcasting year, the Busi- 
ness Director of the radio station 
reported a huge deficit that had 
recently been uncovered. The 
station was literally hundreds of 
dollars in debt at a time when 
the annual budget for operation 
was only between five and six 
hundred dollars! Yet in May of 

1963, less than a year after the 
deficit was discovered, the debt 
was paid. The planning and sac- 
rifice that made it possible can 
only be imagined by those who 
did not live through it; those 
who did will never forget it. 

WRJR is presently facing prob- 
lems of equal or greater com- 
plexity than it has in the past. 
The converter problem must be 
solved as soon as possible. Last 
year, two campus organizations 
alloted funds to the station to 
help solve this problem. Using a 
part of these funds, WRJR made 
significant progress in re-de- 
signing and testing a new con- 
verter system. 

Threshold Of Success 

After five years, WRJR is on 
the threshold of success, but 
the threshold will not be crossed 
for weeks to come. As students, 
even with expert advice from 
knowledgeable sources, the 
WRJR technical staff has a lim- 
ited amount of time available 
for this problem. 

A second major problem fac- 
ing the radio station is that of 
funds to operate. WRJR is not 
on the Student Activities Fee, 
and receives no support from 
Bates College except for its 
heating, electricity, and water 
bill. Hence, every year WRJR 
must solicit money from the stu- 
dents. This requires both time 
and effort in excessive quanti- 
ties. 

Support From Students 

For five years it has been the 
students of Bates College who 
have paid for, worked for, and 
operated WRJR, the Bates Col- 
lege radio station. Significant, 
isn't it, that they would do this 
for a radio station that most of 
them can't even hear? Everyone 
agrees that Bates should have a 
| radio station, but only the stu- 
dents are willing to support it! 

Friday, the first of November, 
will be the final day of the 1963- 

64 Fund Drive. These funds must 
last WRJR until November, 

1964. For WRJR, its staff of for- 
ty-five students, and for the 
Bates College community as a 
whole, may the Fund Drive be 
a success! 



Autumn Poem 

By TAM NEVILLE '66 
What is the secret? Do you know? 
Catch a leaf. No. Catch a leaf, let it go. In the slow 
emptying of the leaf into the wind, in the vacant sound 
and free the leaf said to the path — make way, make 
way. . . . 

And the path hurried away and in the joy of knowing 
forgot the leaf for a boy who, whistling as he went 
bent and examined scientifically all the veins and 
orange strains. He did not even ask but gave it back 
to air. 

He hardly even looked goodbye. He jumped and the 
leaf was high and whistled there. 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 




"Bitter Rice' Result Of 
Italian Neo- Realism 



Sound film is potentially the 
art of the future. It is ... a 
synthesis of each and every ele- 
ment — the oral, the visual, the 
philosophical; it is our opportun- 
ity to translate the world in all 
its lines and shadows into a new 
art form that has succeeded and 
will supercede all the older arts 
for it is the supreme medium 
in which we express today and 
tomorrow. 

— V. I. Pudovkin, 
Film Technique 

"Bitter Rice," an the theater 
screen Friday, is a neo-realistic 
Italian import of 1949. It was 
produced by Lux films and was 
directed by Giuseppi De Santis. 
The film, termed "an earthy yarn 
of sex and slaughter", concerns 
the tribulations of rice workers 
in the Po Valley and features the 
sultry Silvana Mangano. 

Luscious Females 

There is a paradox in these 
films of the late forties and ear- 
ly fifties. The more grim and 
sordid the neo-realistic land- 
scape became, the more it was 
populated with luscious and un- 
earthy females. With poverty, 
class-struggle, disease, violence, 
crime, and sadism came such 
sublime creatures as Silvana 
Mangano, Sophia Loren, and 
Gina Lollobrigida. Anna Mang- 
nani, whose art would have been 
well suited to these films, was 
forced to seek the realism of 

FALL ART EXHIBIT 

The Bates Art Association 
will display paintings, draw- 
ings, and sculpture at its 
Fall Exhibit, to be held 
Thanksgiving weekend — 
November 28-31 — from 1 - 5 
p.m. each day in the Art 
Room. 

Anyone wishing to exhibit 
should register in the Art 
Room, Hathorn Hall, be- 
tween 4 and 5 p.m. on No- 
25, 26, or 27. 




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Tennessee Williams' "Rose Tat- 
too" in this country. 

The films of this era represent 
the Italian film maker's all-out 
bid for American box office ap- 
proval. "Open City" and "Bicy- 
cle Thief" had gained consider- 
able praise from abroad adding 
impetus to the development of 
the art in Italy^ Unfortunately, 
the prospect of the great Amer- 
ican market began to subvert 
the neo-realistic, art of Italian 
cinema. 

Such tasteless degenerates as 
"On Any Street" and "Three 
Forbidden Stories" began filter- 
ing into American theaters. 
These films lacked the art for 
the art theater circuits and 
didn't have the popularity for 
the neighborhood chains. The 
legacy, including "Bitter Rice", 
was a collection of sordid melo- 
dramas in naturalistic settings. 
Art vs. Entertainment 

Although "Bitter Rice" doesn't 
represent what Pudovkin re- 
ferred to as the supreme medi- 
um, I hope there is a good turn- 
out this Friday. We must bear in 
mind the fact that there is a 
difference between film-art and 
film-entertainment, whether or 
not they are successful. The 
Robinson Players have assem- 
bled eleven very fine films and 
this collection offers an excel- 
lent opportunity to develop a 
critical standard. 



Former Faculty Head Reflects On Bates, 
Education, And Return To Teaching 



DOES A LEAF . . . 

By TAM NEVILLE '66 
Does a leaf learn how to fall 
As a child riding a bicycle learns 
To hold the handles ready 
And to keep the wheels upright 
Along the line of his body, 
As he learns to lean to the 
corners 

(and to stay away from sand.) 
Does a leaf take a lesson 
Before it falls to land? 

Or is it just 

That the earth 

Always knew 

How to draw 

The crisp flowers 

Wandering softly down the air. 



Louis P. Nolin 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sis. 

Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



By HERBERT MOSHER '65 

(The following is an interview 
with Dr. Raybom Zerby. Dr. 
Zerby is once again teaching 
Cultural Heritage at Bates. He 
was at one time chairman of that 
department, following which he 
served as Dean of the Faculty. 
After attempting retirement for 
little more than a year, he has 
returned to the classroom to en- 
able the "Cultch" department to 
carry its schedule. Editor.) 
Reporter. The admissions office 
tells us that the present fresh- 
man class is more capable of 
handling college courses than 
any previous class. Now that 
you have returned to the 
classroom, do you notice any 
change in the intellectual 
capabilities of your students? 
Zerby. It's actually a little early 
to judge as to the caliber of 
the students. 
R. Do you think the rise in Col- 
lege Board scores can be cor- 
related to a rise in thinking 
ability generally, or do you 
feel that the increase is due 
to certain individuals? 
Z. It think it's more likely to be 
individual. I am of the opin- 
ion that the average student 
is more mature today. He 
has better high school train- 
ing than he had a few years 
ago. He is more able to make 
judgments and to get some- 
thing out of reading. 
R. Do you think that class dis- 
cussions show this, or has the 
class dialogue slacked off? 
Z. No, I don't think it has 
slacked off at all. But so far 
my experience with the pres- 
ent cultch class has been so 
short that I don't have the 
material to draw a definite 
conclusion. 
R. In faculty meetings have you 
noticed any comment made 
about the size of certain large 
classes? 

Z. Well, you see I have the very 
great advantage of not hav- 
ing to go to faculty meetings. 
All I do is teach. 

R. Do you use a lecture or a 
discussion technique in your 
Cultural Heritage class? 

Z. I'm making a conscious effort 



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Dr. Raybom Zerby 



EVEN A SLIDE RULE . . . 




to move towards the discus- 
sion area. I think more time 
should be spent in class dis- 
cussion which directly treats 
the text. 

R. What degree of control should 
a professor exercise over his 
class? 

Z. The student should be given 
a chance to bring forward 
questions or points of inter- 
est that this particular stu- 
dent would like discussed. 
Then the teacher must judge 
whether this point is of in- 
terest to a majority of the 
class, to determine whether 
it is worth a period of discus- 
sion. In case such questions 
for discussion are not brought 
forward, the teacher must 
stand ready to introduce some 
himself. 

R. Have you developed an atti- 
tude towards the classroom or 
a philosophy of teaching? 
. Oh, it's very easy to give an 
ideal. But you're on the spot 
if you don't succeed in living 
up to that ideal day after day. 
I think that teaching ought to 
deal not with the trivia of the 
material, but should be pri- 
marily concerned with the 
great ideas. In literature, it's 
perfectly legitimate to deal 
with the techniques — the 
way which an author secures 
his effects. But in the reading 
of most material such as that 
with which Cultural Heritage 
deals, it is the ideas which are 
important. Every member of 
the class should be helped, 
urged, or led towards decid- 
ing whether these ideas are 
right or wrong, and how 
they can be used. The acad- 
emic tendency of staying for- 
ever on the fence ought to be 
overcome. The academic 
weakness is to weigh the ar- 
guments on, both sides — to 
balance them very carefully- 
then for fear of being wrong, 
to avoid coming to a conclu- 
sion. You never can live this 
way. You have to make de- 
cisions knowing that you may 



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be wrong. You still keep your 
mind open for new insights 
and understanding. But in the 

meantime you don't just sit 
there scratching your head. 
You act in the light of the 
best information you have. 
Sometimes college work in- 
capacitates a person to make 

R. Would you advocate more 
seminar classes? 

Z. Yes, I'm in favor of more 
classes which meet together 
for a lecture period and 
then separate in small sec- 
tions for discussion. 

R. If you were to design a new 
academic program for Bates, 
what changes would you 
make? 

Z. I would like to see the school 
go on a twelve or thirteen 
week term instead of a semes- 
ter. This would eliminate 
that awkward period after 
Christmas before finals. We 
would then run on three 
twelve or thirteen week terms 
per year. Adopting this 
change, we would be ready to 
go on a full year program 
when and if it becomes nec- 
essary. 

R. Would you modify any core 
courses? 

Z. I think that most of the ma- 
terial which is in the core 
courses needs to remain there. 
But I think thai many of the 
core courses need further re- 
finement and development. 

R. Are you happy with the phy- 
sical expansion of our cam- 
pus, and is this expansion in- 
dicative of a trend leading 
away from the image of a 
small, friendly college? 

Z. No — to your second ques- 
tion. I think the building pro- 
gram is excellent. However, I 
think it would be most un- 
fortunate if anyone got the 
idea that this program was 
most important for the growth 
of the school. These buildings 
are the tools of an even 
greater program — education. 

R. What do you think of the 
bomb shelters located in these 
new buildings? Do you think 
that these shelters are neces- 
sary? 

Z. I don't personally feel that 
they are necessary, although 
I actually only know of them 
by hearsay. I simply don't 
believe in spending a lot of 
money on Civil Defense. 

R. Is there anything more you 
would like to comment on? 

Z. The one thing I wish to em- 
phasize is my gladness at 
again being in what I feel is 
the essential work of the col- 
lege — teaching. Your ques- 
tion about the buildings is in- 
dicative of how incidental 
things can take the place of 
the primary. I'm not saying 
that we don't need these 
things. We need organization 
offices, administrative people, 
but these are all secondary to 
the classroom content. That's 
where the business of the 
college is carried on. 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
I 777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



SIX 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



Soccer Team Downs Bowdoin, 
Maine In Series Competition 



By AL WILLIAMS '64 

The Bates soccer team, with a 
great team effort, beat the Bow- 
doin Polar Bear last Tuesday 
4-2 and then outlasted the 
Maine Black Bear in a lack lust- 
er performance 3-0. The two 
wins, coupled with the Colby- 
Bowdoin 3-3 tie last Saturday, 
placed the Bobcats on top in the 
State Series competition. 

Bunten Stars 

It would be impossible to sin- 
gle out an individual performer 
in the victory over Bowdoin. 
Captain Lloyd Bunten played 
another good game at left wing 
as he continually set up the ball 
in front of the goal. Bob Lanz 
matched his scoring record for 
last year with another "routine" 
hat trick. The hustling center 
forward did everything but 
stand on his hands in scoring his 
first two tallies. 

Dan "Swede" Hagglund again 
amazed with his control of the 
soccer ball. Hagglund scored 
once on a penalty kick and set 
up Lanz's last tally on a beau- 



tiful kick in front of the Bow- 
doin nets. James Onyemelukwe, 
returning after a shoulder in- 
jury, deserves a lot of credit. The 
African goalie was everywhere 
in the third quarter when Bow- 
doin threatened to tie or pull 
into a lead. Jimmy's kicks con- 
tinually got the team out of 
tough spots. His teammates were 
so pleased that they carried him 
off the field on their shoulders. 

George Beebe, the tall center 
halfback, was Mr. Everything in 
the Bobcat secondary. "Beebs" 
was always there with either his 
foot or a head, or trapping the 
ball. Bob Thompson played his 
usual good game at fullback. 
Thompson certainly saved a 
score in the first half with his 
deflections in front of the Bobcat 
nets. 
Not Up 

After the fine win over Bow- 
doin the soccer team was not 
"up" for the University of Maine 
before a large Homecoming 
crowd. After a scoreless first 
half in which the Bates team did 
not hustle at all, the gallery 



wondered if the arnet booters 
would hit their stride. Lloyd 
Bunten's goal from outside the 
penalty area broke the spell and 
the outcome was never really in 
doubt. Bob Lanz scored the sec- 
ond tally a short time later. 
Freshman John Recchia got his 
first tally late in the game to up 
the margin to 3-0. 

Shutout for Goalie 

Goalie James Oneymelukwe, 
in posting his first shutout of the 
season, took defensive honors for 
the Garnet 11. Jimmie amazed 
the crowd by getting off kicks of 
more than half the length of the 
field. The goalie seemed to move 
almost instinctively, covering the 
Bates goal with his sure hands. 

The Bates team has upped its 
record to 5-1 with five straight 
home wins. The Bobcats will 
host the strong Colby Mules 
next Tuesday in a game sched- 
uled to start at 2:30. The Bates 
students seem to have developed 
the habit of taking time off from 
the books to watch the soccer 
matches. These "escapists" 
should be treated to a fine game 




Cross Country Team Extends Record To 
Seven Wins; McKusick Outstanding 



By AL HARVIE '65 

This past week saw Coach 
Walt Slovenski's cross-country 
team extend its record to seven 
wins while only losing one. Thus 
far this season they have racked 
up wins against Colby, W.P.I., 
M.I.T., Boston College, Boston 
University, University of Ver- 
mont, and University of New 
Hampshire, while its only loss 
has been to the University of 
Maine. 

Nosed Out 

Last Wednesday the 'Cats 
trekked to Franklin Park to run 
M.I.T. and Boston College. This 
was the first time that Bates' 
undefeated frosh, Karl McKus- 
ick, had been beaten, as Sumner 
Brown from M.I.T., who is also 
undefeated this season, outdis- 
tanced McKusick to the wire by 
a mere three seconds. Brown's 
time of 19 mins. 32 sees, is the 
fastest time this year on the 
Franklin Park course and the 
second fastest time ever. Fin- 
ishing third five seconds behind 



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McKusick was Jutras of Boston 
College, who is also one of the 
top distance men in New Eng- 
land. 

Capt. Eric Silverberg, who has 
been the number two man for 
Bates all season, finished fourth 
for Bates and eighth place in the 
meet. The valuability of the us 
ual third and fourth men were 
seen as Finn Wilhelmsen and 
Ken Trufant moved into the 
second and third spots for Bates 
as they finished fifth and seventh 
respectively in the meet. Frosh 
Paul Swensen moved back into 
the scoring column this week as 
he finished fifth for the Garnet. 

The final score was Bates 33, 
M.I.T. 42, and B.C. 45. 

'Cats Drop Giant Foes 

This past Saturday Coach 
Slovenski and his men were at 
Durham, N. H., to meet the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire and 
Boston University. Although the 
weather was much too warm for 
cross-country running, the Gar- 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Luni 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 




Dial 784-5241 



net placed the first three men to 
win the meet 31, 34 (U.N.H.), to 
75 (B.U.). Spurred on by 
Wednesday's defeat, Karl Mc- 
Kusick led the pack the entire 
route to tack another first place 
on his fine record. 

Consistency Shows 

After having a bad day in 
Boston, Capt. Eric Silverberg re- 
turned to the number two spot 
for Bates, finishing second in 
the meet also. Consistent Finn 
Wilhelmsen completed the first 
three place sweep by placing 
third as he continues to improve 
with every meet. Ken Trufant 
finished fourth for Bates in 12th 
spot with frosh Paul Swensen 
again gathering the final points 
in the 13th finishing position. 

This week the cross-country 
team faces two tasks, as Friday 
they return to Boston where 
both freshmen and varsity teams 
will compete in the Easterns 
(in this meet freshmen cannot 
compete on a varsity team) and 
Saturday the 'Cats will finish 
their inter-state competition 
with a dual meet at Bowdoin. 

Managers Applauded 

Corriments from Coach Sloven- 
ski this week include high praise 
for his two managers, Bruce 
Kennedy and Robert Tuck, both 
members of the class of '66. "At 
Bates we have always had fine 
managers who take pride in their 
jobs and do it in a professional 
manner. This year is no excep- 
tion, and I am very grateful to 
both of these men." 



(Talbot Photo) 

Cheerleader 

A smiling, cocky little Irish 
lass is another member of our 
rather outstanding cheering 
squad — Introducing Miss Cathie 
Lysaght from Pine Point, Maine. 
Cathie is a potential psych or 
English major with some thought 
of teaching in the future. 

Cathie is seen holding down 
the middle of our much im- 
proved cheering line. A new and 
very intricate maneuver was 

seen Friday night at the rally 
which can be accredited to 
Cathie's vivid imagination. The 
cheer with the pyramids and 
hard-hitting split jump is the 
one for which Cathie is respon- 
sible. 

Outside activities include 
treasurer of Newman Club and 
a membership on the executive 
board of Robinson Players. She 
also claims that she is an avid 
cohort of that scintillating group 
from Chase House called the 
"Sexy Seven!" 

An additional sidelight about 
Cathie is her summer job. For 
the past three summers she has 
labored as a machinist in the 
American Can Company of Port- 
land. There, she is affectionately 
called "Rosie the Riveter!" 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday. Oct. 30 
♦Soccer here with Colby 

Saturday, Nov. 2 

* Football at Bowdoin 

* Cross Country at Bowdoin 
♦Soccer at Bowdoin 



Monday, Nov. 4 
Cross Country 
(Boston) 



at Easterns 



Wednesday, Nov. 6 

Soccer at Clark 
•State Series Competition 



SERIES STANDINGS 





W 


L 


Maine 


1 


0 


Bowdoin 


1 


0 


Colby 


0 


1 


Bates 


0 


1 



State Series 

Information 

Away Games: 

Nov. 2 — 1:30 p.m. at Bowdoin 
Nov. 9 — 1:30 p.m. at Colby 

Ticket Sale — At the Bates Ath- 
letic Office beginning on the 
Monday prior to the game and 
ending at noon on Friday. 
Bales Students: Upon presen- 
tation of "ID" cards, students 
may purchase student tickets 
for $1.00. The $1.00 student 
ticket cannot be purchased on 
the day of the game anywhere. 
Student Guests: Tickets for 
guests, to be seated with stu- 
dents, may be purchased for 
$2.50 at the Bates Athletic 
Office only. They cannot be 
purchased anywhere on the 
day of the game. 
All Others: This is an all-re- 
served seat game. The price of 
admission is $2.50. Tickets can 
be purchased at the site of the 
game. 

Admission: 

Bates Students: Students hold- 
ing the $1.00 student tickets 
will be admitted only at the 
Visiting Student Entrances at 
Bowdoin and Colby Colleges. 
Students will be asked to 
show their Bates Identification 
Cards when they present their 
admission tickets at the host 
colleges. 

Student Guests and Others: 

Enter any gate. 

Important 

Ticket reservations may be 
made by telephone, but must be 
picked up by noon on the Friday 
before the game. Tickets cannot 
be reserved by telephone after 
this time. 

Refunds cannot be made on 
tickets after noon on the Friday 
before the game. 

For additional information tel- 
ephone Bates Athletic Office, 



★ COMING * 



SUN., NOV. 10 



CITY HALL AUD. 

PORTLAND, MAINE 



FOB THE FIRST TIME 
JUST — OFF THE 

ANDY WILLIAMS 
TV SHOW 



Bobby Selberg Presents 
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MAIL ORDERS NOW 

Checks payable to CHRISTY 
MINSTRELS. Forward with 
•tamped return-addressed enve- 
lope to Starbird Music Center, 
92 Oak St., Portland, Me. 

Go On Sale Oct. 28 

Orchestra (res.) ft and $3 

First Bal. (res.) $4.00 
2nd bal., sen. adm. $2.00 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

Nearest the College 

$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
ROOM LOUNGE 
TeL 784-5491 



TEXACO HEATING OILS 

JIMMY'S 
GAS STATIONS, INC. 
On Route 100, Auburn, Maine 

BEST REST ROOMS IN 
NEW ENGLAND 

O 

JIMMY'S DINER 

FOR FINE FOODS 
On Route 100, Auburn, Maine 



FERN'S 
TAXI 

784-5469 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 

Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



41 
SEVEN 




Bobcat Of The Week 




This week's Bobcat of the 
Week is an African student, 
James Onyemelukwe, from 
Nnewi-onitsha, Nigeria. Better 
known to his American friends 
at Jimmie, he returned from a 
painful shoulder injury to lead 
the Garnet soccer teams to an 
impressive 4-2 win over the 
Bowdoin Polar Bear and a re- 
peat 3-0 conquest of the Uni- 
versity of Maine. Jimmie was 
"there" with his sure hands in 
the third quarter against Bow- 
doin when the Polar Bear was 
continually pressing the Garnet 
defense and in the first half 
against Maine when the Bobcat 
offense lost its zip. 

Teammates Applaud 

So superb was his kicking and 
defense of the goal that after the 
game was over his teammates 
paid him the honor of carrying 
him off the field. Against Maine 
he posted his first shutout of the 
year. 

Jimmy is a sophomore chem- 
istry major and is interested in 
going into pharmacy after grad- 
uation. 



SAM'S 
Esso Servicenter 

534 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

To All Bates Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment, 
Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 

Service 
— — — — — WW 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 




O. C. Line Storms Through (Peabody Photo) 



By DON KING '64 

The O.C. "boys" finally did it 
— they broke into the win col- 
umn with a valiant effort against 
an East Parker crew that didn't 
amount to a thing. There's not 
really much to say about the 
game except to mention the tre- 
mendous display of valor exhib- 
ited by the Playboys. Six of 
them managed to appear in the 
pouring drizzle at game time. 
Fortunately for the "pugilists," 
no one from East Parker showed, 
so their initial (and possibly fi- 
nal) victory was recorded as a 
result of a forfeit. 

J.B. Clinches 

J.B. clinched the "A" league 
championship Sunday afternoon, 
knocking off a stubborn West 
Parker unit 20-12. Ron Vance 
appeared to be the entire story 
as he scored twice and threw 
for a third. Ron had his girl on 
the sidelines and this might 
have added that little extra 
spark necessary for a champion- 
ship performance. The biggest 
obstacle for J.B. to overcome 
was the "savage" elbows of Paul 
Williams, as Paul appeared 
tougher than ever this Sunday 
afternoon. 

The explanation for East Park- 
er not showing for their sched- 
uled contest with the "Playboys" 
might be connected in some way 
with the 24-0 whipping they took 
from Roger Bill earlier in the 
week. Roger Bill's Italian field 
general Sam Aloisi led the 
"Spaghetti Benders" attack with 
three paydirt pitches. 

Middle Rolls 

In B league action, Smith Mid- 



dle has practically wrapped up 
the title as they remain unde- 
feated after three games. Their 
most impressive victory was a 
30-0 trouncing over J.B. Lee 
Tamis was outstanding as he had 
a hand in each of the thirty 
pointers in addition to roaring 
into the station three times on 
his own. John Strassburger 
proved that pool wasn't his only 
accomplishment as he teamed 
up with Sam Withers to steam- 
roll over the J.B. forward wall. 

There were two nominations 
for Intramural Man of the 
Week with Lee Tamis finally 
taking the honors. Ron Vance 
was a close second as a result 
of his fine performance Sunday 
after a tough weekend. 

Standings: 

A 



Garnet Travels To Brunswick 
To Meet Powerful Polar Bears 







W 


L 


T 


JB 




3 


0 


0 


OC 




1 


1 


1 


WP 




1 


1 


1 


RB 




1 


1 


1 


EP 




0 


3 


0 




B 








SM 




3 


0 




OC 




1 


1 




SN 




1 


1 




RB 




1 


1 




JB 




1 


2 




SS 




0 


2 






C 








SM 




2 


1 




SN 




2 


1 




JB 




2 


1 




SS 




1 


1 




WP 




1 


1 




EP 




0 


3 




Upon 


receiving 


numerous 


re 



quests and comments from you 
many racing fans, I am contin- 



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BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE at 

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Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates- Affiliated People 



By LEIGH CAMPBELL '64 

Whittier Field in Brunswick 
will be the scene of this Satur- 
day's attempt by the Bates 
football team to bounce back 
from its 49-0 pounding by 
Maine. The opposition is Bow- 
doin; game time will be 1:30 
p. m. The Polar Bears of Coach 
Nels Corey will enter the game 
with a balanced attack which 
has produced an impressive rec- 
ord of four wins and one defeat, 
one of the finest slates in New 
England. Bowdoin holds victor- 
ies of 28-6 over Tufts, 32-0 over 
Wesleyan, 20-0 over Williams, 
and 21-13 over Colby; its only 
loss was by a 3-0 score to un- 
defeated Amherst. This year's 
Bowdoin-Bates clash will be the 
66th renewal of a series begun 
in 1889. The Polar Bears hold a 
lead of 35-23, and seven games 
have ended in ties. 

Sharp Backfield 

Bowdoin this year has seen 
the steady improvement of many 
of last year's performers and 
the emergence of several good 
sophomores. The offensive stand- 
out of last week's rallying win 
over Colby was sophomore half- 
back Paul Soule of Portland. He 
carried the ball 21 times against 
the Mules for 103 yards and one 
touchdown, and caught a pass 
from quarterback Bob Harring- 
ton for 17 yards to set up an- 
other score. 

Soule, a younger brother of 
University Of Maine guard Phil 



Soule, was singled out by Coach 
Corey as the best Bowdoin play- 
er of the day against Colby. He 
was by no means the only 
threat, however. Harrington, last 
year's All-Maine quarterback as 
a sophomore, showed why on 
Saturday. His passing gained 
96 yards, and he clinched the 
Polar Bear victory with a 49- 
yard touchdown in the fourth 
period. Many of his passes have 
been aimed at sophomore end 
Jim MacAllen, who has been 
outstanding all season. 

Line Tough 

The line has likewise been 
impressive, although not quite 
as big as Maine's. Steve In- 
gram, Tom Zilinsky, and Captain 
Frank Drigotas of Auburn, along 
with backs Bill Mathews and 
Bill Farley have been giving 
ball carriers fine blocking in ev- 
ery game. They have also per- 
formed well on defense. Bow- 
doin until Saturday had allowed 
only one touchdown and a field 
goal in four games. The mem- 
bers of the Little Three, Wes- 
leyan, Amherst, and Williams, 
were not allowed across the Po- 
lar Bear goal line in successive 
weeks. 

Try for Repeat 

So the Bobcats will be up 
against another strong club this 
week, and it is hoped that the 
remembrance of last year's fine 
13-3 victory in the rain at Gar- 
celon Field will spur Bates on 
to repeat the act in 1963. 




Lanz Pursues Ball Against Bowdoin (Talbot Photo) 



uing "Horses to Watch" for the 

final two weeks of racing at the 
Fairgrounds. 

The Big M — Clockers say pay- 



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Office Supply Co., Inc. 
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249 Main St., Lewiston, Maine| 
Phone 782-0141 



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Mister Mike — Working well 
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Don Rhap — Ready to run up a 

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Open Daily 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 



4> 

EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, OCTOBER 30, 1963 



Mighty Maine Wallops Cats, 49-0 

Huge Line Paves Victory Path; 
DeVarney, Haley Lead Offense 




With NICK BASBANES 

Someone once told me that the only way to teach a child 
to stop playing with matches was to let him burn his fingers. 
So too, perhaps the same philosophy could be applied to mak- 
ing predictions. The only way to teaeh a self-proclaimed 
clairvoyant the fallibility of his judgements is to let the roof 
fall in on him. I am referring of course, in all humbleness, 
to my two predictions of last week. The first one, concern- 
ing the Bates-Maine game, found me on the short end 49-0, 
and the second dealt with the Giants-Browns game. The 
Giants proved that the Browns weren't the world's best, and 
they drubbed them 33-6. Apparently, when the Giants co- 
ordinate their defense, even steamrollers can't get more than 
thirty-nine yards. 

As for the Bear-Bobcat fracus, the only way to describe 
the greedy victors is big. Their size and depth completely 
severed any Garnet prayer of victory. And the Bobcats 
didn't look that bad, either: the Bears just looked too good. 
Time after time they used their powerful line to open and 
trap the middle for their elusive backs. They blocked and 
moved with such precision that it was impossible to contain 
them. Special mention should be made with regard to their 
outstanding quarterback Dick DeVarney. His passes were 
precise (though the blocking he had didn't hamper matters) 
and his agility phenomenal. The only comic note in the con- 
test was Maine's futile effort in the game's closing moments 
to run up the scoreboard, with a last ditch field goal attempt. 
Evidently, they wanted to prove as much as possible that 
their last stint at Garcelon field would be a smashing suc- 
cess. This they proved anyway; what was vindicated more 
profoundly, however was this school's decision to drop Maine 
from the schedule. 

The Homecoming crowd wasn't completely frustrated, as 
Friday afternoon the Bates soccer team dropped Maine 3-0. 
Even though the team was reported to look sub-par in this 
game, they still had little trouble in taking the Bears. This 
is Maine's first year with a varsity soccer team. In State 
Series competition Bates remains undefeated with the cru- 
cial tilt today against Colby. The Mules reportedly have 
a fine team this year, and the winner of today's tilt could 
foresee the eventual state champ. They tied Bowdoin last 
Saturday, however. As for the 'Cats, they have but one loss 
to their record, that being their first game against Nichols. 
They have improved consistently and presently stand as un- 
doubtedly Bates' finest soccer team. The whole team has 
been working together as a well meshed unit, and we're pull- 
ing for them to claim the state crown. 

Last Saturday also provided an opportunity to see last 
year's line and head basketball and tennis coach Vern Ullom. 
Ullom, who filled in for Dr. Peck while he was abroad, is 
now coaching at Colby and was here to scout the game. He 
expressed happiness in seeing the campus and a lot of his old 
friends. As for the State Series, he stressed Maine's Yankee 
Conference schedule, not so much its size, that produced its 
formidability in the state. When asked about his freshman 
football squad, he reported that he had quite a few boys that 
will bolster future Colby teams. 

As for predictions this week. I'm laying low and keeping 
my head deep in the sand. I don't want to be a jinx to any- 
one. 



TURGEON'S 


Clark's Drug Store 


PRESCRIPTION 


PHARMACY 


DRUGS CHEMICALS 


A. Turgeon, Reg. Ph. 


392 Lisbon St. Lewislon, Me. 


BIOLOGICALS 


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FOR ALL MAKES 






By DON DELMORE '64 
A talented University of Maine squad suceeded in spoiling the Saturday afternoon fea- 
ture of Homecoming Weekend with a 49-0 whitewash of the Bobcats. The great depth of 
Maine proved to be too much for the smaller and injury-riddled 'Cats to handle. Sopho- 
more quarterback Dick DeVarney lived up to all his pre-game notices as he brilliantly 
directed and passed the heavily* 
favored Black Bears to their 
crushing victory. 

No Time Wasted 

Maine elected to receive the 
kickoff and promptly drove six- 
ty-two yards to paydirt as first 
period action began. DeVarney 
ignited the drive, picking up a 
first down on a keeper around 
right end. He then took to the 
air and hit ends Dick Flaherty 
and Ned Sherry for two more 
first downs. Halfback Mike Ha- 
ley scored the first of his two 
touchdowns on a four yard 
plunge with only five minutes 
gone in the first quarter. Roger 
Boucher split the unrights to 
push Maine into a 7-0 lead. 

Following the first of several 
Maine kickoffs, the 'Cats failed 
to move against the hard charg- 
ing Maine defensive unit. On 
third down, guard Reggie Clark 
fell on a Bates fumble at the 
twenty yard line to set up the 
second Maine score. Halfback 
Earl Cooper dove in from the one 
to raise the score to 13-0 with 
4:45 remaining in the first quar- 
ter. 

Few Questions Asked 

Once again the Black Bears 
contained the 'Cats and brought 
about a punting situation. A for- 
ty-three yard kick by Captain 
Paul Planchon was returned to 
the Bates forty-five. Six plays 
later Haley smashed off left 
tackle for six yards and another 
touchdown. Boucher added the 
conversion to run the score to 
20-0 with only :15 left in the 
first period. It was by now ap- 
parent that the only question 
left to be answered was just how 
much this classy Maine eleven 
would be able to roll up their 



Maine End Saunters Over Goal (Peek Photo) 



mounting score. 

The Bobcats were forced to en- 
ter the game without the ser- 
vices of senior guard John 
Schatz, and halfbacks John Yus- 
kis and Archie Lanza. Planchon 
and tackle Ted Davis were 
forced to the sidelines for the 
second half as injuries contin- 
ued to hamper the 'Cats' attack. 

Vital Goal Line Stand 

Maine continued to completely 
dominate play throughout the 
second period and the second 
half. The only Bobcat scoring 
threat of the afternoon came in 
the third period as a sixty-seven 
yard drive died on the Maine 
two yard line. Quarterback Ran- 
dy Bales initiated the drive 
with two sweeps around the 
ends for a first down. He next 
threw to Harry Mossman and 
Mike Carr for two more Bobcat 
first downs. 



However, at this point the 
Black Bear starting team was 
recalled to action to kill the 

threat although the score was 
36-0 with very little chance 
of any serious challenge by 
the 'Cats. This move by the 
University of Maine coaching 
staff seemed to take a little away 
from the otherwise faultless im- 
pression projected by this tal- 
ented squad. 

Mossman Shines 

A glance at the statistics pre- 
sented below will indicate how 
soundly the 'Cats were defeat- 
ed. One of the only bright spots 
of the afternoon was the out- 
standing play of Harry Mossman. 
Bringing down Maine halfback 
Ron Lanza, brother of Archie, 
after a thirty yard pursuit was 
one of the few things Bobcat 
rooters could find to cheer about 
this dismal afternoon. 



MIGHTY MAINE 

Maine Bates 

First Downs 27 7 

Yards gained rushing 280 17 

Yards gained passing 152 115 

Total yards gained 432 132 

Forward passes: 

Attempted 19 17 

Completed 12 6 

Had intercepted 0 3 

Punts, average 3-36.3 5-25.4 

Yards lost, penalties 10-90 6-55 

Fumbles 1 3 

Opponents' recovered 3 0 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

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218 Main St. 

Next to Bus Terminal 



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Phone 4-7521 Lewislon, Maine 
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' LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 
DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 

- Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

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Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 

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Dial 783-2044 



Hates 




Stuctmt 



HO 



Vol. XC, No. 7 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



By Subscription 



Poets Invade 
ML David To 
Aid UNICEF 

For the benefit of UNICEF, a 
new "international theme" was 
set forth on the top of Mt. Da- 
vid last Thursday. The program, 
presented on behalf of the Unit- 
ed Nations International Chil- 
dren's Emergency Fund, con- 
sisted of folk songs and dances 
from various nations. 

At the outset Professor John 
Tagliabue performed a Japanese 
dance in the garb of an evil 
spirit. The spirit frightens a 
small boy (portrayed by Brian 
Deevey) who is standing near 
by. The boy runs, but the spirit 
calls him back to be soothed by 
music and song. 

His fear is eased by a medley 
of African folk songs by David 
Dhliwayo and Ali Hersi and by 
a Japanese ritual dance per- 
formed by Yoko Hirasawa. He is 
further soothed by poetry read- 
ings and by American folk songs. 

The conclusion of the unre- 
hearsed, often spontaneous, pro- 
gram was a dance by the placat- 
ed boy and the now benevolent 
spirit. 



Hebrew Courses 
Open To Students 

A course in the Hebrew lan- 
guage sponsored by the Jewish 
Community Center is being of- 
fered to Bates students. 

Both beginner and advanced 
classes are taught by Dr. Arbel- 
li, principal of the Hebrew 
School at the center. 

The twelve participating Bates 
students of several faiths give 
varying reasons for their inter- 
est in the program. Although 
some have had previous training 
others have joined simply through 
intellectual curiosity. Too, those 
interested in th ministry realize 
that training in Hebrew or 
Greek is essential. 

All of the participants, what- 
ever their motives, express their 
thankfulness in having joined 
the program. If any interested 
students would also like to join 
this program, they are advised to 
see Bernard Gilman '66 or Ir- 
win Flashman '65. 



Bates Affirmative 
Finishes Second At 
Boston Tourney 

In their first competition of 
the season, representatives of the 
Bates Debating team compiled a 
two won and four lost record at 
the Greater Boston Tourney this 
past week-end. 

Held at MIT the tournament 
was unclassified, or open to both 
novice and varsity teams. 

Defeat Bowdoin 

On the topic, Resolved: The 
Federal Government should 
guarantee an opportunity for 
higher education to qualified high 
school graduates, the Bates af- 
firmative team of Steve Schaffer 
'65 and George Strait '66 defeat- 
ed Bowdoin, but lost to Eastern 
Nazarene and MIT. 

The negative team, Norm Da- 
vis '65 and Roy Horwitz '66, also 
defeated Bowdoin, but lost to 
Harvard and MIT. 

In the team results, Harvard 
won both the affirmative and 
negative divisions. The Bates af- 
firmative, with host MIT not 
taking part in the awards, fin- 
ished second in the competition. 

Accompanying the team as a 
judge was Mr. Richard Warye of 
the Speech department. 



Faculty Vote Requires Students 
To Attend Colloquim Program 

At a special meeting last Wednesday the faculty voted to require student attendance 
at the Centennial Convocation and Colloquim to be held later this month. The special 
meeting was called, and the faculty acted, after the poor student attendance at the con- 
vocation program over Homecoming weekend. 
Feeling that there must be an* 



SEA Meeting 

Dr. Sidney Jackman of the 
History department will address 
the next meeting of the Student 
Education Association. His topic 
will be "The Role of the Private 
School in American Education." 

The meeting will be held at 
the home of Professor Cum- 
mings, 32 Frye Street, next 
Tuesday evening. It will begin 
at 7:30 p. m. 

The SEA is comprised primar- 
ily of students who are inter- 
ested in going into secondary 
school teaching, but club presi- 
dent David Zuretti '65 hopes 
that any and all students who 
wish to listen to Dr. Jackman's 
comments will attend. 



Phi Beta Kappa 
Adds Bowie '64 
To Membership 

The Phi Beta Kappa chapter 
of Bates College, the Gamma 
Chapter in Maine, has elected 
Norman Bowie '64 to member- 
ship. At a meeting held last 
week, the Bates group consid- 
ered all seniors whose Quality 
Point Ratio for the previous 
four semesters averages 3.7 or 
more. Bowie was their only se- 
lection. 

Election to this academic hon- 
or society rest primarily on 
academic excellence, but service 
and general contribution to the 
college are also evaluated. 

Philosophy Major 

Bowie, who is doing Honors in 
Philosophy, has achieved a 
straight A average in each of the 
past three semesters. He has also 
served as president of his class 
since the Spring of his freshman 
year. A member of various com- 
mittees, including the Concert- 
Lecture Series, Bowie is also a 
Varsity Debater for the third 
consecutive year. 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa af- 
ter the Junior Year is an honor 
which is not voted every year. 
A student so honored must be 
considered an outstanding choice 
who is certain to continue to 
achieve the outstanding scholar- 
ship which he has demonstrated 
to date. 

In the Spring the Bates 
Chapter will meet again to se- 
lect other members of the Se- 
nior class who have completed 
a record of outstanding acade- 
mic achievement. 



audience for the over one hun- 
dred representatives of other 
colleges, and fearful that if left 
to student choice very few 
would attend, the faculty decid- 
ed that they were faced with an 
immediate crisis. They author- 

C, A. Sponsors 
Tutorial Course 
A t LewistonH. S. 

By NANCY VAIL '66 

The tutorial project in Lewis- 
ton High School, which began 
last year under the auspices of 
the Christian Association, is be- 
ing set up again this year. Fol- 
lowing the example of the 
Northern Student Movement Tu- 
torials, students from Bates will 
give free tutoring to secondary 
school students. 

The need for a project of this 
type was determined by the 
great number of high school 
dropouts in Lewiston. Through 
the tutoring experience, the tu- 
tors hope to initiate in the stu- 
dents a desire to learn, and to 
impress upon them the value of 
continuing with their education. 
Implicit in the tutorial idea is 
the necessity of going beyond a 
mere academic relationship be- 
tween teacher and pupil. 

By the time he has reached 
high school, a student who has 
for various reasons had trouble 
with 'his subjects and is not in- 
terested in school must be given 
some incentive — some reason to 
work. The purpose of the tutor- 
ial project is more than just 
helping students to pass their 
courses. 

As last year, tutoring will take 
place at the high school on 
weekday afternoons. Tutors, 
each teaching from one to three 
pupils, will tutor in one subject 
for one or two hours per week. 
Evaluation meetings will be held 
periodically to help determine 
the effects of the project on the 
students. Mr. Lapointe, a guid- 
ance counselor at the high 
school, will be available to help 
with any problems that arise. 

To supplement the project and 
to further stimulate the tutees, 
students will be urged to attend 
the concert lecture series at 
Bates. A reading discussion 
group is also being set up this 
year in the high school. 

Interested students will read 
specified books chosen with the 
help of the high school. These 
books will then be discussed in 
small groups, enabling the stu- 
dents to express their ideas in- 
dividually, thereby awakening 
an interest in their potential and 
desire for knowledge. 



ized the following schedule for 
Tuesday and Wednesday, No- 
vember 19 and 20. The Convoca- 
tion is scheduled for the 20th, 
and panels will be held through- 
out the two days. 

Tuesday at 8 a. m., the regu- 
lar Tuesday 10 o'clock classes 
will meet. Tuesday at 9 a.m., the 
regular Tuesday 11 o'clock class- 
es will be held. Classes will be 
suspended for the rest of the 
day. 

On Wednesday, the regularly 
scheduled 8 a. m. classes are the 
only ones which will meet. 

In the place of classes during 
the hours that Centennial activi- 
ties are scheduled, the faculty 



has voted that all students 
should attend at least two of the 
six panels plus the Convocation. 

Each student will be given an 
opportunity to elect, on a first 
come basis, the two panels he 
prefers to attend. Admission 
cards, which will be issued — 
two for the panel sessions and 
one for the Convocation — in 
the name of each student, will be 
collected for all functions. 

A cut will be charged against 
the student's record in the Reg- 
istrar's Office for non-attendance 
at each of the two panel ses- 
sions. An overcut will be as- 
sessed against the semester QPR 
of students not at the Convoca- 
tion. 



Fifty Maine H S Debaters 
Invade Campus Friday 



If there seem to be more than 
the usual number of bewildered 
faces on campus this Friday (dis- 
counting Bates students who are 
just starting, finishing, or mud- 
dling through their first "set" of 
exams) they will probably be- 
long to some of the two hundred 
peop,le expected to visit Bates as 
part of its Bates League Discus- 
sion Contest and Debate Clinic. 

Fifty Maine high schools will 
be represented at this, the fif- 
tieth anniversary of the Clinic, 
which will be marked by a spe- 
cial celebration and the presence 
of many distinguished guests. 

The clinic will begin on Fri- 
day afternoon at 2:30, with the 
final registration, followed by 
brief meetings of coaches and 
participants in the Little Thea- 
ter. Addresses by Mr. Denis Blais 
of the AFL-CIO, and Dr. Charles 
Branch of the AMA will be giv- 
en for the panel discussion: 
"What should be the role of the 
Federal Government in provid- 



Calendar 



Wednesday. Nov. 6 
WAA meeting, 6:30-9:00 
Math Special Help Classes, 

Libbey No. 1 and No. 8, 7:00- 

9:00 

Vespers, Chapel, 9:30-10:00 
Proctor meeting, Conference 
Room, 9:00-10:00 

Friday, Nov. 8 

Sophomore Class Rally, Alum- 
ni Gym, 7:30-8: 15 
Debate Clinic 

Saturday, Nov. 9 
Football at Colby 
Dance, Chase Hall, 8:00-11:45 

Sunday, Nov. 10 
Stu-G Freshman Installation, 
President's Dinner for Stu- 
dents from Abroad 



ing medical care for the aged?" 

Bates' own distinguished De- 
bate Coach and Professor of 
Speech, Brooks Quimby, will 
then addres the participants on 
the techniques of discussion and 
debate, after which they will 
leave the auditorium for panel 
discussions at both the competion 
(Varsity) and exhibition (No- 
vice) levels. These panels will 
be under the general direction of 
several outstanding Bates stu- 
dent debaters. 

Evening events of this year's 
program will begin at 5:15, with 
a dinner for the honored guests, 
which will be sponsortd by the 
Bates College Club, George Men- 
del '35, president of the club, 
presiding. The guests will be 
greeted, via tape recording, by 
A. Craig Baird, a former pro- 
fessor of forensics at Bates, who 
founded the Bates League in 
1913, and originated Internation- 
al Debating in the United States. 

With Professor Baird as their 
Debate Coach, several Bates 
teams were recognized as Na- 
tional Champions. He has since 
gone on to gain personal recog- 
nition at the University of Iowa 
as one of the nation's foremost 
forensic authorities. 

This anniversary of the Bates 
League will celebrate the re- 
union and recognition of the 
members of the first champion- 
ship teams. Bates graduates on 
these teams include Brooks 
Quimby '18, Clarence Goujd '19, 
Robert Dyer '18, and Russell 
Taylor '22. 

The League will also honor 
its coaches who have more than 
ten years of experience in the 
field of debating. Honored among 
these coaches will be Bates 
(Continued on page three) 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



Notes From Underground 



(The following minutes were 
taken at last week's Student 
Senate meeting. These meetings 
are held on Tuesday evenings 
at six p. m. in the downstairs 
classroom of Libb ey Forum. 
These meetings are open to eve- 
ryone.) 

The first meeting of the Bates 
College Student Senate was 
called to order by President Rob- 
ert Ahern at 4: 19 p. m. in the 
Costello Room of Chase Hall on 
October 30, 1963. 

President Ahern opened the 
meeting with a few introductory 
remarks about the obligations 
and goals of the Senate. 

The Senate elected Cris Chris- 
tensen as secretary. 

Jim Aikman was elected trea- 
surer. 

It was decided that the Senate 
meet regularly at 6 p. m. in the 
downstairs classroom in Libbey 
Forum on Tuesday evenings. 
Gretchi Ziegler was appointed to 
obtain a permanent blue slip for 
this time and place. 

Committees 

President Ahern then asked 
for volunteers for the various 
committees. It was decided that 
assignments for the Freshman 
•Orientation Committee, the Ral- 
lies Committee, and the Direc- 
tories Committee were unneces- 
sary at this time. 

The president then suggested 
that the Food Committees be 
designated as part of the Men's 
and Women's Councils. The 
Councils would have closer com- 
munication with the separate 
dining hall directors than would 
the Senate. 

It was further decided that the 
treasurer could absorb the duties 
of the Budget Committee, mak- 
ing this committee unnecessary. 
The committee assignments are: 
Concert-Lecture Series, Linda 
Glazier, Ned Brooks; Elections, 
Donna Whitney, Ned Brooks; 
Publicity, Marilyn Fuller; Trans- 
portation, Carol Kinney, Max 
Steinheimer (tentatively); So- 
cial Activities, Paul Sadlier 
(chairman), Howie Dorfman, 
Sally M. Smyth, Prudy Grant; 
Campus Relations, Bob Ahern; 
Extra-Curricular Activities, Jim 
Aikman, M. Fuller; Chapel Pro 
gram, Ned Brooks. 

It was decided that the min- 
utes of the Senate meeting 
should be mimeographed and 
distributed to all the dorms, to 
Fiske and Commons, to all the 
advisors, and to the Men's and 
Women's Councils. 
Two More Advisors 

The Senate then discussed the 
selection of its advisors. Fuller 
moved that the Senate choose 
two advisors in addition to the 

Dean of Men and Dean of Wo- 

_ _ 

"HOTEL HOLLY" 

BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 
Main Street Lewiston 

+ + 



men. This motion was passed. A 
tentative list of the advisors was 
drawn up and these faculty 
members will be contacted to 
see if they are willing and avail- 
able to serve as advisors. 

President Ahern then outlined 
the procedure for the future 
meetings of the Senate. Robert's 
Rules of Order will be the guide 
to procedure. 

Dorfman asked about the pro- 
cedure of making recommenda- 
tions to the Student Conduct 
Committee. President Ahern ex- 
plained that the recommendation 
would be made by the Men's or 
Women's Judiciary Committee. 
The Men's Judiciary Committee 
is made up of the men Senators 
and is chaired by the Chairman 
of the Men's Council. The Wo- 
men's Judiciary Committee is 
made up of the women Senators 
and is chaired by the Chairman 
of Women's Council. 

Kinney moved to adjourn. 
Ziegler seconded. The meeting 



WCBB 

Tonight 

7:30 THE OBSERVING EYE — 

"Amphibians" with David 
S. Bonney from Boston's 
Museum of Science. 

8:00 LYRICS AND LEGENDS — 

"Lining out" songs and 
"Sharpe note" singing are 
explained on "Negro Re- 
ligious Music". 

8:30 COURT OF REASON — 

"Military Take-Overs in 
Latin America." Round ta- 
ble discussion with moder- 
ator Harry Schwartz of 
The New York Times. 

Tomorrow Night 

7:30 FOCUS ON BEHAVIOR — 

"No Two Alike." New test- 
ing methods for measuring 
and increasing human ca- 
pabilities. 

adjourned at 5: 15 p. m. 

Respectively submitted, 

Ruth L. Christensen, 
Secretary 



Guidance 



INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Miss Evelyn Rahm, represent- 
ing the U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH 
SERVICE, will interview men 
and women interested in Gradu- 
ate Training and Careers in 
Health Education. There are also 
opportunities for summer in- 

8:00 SCIENCE REPORTER >— 

Weekly report on the lat- 
est news from the rapidly 
changing world of science. 

9:09 THE OPEN MIND — "What 
Hope for the Fabulous In- 
valid." Weekly public af- 
fairs programs. 

Friday Night ' 
7:30 THE HISTORY OF AMER- 
ICAN PHILOSOPHY — 

"The Genteel Tradition and 
the Pragmatic Revolt." Col- 
lege course for teachers. 
8:00 SIR KENNETH CLARK ON 

ART — "Goya," the first of 
five revolutionary painters, 
to be discussed by the 
world-renowned art critic. 



ternships for undergraduates. 
Miss Rahm will be on campus 
Friday, November 8. All inter- 
ested students should sign up im- 
mediately at the Placement Of- 
fice. 

Sgt. Clinton Bosworth and Sgt. 
Albert Martel will be in Lower 
Chase Hall Tuesday, November 
12 to interview men interested 
in the U. S. AIR FORCE Officer 
Training Program. 

SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

The United Church Board for 
World Ministries is seeking able 
men and women interested in 
OVERSEAS SERVICE. Career 
and short term opportunities are 
available for teachers. Those 
who are members of a Protestant 
Christian Church and are inter- 
ested in this program should 
write to Loy L. Long, Personnel 
Secretary, 14 Beacon Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: TOM CASHMAN 



Telstar beamed the first transoceanic telecast, and Tom 
Cashman (B.A., 1957) assumed the responsibility for train- 
ing personnel and scheduling tours of the antenna complex 
at Andover, Maine. He also spoke to numerous civic and 
social groups on the various aspects of Telstar. 

Not all of Tom's assignments have offered him the 
opportunity to participate in a historical event, but as a 
member of A. T. & T.'s Long Lines Department he is in- 
volved in the amazing communications advances of today. 
Long Lines is responsible for long distance communica- 




tions, which must be effectively integrated with local ser- 
vices and internal communications systems. 

Tom is presently Information Supervisor at White 
Plains, New York, where he is responsible for keeping the 
Eastern Area Long Lines employees informed of current 
telephone developments of local and national importance. 

Tom Cashman, like many young men, is impatient to 
make things happen for his company and himself. There 
are few places where such restlessness is more welcomed 
or rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 



TELEPHONE MAN-0F-THE-M0NTH 



LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 
DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 m LOAD 
• Pressing on Premises • 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



« » 



u "" ■■ <<.» 



— 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



THREE 



Academic Hoods 
Identify School 
And Add Color 

Academic processions have al- 
ways been colorful occasions. 
The line of marching professors, 
dressed in robes and hoods, is 
one of academia's brighter tra- 
ditions. While often regarded as 
little more than a pain-in-the- 
neck by teachers today, the cus- 
tom of academic processions and 
hoods once served a highly use- 
ful purpose. 

The gray cloisters of the 
twelfth and thirteenth century 
universities and monasteries 
were brightened by the gaudy 
hats that were attached in hood- 
like style to the black flowing 
robes which protected students 
and clerics from the damp coid 
of medieval buildings. 

With the advent of central 
heating, the robes were no long- 
er necessary for warmth, but 
the tradition continued. The 
capes and hoods were modified 
and special trimmings and lin- 
ings added. 

The academic tradition fol- 
lowed the British to this coun- 
try in colonial times in a mot- 
ley array of color. In 1893, one 
Colonel McCook of Princeton 
University seized upon the idea 
of standardizing the academic 
regalia so that a scholar's alma 
mater was identifiable by the ar- 
rangement of college colors on 
the heraldic shield of cloth 
draped at his back. 

Doctor Muller, a Bates pro- 
fessor, says of the tradition that 
professors wear on their backs: 
"They're an ornament to what 
would otherwise be a rather 
drab occasion." 




Havers: World Traveller 
And Art Collector 

By SUE LORD '66 

Joining the faculty as an Instructor in French is Robert J. 
Havers. Born in Arkansas, Havers has lived in Texas for 
most of his life, and was graduated from Rice Institute (now 
Rice University) where he earned both his bachelor's degree 
and his master's. 

Having completed his degree* 
requirements, Havers went 



Edward S. Newsham in Laboratory (Fullenwider Photo) 



Newsham Seeks Freedom, 
Intellectual Stimulation 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main Si. Lewision 

Next to Bus Terminal 



BERMUDA 

COLLEGE WEEK 



By JUDY MARDEN '66 

A new addition to the Bates 
faculty in the Chemistry Depart- 
ment is Edward S. Newsham, 
formerly an employee of the Du- 
pont Company. 

Since both he and his wife are 
graduates of Allegheny College 
in Pennsylvania, they are famil- 
iar with small colleges. "I like 
the more intimate contact with 
the students," said Newsham. 
"At large schools, students seem 
to be mostly numbers. Also, I 
feel that the caliber of students 
at a small college is likely to be 
higher than at a larger one. 
There is more intellectual stim- 
ulation." 

Working for Ph.D. 

From Allegheny College, Mr. 
Newsham entered the graduate 
school of the University of Buf- 
falo, to continue his study of 
chemistry. He is presently work- 
ing for his Ph.D., which he ex- 
pects to receive in February. 
His thesis for the degree is en- 
titled "Shock Tube Pyroleses of 
Some Organic Iodides." 

Leaving the University of 



EMPIRE 



NOW [ 

playing! 

WALT DISNEY'S \ 

"The Incredible 
Journey" J 

i SUN. - MON. - TUES. j 



UERRY LEWIS! 




MARCH 22 APRIL 11 

Everyday packed with action^ 
...new friends... fun! 



SITIV. — Get arquainted dance. 
(Wear Bermudas!) MOM.- 
College Day at the beach. Tal- 
bot Brothers Calypso, College 
Queen Contest, barbecue lunch. 
TIES.— Jazz session. Limbo 
contest, buffet lunch. WED. 
» —Cruise to St. George, Steel 
a Band entertainment, Gombey 
dancers, refreshments. 
THITItS. -On your own: 
swim, shop, sightsee, sports. 
Fill. -College Week Revue - 
entertainment. Tennis finals. 



All these . . . and lots more 
complimentary activities! 

See your 
Campus Organizer now ! d 

The Bermuda Trade Development Board 
620 Fifth Avenue, New York. N.Y. 10020 




r 



PRISCI LLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 

Continuous Fri. from 5 p.m. 

Sat. from 1 p.m. j 
Sun. from 3 p. m. 

"The Man From 
The Diner's Club" 

Danny Kaye 
Cara Williams 
Martha Hyer 



Jason And The 
Argonauts" 

Todd Armstrong 
Nancy Kovack 
(Color - WideScreen) 



Buffalo, Newsham began work 
immediately for D u p o n t — 
he planned to try working in in- 
dustry for five years, and then 
change to teaching if he 
found industry unsatisfactory. 
He stayed for two and a half 
years, but discovered that "in 
big ipdustry, they are out to 
make money. You're limited in 
things you're allowed to do, and 
very greatly limited in things 
you want to do. As a teacher, 
you have more freedom to pick 
the things you want to study — 
such as the reactions you want 
to concentrate on." 

"Both my wife and I are 'out- 
doorsy' type people," said Mr. 
Newsham, laughing about his re- 
cent chaperoning of an O. C. 
canoe trip. "Next time I'll take 
her with me." Both the News- 
hams are avid bowlers, and Mr. 
Newsham expresses a desire to 
try out for the faculty basketball 
team. 

No Skiing ... Yet 

In addition, he enjoys surf 
fishing — while visiting his 
wife's parents on Cape Cod — 
and ice skating. "But, so far, not 
skiing — not after seeing Mr. 
Walsh limping around campus 
since I came here," he joked. 
Also an amateur cabinet maker, 
Newsham built his own stereo, 
and plans to build a cabinet for 



! 
f 



Lantern Room 
Bert's Drive-in 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 



9* 



Ritz Theatre 

Thurs., Fri., Sat., 
Nov. 7, 8, 9 

"TWICE 

TOLD 
TALES" 

- with - 
VINCENT PRICE 

(Technicolor) 

"MARY HAD 
A LITTLE" 

— Closed Wednesdays — 



abroad for further study in 
Paris at the Bibliotheque Na- 
tionale. Germany and Holland 
also caught his interest. Upon 
returning to the states, he 
taught at the University of Ore- 
gon for three years. 

A bachelor, Havers was free to 
return to Paris a second time 
for more research. While in Eu- 
rope this time, he also explored 
Belgium extensively. Currently 
he is working on his doctoral 
dissertation at Columbia. 

When asked to compare the 
University of Oregon and Bates, 
Havers observed in his Texas 
drawl, "The classes are smaller 
here and there is more personal 
contact between teacher and 
student. The students them- 
selves are not too much differ- 
ent, but I feel I can demand more 

at Bates because the students are 
more carefully selected. At 



Bates, you know, the students 
can produce what you ask, 
whereas at the University you 
had to test the students out." 

Havers has no criticism of 
Bates so far, and seems to like 
teaching here very much. "Of 
course, I have just arrived," he 
laughed. 

Besides his interest in the 
French language, he is an art 
collector and painter. He enjoys 
art, history, browsing through 
museums and collecting prints, 
drawings and woodcuts. Havers 
has a penchant for oriental art 
and Italian primitive painting. 
Someday soon he hopes to visit 
the Treat Gallery in Pettigrew 
Hall. 

While at Bates, Havers is 
teaching both introductory and 
intermediate French. He hopes 
to stay here indefinitely, but 
"that depends not so much on 
how I like the school, but on how 
well the school likes me." 



Shakespeare Visits U N of Poetry 



By JANET McEACHERN 

Sunday night in the depths of 
Pettigrew Hall a strong-willed 
shrew was again tamed as Pro- 
fessor John Tagliabue's Shakes- 
peare class, under the auspices 
of the United Nations of Poetry, 
presented The Taming of the 
Shrew. 

This presentation was just one 
of the activities of this informal 
group which gathers about every 
three weeks at the Tagliabue 
house. Here students who enjoy 
reading poetry to each other, 
sometimes their own, sometimes 

it in some future leisure time. 

The Newshams have two small 
children — a two and a half 
year old boy, and a girl who will 
have her first birthday within 
the next few weeks. 

"I'm working harder here 
than at Dupont," Mr. Newsham 
stated. "I have to work to keep 
up with the students — they ask 
'why?' to things I used to take 
for granted from my professors." 

Concerning his method of 
teaching, and especially in 
answer to certain complaints 
about the difficulty and length of 
his assigned problems, Mr. News- 
ham defended himself by say- 
ing, "I think the best way for 
people to learn, especially in 
sciences, is to work problems. 
You can probably learn more by 
grinding through a hard problem 
than you can in lecture — and I 
probably learn as much from 
them as my students do." 



THE 

"HOB B" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



modern or ancient poetry — from 
the United States and other 
countries — congregate for an 
evening of poetic appreciation. 

At the first meetings at his 
house this year some German 
poems were read: Martine Bur- 
din, freshman student from 
France, read some French 
pieces; Mr. Pei-chih Hsieh, Chi- 
nese History teacher, read some 
Li Po; and Professor Tagliabue 
read some of his own poems 
which were just published by 
New Deviations. 

Says Professor Tagliabue: "It's 
good to make a spiritual pastime 
or a festival of reading poems 
aloud; it's a liberal art to en- 
joy listening; so these meetings 
resound." 



Clinic 



(Continued from page one) 

graduates Clarence Quimby '10, 
with fifty years experience, 
whom Bates students recognize 
as the young fellow who MC'd 
this year's Homecoming Football 
Rally. (He's also Professor 
Brooks Quimby 's big brother.) 
Other honored coaches from 
Bates will be George Hutchin- 
son '21, Lawrence Bagley '26, 
Nellie Mae Lange '25, and Frank 
Cooper. 

All the distinguished guests 
will be presented to the audi- 
ence before the final panel dis- 
cussion which will begin at 7: 15 
in the auditorium of the Little 
Theater. 

At 8: 15 a Collegiate Debate on 
the High School Proposition, by 

Bates debaters Morris Lelyveld 
'64, Robert Boyd '64, Richard 
Rosenblatt '66, and Norman 
Bowie '64 will round out the 
day's debating activities. A brief 
critique on their debate by J. 
Weston Walsh will conclude this 
fiftieth anniversary program of 
the Bates League. 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



Editorials 

| The Commitment To Education 

A situation which is potentially one of the most important 
events in the history of the College has arisen within the last 
week. We are speaking of the faculty decision instituting 
compulsory attendance at the Academic Colloquium this 
month. 

The irony of this decision is frightening — not only be- 
cause compulsion in regard to learning is the very antithesis 
of a liberal education, but because there is the possibility 
that some — student and faculty alike — do not realize this 
paradox involved in the decision. 

We emphasize that we are not calling for a reversal of this 
decision, but for a reversal in the thinking (or non-thinking) 
which has made this decision necessary. This thinking — the 
reasons why and the causes which have led to the present 
situation — must be investigated. We must realize that the 
faculty decision is not in any way a solution to the problem 
as a whole (and only a poor solution to the practical prob- 
lem of getting an audience for the colloquia). 

The situation — the problem — is: Why do we find such 
a lack in the College of that very spirit which we are sup- 
posedly celebrating this year — namely, the "spirit of in- 
quiry"? What has caused the students of this college to view 
education in the narrow sense so many of them do — namely, 
as "grinding," or poring over textbooks for the "nuggets" of 
a course? Why does the studentry, as a whole, have so little 
appreciation for music, intellectual discussion, and the ideas 
of others as presented in speeches? 

Where have the faculty failed in challenging the students? 
Why hasn't the Core Program developed the "spirit of in- 
quiry" of which President Phillips spoke in his Convocation 
address? What is it about the Freshman courses that devel- 
ops a "nugget-oriented mind"? Why has the Chapel Assem- 
bly program failed to develop (and in fact stifled) an appre- 
ciation for hearing the ideas of others through speeches? 

The burden of responsibility, however, does not lie wholly 
upon the faculty. We have been speaking here of the stu- 
dents "as a whole" and "in general." It might be argued that 
most students really aren't interested in, or capable of deal- 
ing with, anything but "nuggets;" and perhaps this is true 
(though we hate to admit it). But why is it that a liberal arts 
college should have a majority of students who are uninter- 
ested in a liberal arts education? 

This calls into question administrative policies dealing 
with the admission of students, not to mention policies to- 
ward students who are already here. Why is so little respon- 
sibility delegated to students in areas of self-government? 
This cannot be answered by saying that they don't deserve 
it; for irresponsible students shouldn't be here in the first 
place. Furthermore, one duty of the College is to "develop 
character in the students;" and what does this mean if not 
to develop a sense of responsibility? 

So far we have spoken of causes within the faculty and 
administration which have resulted in the lack of commit- 
ment to a liberal arts education. What about causes within 
the studentry itself? Where have students failed? When 
have they failed to insist upon discussion of ideas in courses? 
When have they taken advantage of a "nugget-minded" pro- 
fessor as a chance to avoid real study and real learning? 
When have students refused to express their ideas and to 
take an interest in education? It is as much a responsibility 
of the student to make classes as it is to attend them. 

We have been told and we have said that it must be our 
purpose during this year to look forward to the next one- 
hundred years. We cannot simply look back. 

We have here outlined some problems which must be con- 
sidered, and some questions to guide our thinking. This 
thinking must take place. The necessity for requiring at- 
tendance at the Academic Colloquium should make both 
faculty and student participants in the college dialogue pause 
to reflect on the entire structure of their education. 

The faculty, however, is in a unique position — they are 
both students and teachers. The challenge — the leadership 
— we feel, must come from them. Too often in the past there 
has been an unwillingness on the part of the faculty to in- 
clude the studentry in their discussion. 

Not only must the dialogue occur among the studentry and 
among the faculty, but between these two groups also. Too 
many students have failed to develop a "spirit of inquiry" 
simply because faculty leadership in education has failed to 
show any sign of this spirit. 



SOUTH OF PARIS 




P. d'E. 



Hates & Stuamt 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 - Sports Editor 

Published weekly at Parker Hall. Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6681. Printed at Auburn Free Press. 96 Court Street Auburn. Maine. 



By PETER REICH '65 
In some of the contemporary 
European films such as Last Year 
At Marienbad, Eclipse, and the 
Fellini films, it seems as if the 
directors, more than the actors, 
are trying to convey not only a 
story, but also the very emotions 
felt by the characters. BVa is not 
just an account of the events in- 
volved in making the film, it is 
also an attempt by Fellini to re- 
late, symbolically, what he ex- 
perienced and how he experi- 
enced it. 

"Thus On One Level . . ." 

Thus on one level we have es- 
sentially events, and on another 
level an attempt to convey sym- 
bolically the relation and mean- 
ing of the events as they were 
perceived. It is a difficult idea 
and did not begin to make itself 
evident until I experienced some 
of these "2-level" events, which 
I will try to relate to you. I 
think it is interesting that the 
events which I described as 
characteristic of European films 
occurred to me in Europe, and 

not in the U.S.A. 

* * * 

"2-level" Events 

This afternoon was colourless 
and grey. I was in a small cafe 
drinking hot chocolate. Next to 
me a young man was doing a 
crossword puzzle with a green 
pen. It was quiet until a little 
girl knocked a glass onto the 
floor. It shattered, the mother 
said "O malheur". The silence, 
and the green pen continued 
while the little girl smiled inno- 
cently and vacantly. 

Next to the window a man sat 
with two glasses of beer. The 
beers sat on the table expectant- 
ly until a car outside drove 
onto the side walk and parked 
its two front wheels in the two 
beers. An old man who shook, 
opened the car door and started 



to get out, bumped his head, fin- 
ished getting out, and then stood 
emptily in the wind, shaking. 
Over his head, in an apartment 
building across the street, a wo- 
man shook out a carpet; and 
next to me the young man, who 
was shaking his head violently, 
put the green pen in his pocket, 
stood up, stepped over the brok- 
en glass and went outside into 
the wind. 

* * * 

The customs office in Grenoble 
is large and grey, with trucks in 
front of it. Inside, it looks empty 
even when there are trunks and 
suitcases, crates, and boxes 
stacked and strewn everywhere. 
Two little men in blue with 
berets were there, smoking 
Gauloise and pushing crate racks 
piled high with boxes back and 
forth from the musty room into 
the noisy sunshine. 

The customs office is in a small 
room just off the receiving room, 
with a small pane-glass door con- 
necting the two. The officer was 
inside the door with two Italian 
women, arguing loudly. But the 
door was closed and dirty: There 
was no colour here, only distant 
voices and hands waving, and I 
had the feeling that had the 
pane-glass door been opened, the 
voices would still have been as 
distant and far as they seemed 
with it closed. 

The sounds and movement 
were a reflection of something 
that was not happening. Sudden- 
ly two small boys appeared in 
the glass. They had grinning 
faces and their small smudged 
and silent fingers explored the 
glass while they looked and 
made faces at me. One of the 
boys, the smaller, found a hole 
in one of the windows, and 
putting his lips to it, shouted a 
light song quickly out of the of- 
fice and into the receiving room. 



From The Loser's Corner 

By BRADFORD F. ANDERSON '66 
Most election results are readily predictable, and the Sen- 
atorial returns of two weeks ago were no exception. After a 
rather ineffectual primary coupled with an apparently abor- 
tive attempt at campaigning, defeat and I met again like old 
friends. * 



Several things developed dur- 
ing the campaign that deserve 
recounting. Particularly striking 
was the indifference to our new 
form of government. Now I 
realize that reaction (or rather 
the lack of it) is not novel for 
our campus; but it was partic- 
ularly discouraging to find that 
not many voters realized the po- 
tential benefits resulting from 
campus unification. 

Somehow it has escaped no- 
tice that our chances for change 
have just about doubled. We 
have had to wait one-hundred 
years to observe co-educational 
representation, which is not too 
long to consider all the complex 
implications. 

Now that we seem able to han- 
dle integrated relationships, just 
what can we honestly accom- 
plish? It would be too much to 
expect any satisfactory adoption 
of one Sophomore idealist's pro- 
gram; re: Anderson's "Platform 
for Liberal Collegiate Policies" 
(a product obviously born in 
moments of rare exaltation). 
There are, however, many things 



that the Senators can do to re- 
move the restrictive yoke of ad- 
ministrative direction. They are 
outwardly minor things that be- 
long in the realm of political 
infighting but have a tremendous 
influence on the trends of pol- 
icy. One thing is certain: if this 

Congress does not display un- 
usual motivation and resource- 
fulness in pursuit of a healthier 
college society at the beginning, 
it is going to be very hard for 
any succeeding Congress to gain 
momentum. 

A continuous history of disap- 
pointments has seemed to make 
Bales College a community of 
fatalists. This type of philosophy 
may have some seed of realism 
in it, but not enough to be any- 
more than the easy way out. 
Bearing in mind that there are 
two likely methods of change, 
determinism might be a more 
suitable system of thought. We 
can succeed by obliterating all of 
our obstacles, or by building a 
strong government that will take 
the lead by the power of its 
presence. 



Christmas Cards 
From UNICEF 
Benefit Children 

By JANET McEACHERN '66 

Project yourself into the fu- 
ture about two months, and you 
arrive at Christmas — a relig- 
ious, and now social, celebra- 
tion of giving — a joyous occa- 
sion of jolly Santa Clauses and 
mounds of toys. 

The United Nations Children's 
Fund is a somewhat more seri- 
ous-minded Santa to the children 
of 116 different countries and 
territories each year. Founded 
by the UN General Assembly in 
1946, UNICEF is the official UN 
organization concerned with pro- 
viding the basic essentials of life 
to more than 659 million under- 
privileged children of every race, 
religion, and political belief in 
every part of the world. 

UNICEF, although an integral 
part of the United Nations, must 
derive its income through vol- 
untary contributions from indiv- 
iduals, governments, and certain 
fund raising activities. The an- 
nual sale of UNICEF greeting 
cards is one of these functions. 

Famous artists throughout the 
world, such as Ruben Friedwall, 
Edward Ardizzone, Henry Moore, 
and Arnold Blanch, contribute 
designs for the cards, whose pro- 
ceeds are quickly put into use by 
UNICEF. 

UNICEF cards are a double act 
of giving, benefiting not only the 
person who opens the mailbox 
but children throughout the 
world. The purchase of ten boxes 
of cards will supply 400 children 
with a glass of milk every day 
for a full week; or will buy 
enough penicillin to cure 100 
children of the yaws; or will 
provide an intensive three-year 
treatment for four children suf- 
fering from leprosy; or will pur- 
chase enough DDT to protect 35 
children against malaria for a 
year. 

Information concerning UNICEF 
greeting cards may be obtained 
from: U. S. Committee for 
UNICEF Greeting Cards. P.O. 
Box 22, Church Street Station. 
New York 8. N. Y. 



POTTERY CLASSES 
Pottery Classes at the Jew- 
ish Community Center. 134 
College Street, will be held 
Friday afternoons from 1:30 
to 3:30. The fee is $6.00 for 
ten two-hour lessons (mater- 
ial included). The first class 
was held on Friday, Novem- 
ber 1. All those interested 
are invited to come. 



FILM CRITIC 
During the past few weeks, 
Sam Withers '65 has been 
writing movie reviews for 
the STUDENT. 

He is now film critic for 
the paper, and will be re- 
viewing each Rob Players' 
movie, as well as significant 
films at Lewiston theatres. 
Editor. 



CHESS CLUB 
Each Wednesday evening, 
the Lewiston-Auburn Chess 
Club meets at 7:30 in the 
Municipal building in Au- 
burn. 

Anyone interested in play- 
ing chess is invited. Players 
of varying ability are asked 
to attend and to bring chess 
sets with them. 

For further information 
see Mr. Nelson in Pettigrew 



< » » 



* » 



i 



i 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



FIVE 



Gals Revel In Patchy Dance 
As Sadie Rides Again 



By SUE LORD '66 
Down in Dogpatch Saturday 
night the annual Sadie Hawkins 
Dance reeled in the Alumni 
Gym. Hundreds of women and 
their captives lined the front 
walk, waiting for their men's 
waists to be measured. After the 
measurements were taken, the 
women paid three cents an inch 
for the entrance fee. 
Girls Amazed 

Once in the door, the couples 
joined the madding crowd. How- 
ie Davidson played the hillbilly 
music and much to the amaze- 
ment of the girls, the Bates guys 
actually square danced, twisted 
and did the "Hora." The roar of 
gleeful laughter, excited stomp- 
ing, and wild applause lent a 
raucous air to the proceedings. 

Dogpatch costumes, quite in- 
geniously contrived, were the 
rule. One well known couple 
even split a pair of pajamas. 
(She wore the top; he wore the 
bottom.) "Official Falsie Inspec- 
tor" Davis was also there to rep- 
resent the American Dental As- 
sociation. 

Hillbilly Posters 

"Colorful" posters designed by 
the girls' dorms adorned the 
walls of the gym in real hillbilly 
style. "Wolf Gal," "Marryin' 
Sam," and other characters from 
"L'il Abner" were portrayed in 
water colors by the girls. 

Milliken House won first prize 
in the poster contest with an en- 
try of Lucy (of "Peanuts" 
fame) carrying Pappy Yokum 
over her shoulder. The caption: 



"Get 'em while they're hot." And 
get 'em they did, Marryin' Sam 
reports. Walt Slovenski in the 
form of Marryin' Sam gave 
couples the opportunity to "git 
hitched" with an official Bates 
"blue slip". Credit must also be 
given to the women for display- 
ing their creative artistry in the 
form of "corsages". Quite an ar- 
ray of concoctions were pinned 
to many a man's shoulder. 

A welcome break in the eve- 
ning was the entertainment pre- 
sented by the Merrimanders, John 
Meyn '64 and Dick Crocker '66. 
The Merris did their own inter- 
pretations of "Peter Piper," "It 
Might as Well be Spring," and 
the "Fight Song." This year as 
an added attraction, WRJR an- 



nounced the winner of the 
AM/FM "wireless" which was 
offered in connection with its 
fund drive. Dick Andren '64 was 
the lucky recipient. Genuine 
Dogpatch refreshments of cider 
and donuts were served, after 
being raided prematurely by one 
group of starving guys and 
gals. 

Yes, the campus does go wild 
at least one night out of the 
year. All pretenses of sophistica- 
tion, inhibition and formality 
were lost in the frolic of Sadie 
Hawkins Day. Co - education's 
joys were indeed enjoyed. 

So, gals, put away your bear 
traps and handcuffs and let the 
guys take over! "And no two 
ways about that either." 



Wesson: Author - Scholar 
Returns For Second Time 



By LINDA MITCHELL '66 

After spending a year at St. 
Anthony's College, which spec- 



Horn And The Hounds 



By WILLIAM HISS '66 

Scene 1. 

The end of a long corridor in a 
brightly lighted but dingy build- 
ing. A group of the hollow men 
sit motionless and staring on the 
floor around the phone booth. 
They seem to wait for it to ring. 
A bell tolls out in the distance. 
Immediately the phone rings. 
The leader of the hollow men 
answers. The giddy, babbling 
voice of Sadie: 

Sadie. Hiya there, Sadie callin'. 
You got some men there? 

Leader. Yea. What number you 
got? 

S. 68. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




i Ler* Pima ume earuek next time.' i me this rfxm 




L. Close, but no cigar. 

S. What? 

L. Never mind. 

Enter housemother on winged 
monster. Exit hollow men. 
Scene 2. 

A cavernous dimly lighted hall, 
reeking with the stench of years 
of unwashed bodies. The hall is 
festooned with gaity. Gaity is 
29c a roll at Woolworth's. The 
air throbs with joyous strains. 
The joyous strains are $150 a 
night, with half hour breaks. 
Last year the joyous strains 
were very brassy. I hope the 
same joyous strains are not here 
this year. 

Anything for Money 

Enter Sadie, disguised as a pig. 
Enter hollow man. He is not hol- 
low. In fact, he has a full tank. 
He is feeling no pain. He thinks 
Sadie is very beautiful. Actually 
Sadie is not beautiful. Sadie is 
very ugly. The hollow man has 
won the pot. He has $5.30 in 
dimes. 

He thinks that Sadie must be 




Dr. Robert G. Wesson 



a wonderful girl if she can win 
him $5.30. That is 53 cups of den 
coffee. Sadie is also number 68. 
That is close enough. That is an- 
other $5.30. The hollow man is 
very, very happy. He tries to kiss 
Sadie. Enter Zeus in a Volkswa- 
gon. Enter Pallas Athene in a 
Pontiac. Pallas Athene disap- 
proves of the hollow man. She 
complains to Zeus. Zap. Fric- 
asseed hollow man down the 
road — down the road . . . 



□ 

Patronize 
Our 
Advertisers 

□ 



ializes in international relations 
and is one of the colleges of Ox- 
ford University, Dr. Robert G. 
Wesson has returned to Bates 
for the second time in three 
years as a visiting professor of 
government. He is currently 
taking the place of Dr. Wright as 
he did in 1961-1962. 

Wesson has had a variety of 
intellectual and business experi- 
ences since his graduation from 
the University of Arizona in 
1940 and the Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy from which 
he received his master's degree 
in 1941. First, he joined the 
United States Foreign Service 
for three years, serving as Vice- 
Consul in Venezuela and Col- 
ombia consecutively. Following 
this, he joined the Navy for two 
years. 

Import Business 

After a year at the Russian 
Institute of Columbia University 
and a year of traveling in Eu- 
rope, Wesson went to Costa Rica 
and obtained an import business. 
As a source of relaxation on 
weekend97*"he ran a dairy farm 
which was located on the side of 
a volcano. Due to the political 
situation, he left Costa Rica. 

In 1956, Wesson began teach- 
ing with the U. S. Information 
Service. After receiving his doc- 
torate in Political Science from 
Columbia in 1961, he came to 
Bates for a year. 

In addition to these ventures, 
Wesson has written two books. 
The first book, entitled Soviet 
Communes, has already been 
published. It is a study of the ex- 
periment made in the Soviet 
Union before a limited form of 
collective farming was decided 
upon. His second book, which is 
in the process of being published, 
is entitled, The American Prob- 
lem, and deals with the basic 
problems of the cold war. 



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SIX 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



McKusick BreaksRecords; 
Dalers Continue To Win 



By AL HARVIE '65 

Coach Walt Slovenski's cross- 
country team continued its fero- 
cious winning pace by extending 
its record to eight wins against 
only one loss, with that to the 
Yankee Conference Champs, the 
U. of Maine. They defeated 
B o w d o i n College Saturday 
morning 16-46. On Friday after- 
noon at the Franklin Park 
course in Boston, both varsity 
and freshman teams were en- 
tered in the E.C.A.C. meet. 

Providence College swept the 
varsity meet with a score of 20 
points, but two runners from 
Central Connecticut, Ray Croth- 
ers, and two-time defending 
champ Jim Keefe, placed first 
and second respectively with 
Crothers' time of 20 mins. 33 
sees, establishing a new E.C.A.C. 
record. Central Conn, was sec- 
ond with 49 points, followed by 
M.I.T. with 47, Bates 77, and 
Trinity 135. 

Varsity finishers for Bates 
were Finn Wilhelmsen in sev- 
enth spot, nosing out Capt. Eric 
Silverberg in eighth position, 
Ken Trufant 14th, Basil Rich 
ardson 17th, and Marsh Snow 
31st. Incidentally, finishing third 
in the meet was M.I.T.'s fine 
runner, Sumner Brown, who last 
week edged out Bates' Karl Mc- 
Kusick by only three seconds. 

Garnet E -racer 

While the record books were 
being rewritten by the varsity 
runners, a few more were writ 
ten by Bates' phenomenal fresh 
man Karl McKusick. Karl turned 
in the fastest time ever by a 
yearling cross-country runner 
over the Franklin Park course. 
Not only did he establish a new 
course record, but also a new 
E.C.A.C. mark, and as if this 
weren't enough, it is also a new 
New England record. The pre- 
vious fastest time was set last 
year by Dave Dunsky of North- 
eastern, whose time of 13 mins. 
24 sees, was bettered by two sec- 
onds by McKusick. 

The Bobkittens, led by Mc- 
Kusick, finished third by Provi- 
dence College and Central Conn- 



SAM'S 
Esso Servicenter 

534 Main Si. Lewiston, Me. 

To All Bales Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment, 
Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 
Service 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 




73 Lisbon St. 



Lewiston 



ecticut. Scoring for the fresh- 
man team were: McKusick 1st, 
Paul Swensen 11th, Kim Kreut- 
zig 13th, Bruce Lyman 19th, 
and John Baldwin 23rd. 
Soaky Sweep 

On Saturday morning at Bow- 
doin, McKusick returned to the 
varsity to lead the Garnet over 
the rain-soaked course, beating 
the then existing course record 
by twenty-five seconds. Capt. 
Eric Silverberg finished second 
and also beat the old record. 
Finn Wilhelmsen finished only 
two sees, over the record in 
third place with Ken Trufant 
right behind him in fourth 
place. Bert Babcock ruined a 
perfect sweep for Bates by fin- 
ishing fifth for Bowdoin. Paul 
Swensen finished sixth with 
Basil Richardson seventh, Don 
Cellar ninth, and Marsh Snow 
tenth. 

Come One Come All 

This week the cross-country 
team closes out its season with 
a home meet against St. Anselm 
College Friday afternoon at 2 
p.m. This will be the last cross- 
country meet for Capt. Eric Sil- 
verberg and senior classmate 
Finn Wilhelmsen. For those of 
you who haven't seen these two 
run, along wjth frosh sensation 
Karl McKusick, and sophomore 
Ken Trufant, it is indeed a rare 
treat to see them perform. The 
best spot for viewing the meet is 
inside the Bates Student en- 
trance to Garcelon field. 



STATE SOCCER 
STANDINGS 





W L T 


Colby 


2 0 1 


Bates 


3 1 1 


Bowdoin 


1 1 2 


Maine 


0 4 0 


STATE 


FOOTBALL 


STANDINGS 




W L 


Maine 


2 0 


Bowdoin 


2 0 


Bates 


0 2 


Colby 


0 2 



Bobcats Close Season Saturday 
With Evenly Matched Mules 



TRACK CANDIDATES 
There will be a brief but 
important meeting of all 
winter track candidates in 
the cage today at 5 p. m. 
Anyone who is unable to at- 
tend is asked to speak 
with Coach Slovenski prior 
to the meeting. 



By KEITH BOWDEN '64 

This Saturday the Bates Bob- 
cat varsity football squad trav- 
els to Waterville for their final 
encounter of the season. The op- 
position Colby Mules will be 
looking to maintain the suprem- 
acy they have enjoyed over Bates 
in the past several years, while 
the Bobcats will be looking to 
reverse this trend. 

It's Been Too Long 

Bates has not beaten Colby 
since 1956. The senior class of 
1964 has yet to see Bates prevail 
over Colby in football, so a win 
in Waterville would be highly 
rewarding. Last year, a winless 
Colby team stunned Bates 16-12 
in a rain-soaked game at Garce- 
lon field. 

The game appears to be a toss- 
up on paper. Colby has a 2-5 
record, while the 'Cats are 2-4. 
The Mules, like the Bobcats, 
have seen a first half lead over 
Bowdoin evaporate as they 
came out on the short end of a 
22-14 verdict. 

Last week, Colby also felt the 
sting of mighty Maine before a 
homecoming crowd, as they were 
crushed 55-12. This game will 
produce an added incentive for 
both teams. The winner will 
escape occupying the cellar in 
the final state series standings. 

Key Men 

Key players to watch for 
Colby will be quarterback John 
Robbat and end Bruce Wald- 
man, the favorite target of Rob- 
bat's aerials. Jim Lambert will 
provide much of the running 
punch as his 98 yard kickoff re- 
turn against Maine testifies. 

Another Colby face who 



should be familiar to most Bob- 
cat rooters will be that of Vern 
Ullom, last year's line coach at 
Bates and now occupying the 
same position at Colby. 
Last Go 

Seniors who will be playing 
their last game for Bates include 



Capt. Paul Planchon, John 
1 Schatz, Ron Stead, John Dono- 
van, Bill Graham, Dave Piasecki 
and Dave and Dan Stockwell. 
Another large contingent of 
Bates rooters, such as the one at 
Bowdoin. would be appreciated 
by all the players. 



41 




MacNevin's pass try to Yuskis barely misses TD 



Cheerleader 



Another perky cheerleader 
helping the squad cheer the 
Bobcats onward is Florence Wat- 
son, better known as Terri. A 
member of the squad for two 
years, Terri admits that she is 
very impressed with the new 
cheers of this year. 

Coming from the fair city of 
Wethersfield, Conn., she is able 
to do much horseback riding for 
she is fortunate to have the near- 
by Thurston stables available 



where she can further her fav- 
orite pastime. As an excellent 



W. A. A. News 



By MARCIA FLYNN '65 

At this point many may feel 
that the girls' field hockey team 
is this year a nonentity. I wish 
to refute this sentiment and re- 
port that potential is high this 
year for a good team to repre- 
sent us at the playday, November 
16th. Unfortunately, the wea- 
ther of last week hindered some 
good practice time. Moreover, 
a game had been planned for 
last Wednesday with Plymouth 
State which had to be cancelled 
because of our first snow! 



Provencher Hill 
FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS 

Tel. 784-5563 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
Dial 784-8165 Nights 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
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TURCOTTE'S 
GARAGE 

Lewiston's Only Radio Dispatch 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabattus St. Lewiston 



BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE at 

ADVANCE AUTO SALES, INC. 

24 FRANKLIN STREET AUBURN. MAINE 

Dial 784-5775 or 782-2686 

VALIANT-PLYMOUTH CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL 
5 -Year and 50,000 Mile Guarantee 

- GUARANTEED USED CARS — 
Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates- Affiliated People 



New Blood 

Those out for the team are: 
Cindy Bagster-Collins, Penny 
Brown, Martha Buzzell, Pris 
Clark, Dale Cooperson, Judy 
Deitz, Ingrid Earn, Marcia 
Flynn, Liz Frangedakis, Holly 
Hagedorn, Betsy Hormex, Trish 
Hayes, Judy Johnson, Joyce 
Kate, Sue Maryalma, Jane Mc- 
Grath, Karin Mueller, Kathy 
Pease, Sue Pritcher, Bonnie Pop- 
ek, Carol Renard, Sara Schenk, 
Cathy Southall, Hildy Spooner, 
Carol Sue Steeleman, Betsey 
Tarr, Carolyn Thomas, Gail 
Tupper, Judy Lulin, Barb Wil- 
liams, Jay Uells, Sue Frances, 
Debby Bartlett, Chris Falk, Pen- 
ny Barbour, Janet Grossman, 
Sue Stanley, and Barb Remick. 

There has been no first team 
picked from this group since 
Coach Miss Janet Nell has not a 
sufficient chance to view all 
candidates. However, it is ex- 
pected that the traveling eleven 
will be announced within the 
next two weeks. 




(Talbot Photo) 



rider, Terri spends many long 
hours jauntily sitting and train- 
ing the horses at the stables. 

A junior here at Bates, Miss 
Watson is kept very busy with 
her studies, but still finds time to 
be an active member in both the 
French and Riding Clubs. At the 
present time, Terri is a French 
major but has no definite plans 
for the future (I bet Pete Peter- 
son might fall into some plan, 
though). In any event, Terri, 
keep up the good work! 

WARD'S TV Inc. 
COLOR and BLACK and WHITE 



Complete Line of 
Transistor Radios and Stereos 



288 Lisbon St., Lew. 



782-3711 



SMITTY'S 

Barber Shop 

274 Sabattus St. Lewiston 
Tel. 782-9010 
Specializing in 
FLAT TOPS 
ALWAYS TWO BARBERS 

Open - Mon.-Sat.» 8-5 

Closed Wednesday 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



4 9 
SEVEN 



Bobcat Of The Week 




It is very unique for a fresh- 
man to receive Bobcat of the 
Week honors, and it is even more 
unique for him to receive it 
twice. This week frosh cross- 
country standout Karl McKusick 




Colby Edges Booters Out Of First Place; 
Tie Bowdoin, 2-2, In Rain Soaked Game 

By AL WILLIAMS '64 

The Bates soccer team's five game winning streak came to a close last Thursday when 
the always strong Colby mule beat the Bobcats 2-1 in a game not lacking excitement. On 
Saturday, under the worst conditions possible, the Bowdoin Polar Bear and the Bates team 
fought (or rather swam) to a 2-2 deadlock. 
Deadlock Broken 

The Colby Mule, led by a 
great goalie, moved into the first 
spot in the State Series with 
their tight win over the Garnet. 
The Mule broke into the scoring 
column late in the second quar- 
ter after a pretty even first quar- 
ter. The garnet five came back 
after halftime with a determina- 
tion to even the score. A beauti- 
ful pass from captain Lloyd Bun- 



ten gave center forward Bob 
Lanz . a goal on a head ball in 
front of the Colby nets to make 
the score 1 up. Both teams 
missed numerous scoring oppor- 
tunities in' the final quarter. 

With less than five minutes re- 
maining in the game, a Colby 
lineman booted home a tally out 
of a mix-up in front of the Bates 
goal, and the fate of the Bobcat 
was sealed. The game ended on 
a typical note when the Colby 



Utromrr '$ lantrr 



(Farrington Photo) 



has been awarded the honor for 
the second time this fall. 

In winning the E.C.A.C. cham- 
pionship meet Friday, the per- 
sonable youth established new 
Franklin Park course, E.C.A.C. 
frosh, and New England frosh 
records. The never unwinding 
McKusick bounced right back 
Saturday morning, running in 
the rain to establish a new Bow- 
doin course record. Running at 
Bowdoin, Karl was signalled the 
wrong way, returned to the 
course, and still beat the exist- 
ing record by 25 seconds. 

In competing against nine col- 
leges thus far this fall, Karl 
has beaten sixty-two competi- 
tors, excluding his teammates, 
and has been beaten only by 
Sumner Brown of M.I.T. by 
three seconds. 

Karl climaxed his first season 
for the Garnet and White by be- 
coming the Eastern Collegiate 
Athletic Conference Freshman 
Cross-Country Champion and set 
himself up as a strong prospect 
in the I.C.4 A's. in New York, 
November 18. 



Louis P. Nolin 




By DON BLUMENTHAL '64 
While the "Kinger" is taking 
his short, but much needed va- 
cation, I will attempt to weave 
my way into the realm of the 
creative, artistic (that's close) 
I sports writing field and bring 
| you up to date on the intramural 
scene. 

It is unfortunate that snow, 
rain, and forfeits altered this 
week's action. However, our be- 
loved, inane Maine afforded us 
a few days of sunshine. 

A Foggy Day 

It was another dismal day for 
the Play bunnies. (And bunnies 
they were as they danced 
around looking for each other's 
tail to play with.) It seems that 
Mistah Bekoff and company 
were more interested in playing 
doll house than in playing a fair 
championship J.B. team. 

The Playthings, as they are 
now known, got off to their 
usual start as J.B.'s Ron Vance 
uncorked a nifty 30 yd. T.D. 
aerial to the long outstretched 
hands of Ian Pravda. At this 
point I must conjecture that 
Y.A. (he still has that name?) 
Wallach looked awfully funny 
leaping into the thin air and 
getting nothing but a few off 
color comments. 

Frustrated Strategy 

The Playboys were not to be 
denied however, as they began 
their new found strategy. Not 
calling plays in the huddle 
proved to be successful as the 
rattled Bloop (that's me) 
launched two wobblers to suave 
Harv. Al reciprocated by firing 
three bombs to yours truly. The 
Playboys missile program was 
short - lived as Jeff H i 1 1 i e r 
plucked in a misguided bomb of 
Don King and roared into the 



Corner Ash and Lisbon Sis. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



pay station for another six point 
tally. Darkness soon prevailed, 
and the votes were tallied with 
J.B. wrapping up their second 
consecutive championship, 12-0. 

In B League action a vicious 
wall (or should I say Hall) from 
North stopped the boys from J.B. 
The Smith North villains came 
right back to uproot the Play- 
juniors 14-2. W. Parker and S. 
South C won by forfeits. 

Sorry, No Horses 

Because the expert is on vaca- 
tion this week (as he is every 
week) there won't be any 
horses to watch. 

Sadie Hawkins was as lovely 
as ever even though Sliver 
thought differently about the 
whole situation. 

Finally, if it doesn't snow, 
there will be a second place bat- 
tle this afternoon between the 
A teams of Roger Bill and West. 

Standings 
A League 
W L 

4 
1 
1 

. 1 
0 

B League 
W L 

3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

C League 



JB 

WP 

RB 

OC 

EP 



SM 

SN 

RB 

SS 

OC 

JB 



0 
1 
1 
2 
3 



0 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 



T 

0 
1 
1 
1 
1 





W 


L 


JB 


3 


1 


WP 


2 


1 


SM 


2 


1 


SN 


2 


2 


SS 


1 


1 


EP 


0 


4 



On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
side Auburn, Half Mile from 
Turnpike Exit No. 12 . . Phone 
783-1488 . . . Room Phone 

STARDUST MOTEL 

Exclusive But Not Expensive 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments* 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Marl 



goalie caught Bob Lanz's boot in 
the Colby goal area. The alert 
Colby net-tender was credited 
with 28 saves compared to eight 
for the Bates goalie. 

Center halfback George Beebe 
was outstanding both in ability 
and hustle in the Garnet second- 
ary. Bespectacled "Beebs" re- 
fused to give up on any ball in 
the first half and was all over 
the field. Fullbacks Bob Thomp- 
son and Todd Lloyd, except for 
two momentary lapses, played 
almost flawlessly defensively. 
Sophomore Mike Hine definitely 
played his best game of the sea- 
son at halfback. Alert Bob 
Kramer saved a goal late in the 
third quarter. 

Musical Chairs 

In the game at Bowdoin, the 
first quarter belonged to the 
Bowdies, the second to the 
Bobcats, the third to Bowdoin 
and the fourth to the rain. The 
Polar Bear erected a 1-0 lead in 
the first quarter. Steve Barron 
tied the score on a kick in front 
of the goal. The wet ground and 
puddles make kicking excep- 
tionally difficult. On this goal 
Bob Lanz and Dan Hagglund 
also added their impetus to the 
ball. Bruce Petersen's first goal 
of the season on a rebound shot 
gave the garnet a 2-1 lead at half 
time. The Bowdoin eleven came 
back strong after the half to tie 
the score on a beautiful head 
goal. Then the rains descended 
and the soccer game became 
more of a water polo match. 

Bates's chances of winning the 
state series championship have 
dimmed considerably after last 
week's play, but a win at Colby 
would still assure the booters of 
at least a tie depending on the 
outcome of the Colby-Bowdoin 
game. The last home game of 
the season will be November 6 
against Clark. 



Tickets For 
Colby Game 

Away Games: 

Nov. 2 — 1:30 p. m. at Bowdoin 
Nov. 9 — 1 : 30 p. m. at Colby 
Ticket Sale — At the Bates Ath- 
letic Office beginning on the 
Monday prior to the game and 
ending at noon on Friday. 
Bales Students: Upon presen- 
tation of "ID" cards, students 
may purchase student tickets 
for $1.00. The $1.00 student 
ticket cannot be purchased on 
the day of the game anywhere. 
Student Guests: Tickets for 
guests, to be seated with stu- 
dents, may be purchased for 
$2.50 at the Bales Athletic 
Office only. They cannot be 
purchased anywhere on the 
day of the game. 
All Others: This is an all-re- 
served seat game. The price of 
admission is $2.50. Tickets can 
be purchased at the site of the 
game. 

Admission: 
Bales Students: Students hold- 
ing the $1.00 student tickets 
will be admitted only at the 
Visiitng Student Entrances at 
Bowdoin and Colby Colleges.. 
Students will be asked to 
show their Bales Identification 
Cards when they present their 
admission tickets at the host 
colleges. 

Studenl Guesls and Others: 

Enter any gate. 

Important 

Ticket reservations may be 
made by telephone, but must be 
picked up by noon on the Friday 
before the game. Tickets cannot 
be reserved by telephone after 
this time. 

Refunds cannot be made on 
tickets after noon on the Friday 
before the game. 

For additional information tel- 
ephone Bates Athletic Office, 
2-6221. 




VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 

Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



DeWITT 
HOTEL 

Nearest the College 

$1.00 Luncheon and Dinner 
Specials - 7 Days a Week 

DINING COCKTAIL 
ROOM LOUNGE 
TeL 784-5491 



Too many hands foil Interception (Kahrl Photo) 



Complete FLORIST Service 

DUBE'S 
Flower Shop, Inc. 

Roger and Regina LaBrecque 
195 Lisbon Street Dial 784-4587 Lewiston 

— FLOWERS WIRED WORLD WIDE — 



■ 



so 

EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 6, 1963 



Brash Bowdies Squeak By Cats, 14-7 

Penalty Calls Set Up Key Score 
In Closing Minutes Of Contest 

By DON DELMORE '64 
The Bobcats suffered a heartbreaking 14-7 defeat at the hands of Bowdoin in Brunswick 
last Saturday at rain-soaked Whittier Field. A fired-up Bates squad crying "Remember the 
Lollypops" held the lead for all but the final 2:56 of the game. At this point the Polar Bears 
tallied after a very questionable pass interference call by a field judge approximately 
twenty yards from the play. 

'Cats Claw Early * 




. With NICK BASBANES 

After witnessing last Saturday's game between our 'Cats 
and the Polar Bears of Bowdoin, I couldn't help leaving the 
field filled with mixed emotions. The foremost of these was 
of course depression over the fact that we weren't the victors. 
Another was revulsion, and that due to the deplorable atti- 
tude displayed by the Bowdoin loyalists. I'm not referring to 
the Bowdoin team now, for they are a fine unit who should be 
proud of their achievements. But instead, I am taking notice 
of that representative group of "students" who provided the 
halftime "entertainment." The festivities so meticulously 
prepared were not so much amusing as they were revealing. 
For through the entire farce these Bowdies proved them- 
selves to be in possession of a decadent sense of humor. 

Actually, the whole series of events started last week when 
members of our team received lollypops in the mail from 
Bowdoin. Now even though this is a senseless move, for all 
it could possibly do was to get our men more "up", I must 
admit that it was pretty funny. But the humor was taken 
out of it when at the game these polar bears decided to make 
a sordid spectacle of themselves by using the prank of their 
lollypops as the basis for their mirth. 

Now ordinarily I wouldn't take exception to point out 
such a lack in character. However, this isn't the first time 
that it has been in evidence. For if many of you will recall, 
last basketball season the same type of humor was displayed 
when we played Bowdoin here. It was observed then by my 
former colleague that the Bowdies' actions had their founda- 
tions stemming from "deep within the bowels of the earth." 
Perhaps I can borrow this observation and apply it to last 
Saturday. In conclusion, I will say that Bowdoin should pride 
themselves with their win: For the irony of the whole mess 
shows that even though they were the on-paper winners, in 
the eyes of all the spectators, they were the biggest losers. 

With regard to the game itself, the constant rain made for 
a messy contest on the field. And equally as sloppy as the 
turf was the officiating. I do realize that the inclement con- 
ditions made it somewhat difficult to observe the game as 
closely as normal conditions would provide. However, some 
of the calls were obviously made in poor judgment. I am 
referring specifically here to that interference call made late 
in the fourth quarter which set up Bowdoin's winning touch- 
down. Two of our secondary men and one Bowdoin receiver 
were pursuing the ball in the end zone. The pass was thrown 
and knocked down, quite legally, by a Bates man. The of- 
ficial closest to the play called it, as we in the stands had 
called it, an incompleted pass. But another official, estimated 
to be from twenty to thirty-five yards away from the play, 
called interference. This crucial call gave Bowdoin the ball 
with first down on the Bates one yard line instead of fourth 
down and six on the fifteen. The anticlimatic and deciding 
touchdown came one play later. Now I'm not being a sore 
sport and saying that we shouldn't have lost the game. All 
I'm saying is that I would have felt better about its result if 
Bowdoin had made the touchdown from the fifteen instead of 
from the one. 

Stale Series action ends this Saturday with two important 
battles on the docket. Bowdoin and Maine will meet at Orono 
to decide who is the state's best (though there isn't really 
any doubt). Both are in possession of series records of two 
wins and no losses. The less noteworthy but equally import- 
ant tilt is at Waterville. It is crucial due to the possible re- 
sults involved: The loser winds up in the cellar with no wins 
and three losses, while the winner manages to salvage off a 
piece of state prestige. 



Bates elected to receive the 
kickoff and 1:21 later the visi- 
tors had a 7-0 lead. Big Tom Carr 
received the opening kick on his 
own twenty and smashed up the 
middle until finally brought 
down on the Bobcat forty-nine. 
On the second play from scrim- 
mage, Carr broke through the 
right side, cut to his left, and 
outran all Polar Bear defenders 
to paydirt. The brilliant touch- 
down run covered fifty-one 
yards. Freshman Bill Paris gave 
Bates a 7-0 lead with a place- 
ment conversion. 

The remainder of the first and 
the entire second quarter were 
played to a standoff. The Polar 
Bears threatened twice in the 
second period but both times 
the 'Cats successfully met their 
challenges. Another Bowdoin 
drive was halted on the Bates 
sixteen as time ran out in the 
first half. 
Bowdies Score 

Fullback Carr, playing equal- 
ly well on offense and on de- 
fense, recovered a Bowdoin 
fumble on the Polar Bear thirty- 
one following the second half 
kickoff. However, the 'Cats 
failed to move the ball and were 
forced to punt. Quarterback Bob 
Harrington, who amazed Bates 
and Bowdoin fans alike with his 
pinpoint passing and perfect 
execution of the option play, 
now directed another Polar Bear 
march downfield. The threat 
appeared to be stalled on the 
Bobcat eleven as halfback Jack 
Williams intercepted a Harring- 
ton aerial. But a Bates fumble 
was recovered by Bowdoin tac- 
kle Dave Andrew^ on the next 
play at the nine, and the stalled 
drive began again. 

On the third play from scrim- 
mage, Harrington rolled out and 
hit fullback Bill Farley in the 
end zone with a three yard flip 
to make the score 7-6. The same 
play was attempted for the two- 
point conversion but this time 
the pass fell incomplete. Bates 
still led 7-6 with :49 remaining 
in the third quarter. 

The determined Bobcats en- 
tered the fourth period with the 
objective of protecting their one 
point lead and preserving a hard 
fought victory. .With five min- 
utes remaining, however, Bow- 
doin began another drive, high- 
lighted by three first down com- 
pletions from Harrington to his 
left end Jim MacAllen. He then 



hit right end Frank Drigotas on 
the Bobcat five, but a clipping 
infraction by Bowdoin resulted 
in a fifteen yard penalty and set 
up a third down play on the 
Bates twenty. 

Harrington once again took to 
the air and lofted a pass to Bob 
Hooke in. the Bates end zone. 
Paul Planchon and John Yuskis 
were right on the play and 
blanketed the Polar Bear re- 
ceiver. The official nearest the 
play ruled it an incomplete pass, 
but the field judge ruled pass 
interference although he was at 
least twenty yards away and 



viewing the play at an extreme- 
ly difficult angle. The 'Cats pro- 
tested with little success and 
the "choke" call set up the 
winning touchdown. Harrington 
I dived from the one for the score 
and then passed to Hooke for the 
conversion to make the score 
14-7 with 2:56 remaining. 

Defeat was a tough pill to 
swallow after the 'Cats had out- 
scored the Polar Bears for all but 
the final two minutes. Statistics 
indicate the Bobcats were out- 
played, but whether they were 
legitimately outscored is still 
quite doubtful. 




MacNevin runs the option with Carr blocking (Kahrl Photo) 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, Nov. 6 
Soccer here with Clark 



Friday, Nov. 8 
Cross Country 
Anselm's 



here with St. 



Saturday. Nov. 9 

♦Football at Colby 

* Soccer at Colby 
Monday, Nov. 11 

Cross Country at New Eng- 
lands (Boston) 
♦State Series Competition 

1 



BEARS BEAR OUT 



First downs 

Rushing yardage .. 
Passing yardage .. 
Passes attempted 
Passes completed 
Passes intercepted 
Punts — yardage 

Fumbles 

Fumbles lost 

Penalties — yards 



Bowdoin 


Bates 


18 


3 


221 


136 


86 


21 


19 


11 


12 


2 


1 


1 


5-31 


7-37 


3 


2 


2 


1 


6-60 


8-103 



- - HAY RIDE PARTIES - - 



DANCING, TOO 



OLD SAND FARM 

DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 



First-Manufacturers 
National Bank 

of Lewiston and Auburn 

CONVENIENTLY 
LOCATED 

f or Bates Students at 
456 SABATTUS ST. 

Member F.D.I. C. 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. at Bates St. 

Tel. 783-2011 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

Phones in Rooms 
- Free TV - 

Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 
Auburn, Maine 
Dial 783-2044 



* 



« > 



1 ♦ 



« ft 



I 



*B a Us 




Vol. XC, No. 8 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



By Subscription 



World Renown Cellist 
Gives Concert Friday 

Community concert members have the opportunity to en- 
joy what promises to be a very rewarding performance. 
Leonard Rose, world renowned 'cellist, will be playing in 
the Lewiston High School Auditorium this Friday evening at 
8:15 p. m. 



If public acclamation is any 
indication of excellence, Mr. 
Rose is indeed a virtuoso. Bruno 
Walter, the famous conductor of 
the New York Philharmonic has 
said, "Leonard Rose's profound 
musicianship, technical perfec- 
tion, his emotional warmth and 
the rare beauty of his tone have 
been a joy to me in all the years 




Leonard Rose with his Amali 
Cello 

of our musical association. The 
cause of the 'cello's musical lit- 
erature can be in no better 
hands than his." 

The Community Concert pro- 
gram will center around Brahms' 
Sonata No. 2 in F Minor, Opus 
No. 2, and Tchaikovsky's Varia- 
tions on a Roccocco Theme, Opus 



No. 33. Also featured will be 
selections by Bach, Boccherini, 
and Chopin. 

Born in Washington, D. C, 
and brought up in Florida, Mr. 
Rose was a student of Felix 
Salmond at Philadelphia's Cur- 
tis Institute of Music. In 1938 he 
was engaged to play in Tosca- 
nini's NBC Symphony, and af- 
ter only three weeks was ap- 
pointed assistant first cellist by 
the Maestro. 

In 1944 he was appointed first 
cellist of the New York Phil- 
harmonic. Since leaving the 
Philharmonic in 1951, Mr. Rose 
has toured Europe, Israel, and 
America with great success. 

Of interest to those who have 
some knowledge oi instruments 
will be Mr. Rose's rare Amati 
'cello. Andrea Amati began his 
practice in Cremona in the six- 
teenth century and subsequent- 
ly passed his art down through 
the family. They have the dis- 
tinction of having given the re- 
nowned violin maker, Stradivai- 
rius his early training. 

Mr. Rose's 'cello dates from 
1622 and is known as being one 
of the finest of these Amati in- 
struments which are distin- 
guished for superb grace of out- 
line as well as beauty and pow- 
er of tone. 



Bates Honors Education 
Director, And Illustrator 

The conferring of two honor- 
ary degrees will be the high- 
light of the Bates Centennial 
Convocation next Wednesday. 
Approximately 110 faculty mem- 
bers, trustees, and representa- 
tives of various colleges and 
learned societies will take part 
in the processional which sig- 
nals the start of the convocation. 



The program includes brief 
remarks from the guest repre- 
sentatives, the actual awarding 
of the honorary degrees, and an 
address by Frank H. Bowles, Di- 
rector of the Ford Foundation 

Education Program. 

Frank H. Bowles and Philip 
Hofer will be the recipients of 
the two degrees. Frank H. 
Bowles is a graduate of Colum- 
bia University '28. He received 
his M.A. from there in 1930. He 
worked as an assistant of ad- 
missions at Columbia until 1937 
when he became Director of Ad- 
missions. He retained this post 
until 1948. 



After he left Columbia, he 
joined the College Entrance 
Examination Board. He resigned 
its presidency recently, a post 
he had assumed in 1957, to be- 
come director of the educational 
program for the Ford Founda- 
tion. 

Philip Hofer is a graduate of 
Harvard College. Returning to 
Harvard in 1958, he founded and 
became curator of the Depart- 
ment of Graphic Arts of the 
Harvard College Library. Mr. 
Hofer is noted for his arousing 
interest in the neglected area of 
book illustration. He has also 
acquired for Harvard over 1000 
books illustrated in the seven- 
teenth centry. Mr. Hofer is a 
trustee of many historical and 
art societies. 

Music for the Convocation will 
be provided by a string instru- 
mental ensemble and the chapel 
choir. The general public has 
been invited to attend the col- 
loquiums and the convocation 
activities. 





Honorary degree recipients Hofer and Bowles 

Students, Faculty Meet To 
Discuss Bates' Problems 

To discuss Bates College — what it is and what it should 
be — approximately twenty students met with Drs. Thumm, 
Chute and Niehaus in the faculty lounge last Friday evening. 

In the course of the discussion* 

a 'gut". Also, it does become nec- 
essary, during the course of a 
semester, to forget about two or 
three courses for a while in or- 
der to concentrate for exams or 
papers. 

Curriculum Changes 

A curriculum program which 
divided the present school year 
into three "quarters", during 
which students would take three 
courses in each "quarter" for a 
total of nine for the year was 
suggested. Dr. Thumm, a mem- 
ber of the faculty committee to 
consider changes in the curric- 
ulum calendar said that a 2% 
semester system was the plan 
which the committee had consid- 
ered. Under this a student would 
take four courses for two short- 
ened semesters and then two 
for a half-semester. 

In response to enquiries con- 
cerning what students could do 
that would be effective Dr. 
Thumm suggested that students 



all three faculty members em- 
phasized the lack of communi- 
cation between students and fac- 
ulty members. It is this lack of 
communication which prompted 
this meeting. 

Student comments covered a 
range of topics, but centered 
around discontentment with the 
policies and programs of the 
college. In particular, the Chap- 
el programs were criticized. 
"Rather than encouraging stu- 
dent interest in listening to 
speakers, the chapel programs 
serve to stultify such an inter- 
est." 

Complacency Unnecessary 

Complacency, both on the part 
of the students and faculty, was 
emphasized. The freshman core 
courses which were character- 
ized as "up-graded high school 
courses", disillusion those fresh- 
men who come to college ex- 
pecting to be challenged, and to 
find something more than what 
their secondary education has 
provided. In many instances the 
core courses are inferior to high 
school courses and thus breed 
not only complacency, but con- 
tempt. 

The value of reducing the 
number of courses taken by each 
student was also considered. At 
present many students take a 
fifth course "for their qpr" or as 



should make a greater use of the 

STUDENT to voice their objec- attendance slips would allow the 



Students Meet To 
Discuss Faculty's 
Use Of Coercion 

Overwhelmingly, the stu- 
dents of Bates College have 
repudiated the faculty deci- 
sion to compel student at- 
tendance at next week's Con- 
vocation under penalty of an 
academic overcut. 

Monday evening, at a meeting 
called by the newly formed Stu- 
dent Senate, students voted 177 
to 15 in favor of informing the 
faculty that: "We shall willing- 
ly attend the Celebration. We 
attend because: 1) We» consider 
these events worthwhile; 2) We 

respect the courtesy due a cam- 
pus guest; 3) We do not wish to 
present an unfavorable image of 
the college to the public. 

Undue Faculty Haste 

"Although we attend willing- 
ly, we strongly protest the fac- 
ulty's coercive action. The deci- 
sion, we feel, was made with un- 
due haste and disregard for stu- 
dent opinion." 

After a reading of the above, 
Senate President Robert Ahem, 
asked for student comments, 
both on the statement and on the 
faculty decision. 

Student sentiment was divid- 
ed. Almost all speakers de- 
claimed the faculty use of coer- 
cion and favored the statement, 
but some felt that "something 
more should be done". A pro- 
posal to have students attend the 
Colloquia, but not to pass in at- 
tendance slips, became the focal 
point of the discussion. 

Favor Student Volition 

Students in favor of this pro- 
posal argued that, if students 
followed the plan, they would 
show the faculty that students 
were attending the panels of 
their own volition. Attendance 
taking removes the student's 
choice, whereas not passing in 



tions and ideas. He also specu- 
lated that letters from parents 
would have an effect. 

Dr. Niehaus pointed out that 
meetings "such as this" between 
students and faculty are a very 
effective means of overcoming 
the lack of communication on 
campus. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Nov. 13 
W.A.A. Meeting — Women's 

Union, 6:30-9 
Vespers, 9:30-10, Chapel 
Fall Sports Dinner 

Thursday, Nov. 14 
Faculty Round Table 
Student Conduct Committee 
Meeting 

Friday, Nov. 15 
Community Concert, Leonard 
Rose, 'cellist, Lewiston High 
Auditorium 

Saturday, Nov. 16 
Chase Hall Dance, 8:30-11:45 
W.A.A. Sports Day. 



Barristers 

There will be a meeiing of 
the Barristers Club this eve- 
ning at 7:30 in the Faculty 
Lounge, Chase Hall, to dis- 
cuss pre -legal education and 
various law schools. Dr. 
Muller, club advisor, will 
speak. This meeting is de- 
signed to be a general dis- 
cussion of an introductory 
nature, and any students in- 
terested are invited to at- 
tend. 



students to a....rm their willing- 
ness to attend freely. 

Students in opposition to this 
action pointed out that if a stu- 
dent is willing to attend it makes 
no difference whether or not he 
passes in an attendance slip. 
Also they asked what it is that 
students are protesting. 

Change Way of Thinking 

It is not this particular faculty 
decision, but the manner in 
which such decisions are made 
that must be changed, they ar- 
gued. For the sake of not hav- 
ing the faculty repeat this "way 
of thinking", these speakers sug- 
gested "sustained action" to alter 
these instances of coercion which 
are "all around us." The chapel 
program and the cut system 
were singled out as examples of 
constant coercion. 

From such constant coercion 
comes the way of thinking which 
readily decides problems by the 
use of force. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



Notes From 
Underground 

The second meeting of the 
Bates College Student Senate 
was called to order at 6:20 p.m. 
on November 5, in the office of 
the Publishing Association. Be- 
cause of a mix-up the meeting 
could not be held in lower Lib- 
bey. Guests were P. d'Errko 
and N. Gillespie. 

President Ahern called for 
committee reports. 

ELECTIONS: Z i e g i e r an- 
nounced that on Friday, Novem- 
ber 8, there will be a meeting for 
the freshmen after chapel to ex- 
plain election procedure. On 
Wednesday, November 13, the 
petitions for the freshman of- 
fices are due in the Dean of 
Men's office. 

On Friday, November 15, those 
running for the offices will be 
given a chance to speak to the 
student body for 1-1% minutes 
each. On November 18 (Monday) 
primaries will be held in the 
Alumni Gym from 9-4. On Mon- 
day, November 25, the final elec- 
tion will be held at the same 
time and place. 

PUBLICITY: To this commit- 
tee was given the task of distrib- 
uting the minutes of the Senate 
meetings. 

Old Business 

Dr. Thumm and Prof. Leahey 
were chosen as advisors. Dorf- 
man suggested that the Senate 
invite them to next Tuesday's 
meeting. This was decided. 

New Business 

President Ahern mentioned 
that the blue-slip system was 
faulty, as is evidenced by the 
mix-up which the Senate faced 
tonight and by the fact that the 
Rob Players movies are receiv- 
ing poor attendance due to Chase 
Hall dances. The Extra Curricu- 
lar committee has taken action 
to clear up the dance - movie 
conflict. No action was taken by 
the Senate. 

Much discussion followed about 
the faculty action concerning 
Convocation and the student re- 
action to this decision. 

Meeting in Chapel 

Smyth moved that we hold a 
meeting of the student body in 
the chapel. Zimmerman second- 
ed. This motion was passed. 
Zimmerman then moved that the 
Senate draw up a statement 
about the action concerning Con- 
vocation. Smyth seconded. This 
motion was passed. 

Ahern created two committees 
to look into this problem. Com- 
mittee No. 1 (Ahern, Smyth, 
Dobson, and Steinheimer) will 
plan the student body meeting. 
Committee No. 2 (Fuller, Zim- 
merman, Parmelee, and Dobson) 
will draw up a statement about 
the action. 

It was decided that the Senate 
would meet on Thursday, No- 
vember 7, at 6:30 p.m. in lower 
Libbey to hear the reports on the 
action of these committees. 
Activity Fees 

Gillespie mentioned that there 
are large "sinking funds" in sev- 
eral campus organizations. 
Ahern also mentioned that the 
Senators see the club advisors 
and talk to the students about 
this problem. It will be discussed 
at the November 12 meeting. 

The meeting adjourned at 
7:30 p. m. 



Six Panels Consider 
Role Of Individual 

In celebration of the Bates 
Centennial Year, an academic 
colloquium will be held on 
Tuesday and Wednesday, No- 
vember 19 and 20. "The Role 
of the Individual in Pursuit 
and the Use of Knowledge" 
will be the theme of the pro- 
gram. ' 

Six symposiums will be con- 
ducted for the benefit of the 
school, four Tuesday and two 
Wednesday, in the Little Thea- 
ter. 

Open with Science 

The first symposium, Tuesday 
morning, the Physical and Bio- 
logical Sciences, has as its panel 
five well know persons. Sumner 
T. Pike '45, former member of 
the U. S. Atomic Energy Com- 
mission, will be moderator. The 
other panelists are Chester S. 
Keefer ' 62, Professor of Medi- 
cine, Boston University; Kirtley 
F. Mather '43, Professor of Ge- 
ology, Harvard University; Har- 
low Shapley '42, former director 
of the Harvard Observatory; 
William Webster '50, President, 
New England Electric System. 

Social Sciences and Education 
is the theme of the second 
symposium, held Tuesday after- 
noon. Milton D. Proctor '57, 
President Emeritus Westbrook 
Junior College, moderator; Loy 
W. Henderson '57, Diplomat; 
John L. Miller '26, Great Neck, 
N. Y., Superintendent of Schools; 
Dorothy C. Stratton '55, former 
executive director of the Girl 
Scouts; Miriam Van Waters '58, 
former superintendent Fram- 
ingham State Reformatory for 
Women; Val H. Wilson '38, Pres- 
ident of Skidmore College. 

On Wednesday, November 20, 
in the Alumni Gymnasium, 
Frank H. Bowles, Director of 
the Education Program, Ford 
Foundation and former president 
of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, will speak on the 
colloquium and the effect it has 
produced. 

More "New Voices" 

In the afternoon, the fifth 
symposium, Art and Music, of 
the series will be held. Phillip 
Hofer, Founder and Curator of 
the Department of Graphic Arts, 
Harvard College, will give an 
address. A Bates English Pro- 
fessor, Robert G. Berkelman, 
will act as chairman. The panel- 
ists include: Alonzo J. Harri- 
man '61, Treasurer of Alonzo 
Harriman and Associates, Inc.; 
Philip Hofer; Ada Holding 
Miller '52, Past President, Na- 
tional Federation of Music 
Clubs; William Thon '57, Maine 
Artist. 

Music provided by the Deans- 
men and the Merrimanders fol- 
lows this panel, and afterwards 
there will be a reception for the 
students and the Bates gradu- 
ates on the panels. 

That evening the final sym- 
posium, Literature, Drama, and 
Journalism, will be held. Erwin 
Dt Canham '25, Editor of the 
Christian Science Monitor, will 
act as moderator. The other 
panelists are Gladys Hasty Car- 
roll '25, author; Louis de Roche- 
mont '52, motion picture produc- 
er; Lester Markel '53, New York 
Times Sunday Editor; Dorothy 
Clarke Wilson '25, author. 




Performers in next Tuesday's concert 



Ambulance Driver Teaches 
O C Members In First Aid 



For the past few weeks, twen- 
ty-eight Bates students have 
been participating in a first aid 
course, directed by the Lewis- 
ton-Auburn chapter of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross. Sponsored by 
the Outing Club, it meets from 
6:00 to 8:00 on Monday nights in 
the Outing Club room under the 
Alumni Gym. 

The instructor of the course, 

Sherman Elected 
Council Pres. By 
Only Two Votes 

In the season's closest election, 
Robert Sherman '64 was selected 
as President of the Men's Proc- 
tor Council last Monday. Sher- 
man defeated opponent Jeff Hill- 
ier by two votes. ' 

The Men's Council will assume 
those duties of the previous Stu- 
dent Council which have not 
been delegated to the Student 
Senate. The council is composd 
of all men proctors. The candi- 
dates for President are selected 
by the male members of the 
Senate. 

Sherman, a native of Monroe, 
Conn., is a mathematics major 
and plans to go on to graduate 
study. This is his first year as a 
proctor. 



Mr. Garcelon, teaches from ex- 
perience. Not only does he drive 
an ambulance for the Central 
Maine General Hospital, but he 
is also an undertaker. 

Although giving a basic first 
aid course, which qualifies a per- 
son to receive a certificate of 
proficiency from the Red Cross, 
Garcelon emphasizes on skills 
the members of O. C. might find 
most valuable in their activities. 

So far, they have studied dif- 
ferent types of wounds and how 
to care for them, involving pres- 
sure points, pressure bandages, 
and the care of shock. They are 
now working on fractures, and 
learning how to splint them. 

In addition, they have re- 
ceived pointers on what to do if 
they are on the scene of an acci- 
dent. The eighteen hour course 
is taught primarily by lecture 
and demonstration, with occa- 
sional movies. 

Even though most of the stu- 
dents taking the course at the 
present time are members of the 
Outing Club Council, it is open 
to anyone who wishes to attend. 
Marion Maynard, in charge of 
the arrangements for the course, 
says that if more people show 
enough interest in having the 
course a second time, the Out- 
ing Club will try to sponsor an- 
other one. 



Guidance 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 

In an effort to give promising 
young men an opportunity to 
broaden their knowledge and 
experience in professional jour- 
nalism, the NEWSPAPER FUND 
once again is offering $500 
scholarship grants and assist- 
ance in finding summer newspa- 
per jobs. The internships are 
designed for those interested in 
newspaper work as a career. 

Applicants accepted as News- 
paper Fund interns will work in 
the newsrooms of participating 
newspapers. The internships are 
designed particularly for the 
young man in a liberal arts col- 
lege where there is no oppor- 
tunity to receive formal journal- 
ism education or to become ac- 
quainted with professional news- 
papermen. 

Applications are being re- 
ceived now on forms provided 
for this purpose. Application 
must be submitted by January 
10, 1964. Applications and fur- 
ther information are available 
at the Placement Office. 
SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

The Bureau of International 
Commerce is looking for dedicat- 
ed and intelligent men and wo- 
men interested in international 
commerce and economic matters. 
Opportunities for college gradu- 
ates and persons with graduate 
degrees lie primarily in the two 
main occupational fields of the 
Bureau, Economist and Trade 
Specialist. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

Yale University Graduate 
School announces its MASTER 
OF ARTS IN TEACHING pro- 
gram. All candidates must have 
adequate undergraduate prepart- 
tion in the proposed field of 
teaching and meet the regular 
requirements for admission to 
the Graduate School, including a 
reading knowledge of French or 
German; candidates must take 
the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion. 

For this and other M.A.T. 
programs, interested seniors with 
strong QPR are encouraged to 
consult Prof. Kendall. 




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BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



THREE 



Socratic View Of Rule By Law 
Includes Obligation To Criticize 



By JOHN BART '64 

There appear to me to be two 
main streams in the history of 
political thought. And as their 
brightest and most eloquent 
spokesmen I would choose So- 
crates and Thoreau. I am tempt- 
ed to fill the rest of this page 
with excerpts from their teach- 
ings and let them stand alone. 
But they have a real relevance 
to our situation which I wish to 
make clear. 
Civil Disobedience 

Thoreau stands, if only in 
point of time, much closer to our 
own tradition. His is the voice 
that moved such men as Gandhi 
and, in our own period, Martin 
Luther King. 

In his essay, "Civil Disobedi- 
ence" he puts forth the idea that 
the individual and his personal 
integrity transcend any laws of 
the state. "The only obligation 
which I have a right to assume is 
to do at any time what I think 
right." 

When a man feels that an act 
or a law of a state is unjust, then 
he says, ". . . the true place for 
a just man is also a prison." The 
act of protest involves following 
one's own sense of honor even 



here is a book 
that is 
helping m 
to 

find 
ourselves 



3§2 




. Sc nptures 




You, like many of us, may be 
reaching out in an effort to iden- 
tify yourself properly, — to learn 
who you are and where you are 
going. We believe we have found 
the answers to these questions in 
the Christian Science textbook, 
Science and Health with Key to 
the Scriptures by Mary Baker 
Eddy. You can find them, too. 

We invite you to come to our 
meetings and to hear how we 
are working out our problems 
through applying the truths of 
Christian Science. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
ORGANIZATION 

BATES COLLEGE 



if it means one must break the 
law. 

The man who is a man 
divorces himself from the state 
he feels to be unjust. He does 
this through acting (Thoreau 
emphasizes this) in the manner 
he believes right. The just man 
cannot serve as most men who 
serve ". . . not as men mainly, 
but as machines, with their bod- 
ies." His moral beliefs and his 
acts form an integral whole. • 

The other position to be ex- 
amined is, as I mentioned be- 
fore, that which Socrates takes 
in Plato's "Crito". In this dia 
log, Crito is pleading with the 
imprisoned Socrates to escape to 
Megara. He has been unjustly 
sentenced to die. 

Rule By Law 

But he refuses to go. Athens, 
he says, has been his parent and 
has nurtured him. And when of 
age he agreed to accept the law 
of Athens by becoming a citi 
zen. Although he has been con 
demned, rightly or not, he can- 
not break this agreement. 

To violate the contract would 
be in a way ". . . to destroy us 
(Athens), the laws, and the en 
tire state, so far as in you (So- 
crates) lies . . .". 

Here in condensed form are 
two choices. Each has a kind of 
validity and relevance for us 
The individual Bates student 
can, like Thoreau, divorce him 
self completely from the "state' 
either by leaving school or by 
accepting the penalty for his 
physical absence from the de- 
creed convocation plus two pan- 
els. This is a valid individual 
protest. 

Follow Socrates Fully 

Or he can, as Socrates did, 
realize that he has, by apply- 
ing for admission, by enrolling, 
by attending classes, etc., in ef- 



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feet signed an agreement with 
Bates. And these specific laws 
are part of his share of this 
agreement and must be obeyed. 

This latter, in some form or 
other, will be the course most of 
us will take. But there is another 
facet of Socrates' spirit which 
enters this. While being always 
willing to carry out the law, he 
also felt he had the right in fact 
the obligation, to question it if 
he felt it to be wrong. And in 
this way work to change it. 

Within The Framework 

This is a spirit very much 
alive today. It can be seen 
especially in the actions of the 
N.A.A.C.P. Founded around 1910, 
it determined to change the law 
within the framework of the 
law. Forty years of slow painful 
work culminated in the Supreme 
Court decision of 1954 on school 
integration. 

These men believe in and 
worked under rule by law be- 
cause they believed that, if not 
inherently sacred, it is at least 
the only thing we have to keep 
us from chaos. It is also the only 
way to effect lasting changes 
which are firmly based. 

There is always a danger in 
advocating transgression of a 
law. It can become very hard to 
draw a stop line. 

The Idea Of Law 

Thus, they didn't refrain from 
breaking it for fear of incurring 
punishment. They obeyed be- 
cause they believed in the idea 
of law, if not in certain statutes. 

This is the position I am ad- 
vocating. We have had a rather 
nauseating situation flung in 
our faces. Many of its implica- 
tions are in last week's editori- 
al. We could rebel. But the only 
real accomplishment of such an 
act would be to soothe our egos. 

It seems to me that the best 
course for us to take is to obey 
But intelligently. Not as "bod- 
ies". We must, now and from 
now on, ask ourselves and the 
faculty why such a situation 
came about and what must be 
done to make the next hundred 
years end more successfully. 

In a real sense, this school be- 
longs to we the students more 
than to the faculty or the ad 
ministration. What Bates is to a 
large degree affects what we are 
and what we will do. It will 
follow us all our lives. 



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Meeting time: 7:30 p.m. Sundays 
Meeting place: 93 College Street 

Science and Health is available at all 
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"THE BIRDS" 

Rod Taylor 
Jessica Tandy 
Suzanne Plesheite 



Trouble In The Sky 

Michael Craig 
Peter Cushing 



By SAM WITHERS '65 

What is essential in a work of 
art is that it should rise far 
above the realm of personal life 
and speak from the spirit and 
heart of the poet as man to the 
spirit and heart of mankind. 

C. G. Jung Modern Man in 

Search of a Soul 

With The Magician, to be pre- 
sented this Saturday in the Lit- 
tle Theatre, Ingmar Bergman 
ascends into the ranks of the 
top film creators. From the 
vague scripts of Torment, The 
Naked Night, and Smiles of a 
Summer Night, the Swedish di- 
rector delivered the profoundly 
allegorical Seventh Seal and the 
more mature Wild Strawberries. 
Finally with The Magician, he 
achieves a perfection in tech- 
nique and script unseen in the 
previous films. There is forceful, 
dazzling technique with a story 
which is a soundly philosophical 
and entirely fascinating study of 
the phenomenon of illusion. 
Necromancy And Mesmerism 

The illusionist is Doctor Vog- 
ler, a necromancer and mesmer- 
ist. Travelling through the Scan- 
dinavian provinces the magician 
is accompanied by his wife (dis- 
guised as a youth), his grand- 
mother (a witch), a dying actor, 
and his raffish coachman. An 
unsavory reputation has preced- 
ed them and they are stopped 
along the way for questioning by 
the 1 police. The inquisition takes 
place at the home of a local mer- 
chant where the troupe is 
strangely incarcerated for the 
night. 

In the course of the evening, 
the group is challenged to prove 
its supernatural powers. The 
various haunting ways in which 

It Is Our Obligation . . . 

Therefore, whether we are re- 
sponsible for this situation or 
not, we must take its conse- 
quences. But it should also open 
our eyes to the responsibility we 
owe ourselves. It is our, as it 
was Socrates', obligation to ques- 
tion and to attempt to improve. 

The progress, as with that of 
the N.A.A.C.P., will be slow. We 
cannot let that deter us. If we 
do not, then this rotten thing 
may really be transformed by 
us, and as I have said it can 
really only be done by us, into 
a golden opportunity. 



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the merchant's wife, friends, and 
servants respond make up the 
substance of the movie. Upon re- 
tiring, the magician unmasks 
himself, revealing (to the audi- 
ence) that he is but a charlatan 
and a faker. 

Although we are suprised to 
find that the magician is an or- 
dinary man with no magical 
powers, we must concede that 
even if he is not a wizard, he is 
really not ordinary either. He is 
a haunting figure floating be- 
tween the realms of the agon- 
ized mystic and the cheap vaude- 
villian. Furthermore, he is a ve- 
hicle for Bergman's indulgences 
in self -rev elation. 
Bergman Unique 

There are two points which 
make Bergman a unique film 
creator. The first is that he both 
writes and directs his scripts. 
The film you see is the one he 
conceived, not the one he 
contracted to execute. Much of 
the texture of his films comes 
from the fact that he is at once 
the conceiver and executant. 

The second point which dis- 
tinguishes Bergman is the fact 
that he has practically assem- 
bled a repertory company. The 
trenchant response to him from 
his actors and technicians proves 
its effectiveness. You may well 
recognize the actors from his 
previous films. Mark Von Sydon 
(the magician) was the chess- 
playing night in The Seventh 
Seal and the gas station attend- 
ant in Wild Strawberries. 

Sound Imagery 

Bergman is an enchanter with 
effects. His film is eerie and he 
achieves remarkable magic in 
constructing the appropriate 
mood. He relishes misty forests, 
storms, and dark closeups. His 
sound imagery is as good as the 
visual. There is an effective use 
of silence in building the effect. 
At one point, he purposely de- 
letes the sound of a coach pull- 
ing off into the night in order 
to crease atmosphere. The sound- 
track is punctuated by haunting 
guitar phrases from the remark- 
able score by Erik Nordgren. 

Bergman is enormously gifted. 
The Magician is perhaps the 
finest movie he has sent us. It 
has comedy, melodrama, and 
suspense. It's force and control 
of visual imagery would make 
the most austere and disciplined 
documentary film makers envi- 
ous. The bewitching synthesis is 
a film incisive in approach and 
superior in idea — a supremely 
entertaining movie. 



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BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



— 



Editorials 



I Let's Have A Parade 

Dr. Sidney Jackman appeared before the Cultural Heritage 
Mass Lecture last Monday morning to ask the seniors to wear 
academic gowns and march with the faculty in next Wednes- 
day's convocation. The seniors who were present voted in 
favor of the proposal. 

The decision itself is minor, but the procedure by which 
this vote was obtained is highly objectionable. No announce- 
ment of the intended voting was made, and thirty-five per 
cent of the class was not in attendance. No one else besides 
Dr. Jackman was given the opportunity to address the class 
and offer opposing views on the issue, even though individ- 
uals holding such views had asked the class president for an 
opportunity to express them. 

Dr. Jackman proclaimed, "This issue is not debateable." 
He also said, "because this decision is being made in a dem- 
ocratic manner, it should be binding on all seniors." 

We disagree. Both the decision and the means used for ob- 
taining it are highly debateable and flagrantly undemocratic. 
Yet, we are willing to accept the implication of Dr. Jack- 
man's comment that "this issue is not debateable." 

If there is nothing "common" or "outside" the individual 
i.e. something that is debateable, then there is also nothing 
binding on all seniors. If the issue is not debateable then it 
can only be decided for each individual, by personal pref- 
erence. 

Precisely because there was no "debate" on the issue, the 
vote, and therefore the decision, is meaningless. 

The senior class did not decide to wear academic gowns, 
A majority of the individuals who were present in the Fi- 
lene Room last Monday merely indicated their personal pref- 
erence, having been influenced solely by Dr. Jackman's joc- 
ularity. 



Culture And The Arts 

During the recent discussion between faculty and students 
in the faculty lounge, one of the co-eds present bemoaned the 
dearth of cultural opportunities available in Lewiston. Not 
the first time that something like this has been said, Bates 
students have described Lewiston to parents and friends as 
"a dirty, poor milltown on the banks of the polluted And- 
roscoggin where natives speak a language faintly akin to 
French." 

To hear this would seem to indicate that the museums, 
theatres, and concert halls of Boston and New York are sore- 
ly missed. And this should indicate that at the few concerts 
and lectures which are available in Lewiston more students 
will attend then there is room for. 

This has not been the cage. Even at the Ciardi lecture, 
there was room for more. Perhaps the lack of cultural oppor- 
tunities is not missed for its own sake, but just because it is 
something convenient to complain about. 

Those students who are seriously concerned, and there seem 
to be a great many, will be given the chance in the coming 
weeks to show their devotion to the arts. Leonard Rose, 
one of the world's finest cellists, will play in the Lewiston 
High School Auditorium on Friday night at 8:15. The night 
following, the Rob Players will show an Ingmar Bergman 
film, "The Magician." And on November 19 and 20 several 
symposiums will be held of great value to the student, re- 
quired attendance or no. 

M, Z. 



Letters To The Editor 



■ • 



Hates 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zirnmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
'66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 

Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-0661. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30. 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



Of Vacuums 
To the Editor: 

I find myself in general agree- 
ment with the editorial of No- 
vember 6 concerning responsi- 
bility in education. My sympa- 
thy is both cerebral and visceral 
but a dry, academic wind stirs 
among these vitals and I must 
take exception to the use of the 
phrase 'delegation of responsibil- 
ity', at least as I understand its 
menas in your context. 

Real responsibility, moral re- 
sponsibility, is not delegated. It 
is assumed by individuals. The 
absence of assumed responsibil- 
ity in a community is like a vac- 
uum — someone or somebody 
moves in. Someone has to run 
the college; manage all the di- 
vergent and conflicting inter- 
ests. 

If the faculty doesn't assume 
its proper role, if the students 
don't assume direction of their 
own affairs, the administration 
must move. What may appear to 
the students as an autocratic 
monster is at the worst a mon- 
ster they have helped to create. 
I suggest the faculty and the 
administration would be happy 
to be divested of some of the 
responsibilities that have flowed 
their way. 

Having been at Bates a short 
enough time to retain, I hope, 
some objectivity, I suggest that 
Bates has suffered from a vac- 
uum of assumed responsibility. 
The faculty makes up half of the 
vacuum, the students the other 
half. With a vigorous adminis- 
tration functioning, the result is 
not surprising. 

Responsibility in the direction 
of the college must also involve 
authority. The changes you seek 
are not to be accomplished by 
simple administrative devices. 
You are talking about a signifi- 
cant shift in the power structure 
with the college community, 
with the students (and, faculty) 
assuming a larger share of real 
responsibility and authority. 

Whatever comes of the pres- 
ent ferment, I hope you will not 
let the students fall prey to the 
argument that this "convocation 
incident" or this "chapel attend- 
ance problem" is not significant 
enough to do anything about. 
People can always be found to 
fight in support of major 
usurpations of rights, especially 
when the inevitability of change 
is evident. Witness the sudden 
growth of the 'responsibility' of 
the civil rights struggle in the 
south. 

The minor usurpations are all 
too easy to ignore, yet they form 
the background, the moral (or 
immoral) environment in which 
further restriction of individual 
choice becomes the easy solution, 
the traditional solution, to each 
new problem. 

Prof. Robert M. Chute 




Authority As An Obstacle 
To the Editor: 

Whatever its origins, the need 
for unyielding discipline of adult 
over near-adult is highly un- 
necessary in an atmosphere 
which is intended to be educa- 
tional. 

Education, most scholars would 
agree, is a synthesis of instruc- 
tive discipline (coercive ele- 
ments) and raw experience. 
Where only one of these factors 
exist true education is unattain- 
able. It seems that the former 
aspect of education is so much 
in abundance on the Bates cam- 
pus that the latter scarcely has 
room to breathe. 



When one is smothered with 
rules, regulations, punishments, 
and in general any encroach- 
ment upon an individual's liber-' 
ty, how does one learn such as- 
sets as freedom of desire, ex- 
pression, and opinion; self dici- 
pline, and independence of 
judgment? How does one become 
an individual if he is constantly 
subjected to the same exact sys- 
tem of coercive elements as ev- 
eryone else? 

The value of instructional dis- 
cipline emerges only when it ex- 
ists in the right proportion with 
experience. Similarly Montaigne 
writes, "... if he (the student) 
embraces Xenophon's and Plato's 
opinions by his own reasoning, 
they will no longer be theirs, 
they will be his. He who follows 
another follows nothing. He finds 
nothing; indeed he seeks noth- 
ing." Likewise, if he attends 
convocations and panel discus- 
sions by his own choice, the 
value of these discussions will 
no longer be the panel members, 
they will be his. He who attends 
these events by force, attends 
nothing. He finds nothing; indeed 
he seeks nothing. 

And this philosophy does not 
begin in the 16th century for 
Cicero in 140 B.C. claims "We 
are not under a king; let each 
one claim his own freedom.', and 
in 60 AD. Seneca asserts that 
"The authority of those who 
teach is often an obstacle to 
those who want to learn." 

If the aims of Bates College 
are to chiefly educate, I hope that 
it does not find these views ex- 
traordinary. 

Steve Edwards '65 



Ding-Dong School? 
To the Editor: 

This letter is perhaps but one 
of a multitude of reactions that 
will reach the ears of the stu- 
dent body, faculty, and adminis- 
tration during the net few 
weeks, concerning the current 
feeling on this campus. There- 
fore, as an individual residing in 
a community, I feel an obliga- 
tion to put my two cents in . . . 
better make it a dime. 

If I wanted to attend Ding 
Dong School I would have ap- 
peared on television, not on the 
grounds of a fine institution. 
Yes, I said fine institution, for 
with all the complaints that I 
have about certain facets of 
Bates life, I cannot deny that in 
June of 1966 (qpr willing) I 
will leave this penal colony with 
a diploma that could open many 
doors for me in my quest for 
success. 

For this I am grateful, and 
hopeful that you feel the same 



way. Yet beyond this academic 
accumulation, I feel little anti- 
cipation about two more years of 
hibernation at a locale which 
could offer so much. And for 
this, I am not grateful. 

Students have an obligation to 
any college, but the college has 
an equal obligation to its stu- 
dents. I think the students ful- 
fill their part rather well, for 
any place you go the name of 
Bates is held in high esteem. 
And a college is its students who 
so unknowingly perpetuate its 
life as if it were a national fig- 
ure. 

On the other hand, has Bates 
given its students an equal boost 
in their search for a full and re- 
warding experience that should 
add, not detract from their total 
personality? In some respects, 
yes, but in others, no. Specifical- 
ly, the upcoming centennial cel- 
ebration is like a sweet-sixteen 
without any girls. Are the stu- 
dents that have been selected so 
carefully, incapable of differen- 
tiating between right and 
wrong? If the administration 
came to us and asked for our as- 
sistance during the colloquium, 
would we have responded? From 
their actions it can be seen that 
they have little faith in our 
judgment. 

This is just one illustration in 
many of the type of experience 
that cannot add to the make-up 
of an individual. In no way does 
autocratic administration create 
self-reliance. It only promotes a 
deep-rooted bitterness between 
administration and students, that 
appears in disguise throughout 
the campus. From the strictness 
invoked in chapel and class at- 
tendance to the social regula- 
tions for young ladies, discontent 
is blossoming forth in never be- 
fore seen quantity. 

I also feel the Thanksgiving 
"recess" deserves a word of 
comment at this time. Of all 
places for thanks to be given 
New England must be consid- 
ered utmost on the list. And 
since Bates is located in New 
(Continued on page five) 

, - 

NOT REQUIRED 

One part of the two day 
Colloquium against which no 
attendance sanctions have 
been applied is the concert 
at 11:15 on Tuesday, No- 
vember 19. It will be held in 
the chapel and will feature 
Prof. D. Robert Smith, or- 
ganist; Dr. Robert Peck and 
Jane Carey Peck, descant 
and treble recorders; and 
Granville Bowie '66, trum- 
pet. See picture on page 
two. 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13 1963 



Write 



mittees to arrange for a mass 
meeting in the Chapel. At this 
meeting we were to be asked to 
unanimously support a resolu- 
tion calling for a single mode of 
conduct from all students. The 
resolution would pass, and off 
we would go behind our leaders 
to behave in a single accepted 
way. 

In effect we have fought fire 
with fire. Outraged by a disre- 
gard for personal freedom of 
choice by a governing group, we 
threw away any personal choic- 
es to join our own governing 
group in a unified attack upon 
tyranny. Students who strongly 
suggested alternate plans of pro- 
test were asked to forget their 
plans and join the rest of the 
students for the common good. 

It would seem the most logi- 
cal thing to have done would 
have been to forget any thoughts 
of mass meetings and unified ac- 
tion and leave methods of pro- 
test (or non-protest) up to in- 
dividual choice. We are fighting 
for individual freedom of choice, 
aren't we? Why is conforming to 
our group opinion necessarily 
better than conforming to their 
group opinion? If bowing to 
group commands is wrong, why 
fight it with a group command? 
I leave the question for each in- 
dividual to decide — and we 
don't have to agree. 

David A. Williams '65 



Something Higher 
To the Editor: 

"It is their fault, it is their 
law. Because they did it, we are 
left with only one choice — that 
is to fight against their empty 
law." 

How have we managed to cre- 
ate this duality between "they" 
and . "us"? Is it possible for a 
law to have been made without 
having had someone deserve it 
— without someone having 
asked for it? 

Haven't we deserved our law? 
Have we not requested the law 
through little indirect pleadings 
for escape from responsibility — 
for permission to ignore what it 
means to be a student? We do 
not have the right to this con- 
tinual cynicism against a distant 
"them" until each of us destroys 
the little "administration" with- 



in himself. 

I have seen so many habits 
created for the sake of habit. The 
Bates student has created count- 
less empty rituals in which to 
"live." Even those symbols 
which once were meaningful — 
which were drawn from some- 
thing good — are often cut off 
from their source. The value in 
which they had their beginning 
has frequently been lost through 
over-habituation; and the rituals 
are now only shells in which to 
sleep. 

Perhaps convocation is a mean- 
ingless symbol to the student, 
but is it empty only because we 
ourselves did not create it? 

Student action always seems 
to lack grace. There is no cour- 
tesy in it. By courtesy I do not 
mean good manners, or a for- 
mality with which to soften bit- 
terness. Courtesy is not a hypo- 
critical thing. It should be nat- 
ural, coming from a thoughtful- 
ness — a knowledge that in the 
human world there is no "stu- 
dent" and no "administration." 
Courtesy that is not natural — 
that is not a result of knowledge 
— is an empty ritual, and a shell 
to sleep in. 

In the human world there is 
certainly the father and the 
child. There are differences in 
ages; and there are men who 
have tested things, or at least 
men who have seen them tested. 
But out of the older man's great- 
er experience should come a 
"fullness' of person. 

There should be a natural 
respect of the younger for the 
"fuller," older person. Respect, 
like courtesy, arises from knowl- 
edge. Fathers, however, just be- 
cause they've gone through many 
experiences and tried many 
things, do not necessarily have 
this "fullness' — they are not al- 
ways worthy of respect, as they 
should be. The child must have a 
father he can respect — this is 
his right — because he needs 
the leadership such a person 
can give. 

In the restraints put on the 
spirit of free inquiry, we are, in 
part, denied this right. We are 
denied the right to insist upon 
an administration worthy of 
respect, and capable of providing 
the leadership we need to be- 



come "full" persons — persons 
worthy of respect and capable of 
leadership. 

This is an institution of higher 
learning. 

There should be something 
higher here. 

Tarn Neville '66 



.: Louis P. Nolin ;. 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sis. 

Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



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Member F. D. I. C. 



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But a Depositors Trust Company Special Checking 

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When you pay all your bills with a Depositors Special 
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Let's Make Believe 
To the Editor: 

This letter is to protest the 
compulsory convocation and col- 
loquia of next week. I appreci- 
ate the fact that some solution 
is needed in regard to attend- 
ance, but the problem might 
have been avoided. 

It is my contention that this 
problem was caused by having 
had so many outside speakers 
that the students' "spirit of in- 
quiry" has become oversaturat- 
ed. We are fed a great number of 
speakers through the Chapel, 
many of whom are uninteresting. 
They are not uninteresting to all, 
to be sure, but they must lecture 
to all in a short, ineffective 
speech. Everyone cannot be 
pleased all the time, and so the 
lecturer must absorb the unin- 
tending abuse of the disinter- 
ested. 

And it is this disinterest which 
fosters only more disinterest. It 
is hard to become interested in 
something that has been so dis- 
appointing in the past, as well 
as being coupled with unpleas- 
ant memories of rigid attend- 
ance rules. 

Convocation is another prob- 
lem. Webster defines convoca- 
tion: "The annual meeting . . ." 
In one week we shall have the 
third convocation in less than 
eight weeks. It is fully realized 
that this is a unique year for 
Bates, but is not this third con- 
vocation, as well as all the re- 
quired chapels, career confer- 
ences, and other events a wee bit 
too much cake? 

Another question is that of 
dressing "like on Sunday." May- 
be I should take a bath like on 
"Saturday night", too. Out of 
convention I will don coat and 
tie for the convocation, but it is 
a mistake to think that we will 
impress our guests by wearing 
coats and heels, respectively, for 
the whole period. For they will 
realize only too well what a 
farce that idea is. 

I laud the administrators for 
their attempts to bring in good 
speakers. However, they cannot 
hope to interest everyone each 
time we have a speaker if they 
insist on oversaturating our ap- 
petite for inquiry. 

Stephen Hulsiaer '66 



The Problem 
To the Editor: 

Governor Reed: "I remind the 
College of its duty to maintain 
high standards of study and of 
instruction. I charge it to serve 
all and to be subservient to 
none . . ." 

President Phillips: "For Bates 
College ... We accept your 
charge to serve." 

Faculty: "We, the faculty of 
Bates College, renew our pledge 
to stimulate mental growth and 
moral responsibility in our stu- 
dents." 

Students: "We dedicate our- 
selves to taking full advantage of 
our opportunities." 

Trustees: "For the governing 



Our Readers 

(Continued from page four) 
England, I would expect some 
recognition of this turkey feast. 
Rich in tradition, conservative 
in actions, no better place could 
be found for celebration; how- 
ever, we only merit a one day 
abstinence from class, and not 
even the weekend for furlough. 

I know of no other school 
that has such a policy concern- 
ing that November holiday, but 
for that matter I know of no 
other school like Bates. This dis- 
tinction is not totally beneficial, 
as I have tried to point out in 
the previous lines and the only 
way that we can possibly im- 
prove our own existence is to 
make our presence as a commun- 
ity felt on this campus. 

By no means do I advocate 
any action defamatory to the 
stature of the college, for our 
goal is to strengthen, not to 
weaken. However, by peaceful 
or non-peaceful attempts, in a 
dignified manner, accomplish- 
ments can be achieved in our 
era at Bates. If, on the contrary 
we complain but do nothing, 
apathy will again set in and the 
gates may forever be closed. 

The action an individual 
should take, if he so desires to 
do anything, is his own, and not 
for me to sanction or advise. I 
can only do my best in the hope 
that some day Hathorn Hall will 
ring for liberalism at Bates. 

Jeffrey L. Starr '66 



Individual Anarchy 
To the Editor: 

It would seem to me that in 
the last analysis, the battle over 
Convocation centers around the 
rights of an individual's free- 
dom versus the rights of a gov- 
ernment to command him. Tak- 
ing this as our premise, let's ex- 
amine the method the studentry 
of Bates College has chosen in 
attempting to combat this wrong. 

First we all looked to our Stu- 
dent Government for leadership. 
We were not disappointed, for 
our leaders organized two com- 




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body ... We reaffirm our belief 
in freedom of academic research 
and expression, and we recog- 
nize our obligation to maintain 
this freedom." 

Where do we all fall short? 

First and foremost I'd like to 
present what I feel are the basic 
reasons for the poor attendance 
of the Dedicatory Convocation. 
I am not saying that they were 
not considered by the faculty 
when deciding upon mandatory 
attendance for the coming con- 
vocation. Nonetheless, I think 
these reasons are justified. 

First of all, this Convocation 
was held on a week-end — 
which is an ideal opportunity to 
go home. Students who left cam- 
pus did so for many reasons: a) 
They needed a change of pace, 
b) because home-coming is such 
a dating affair and they pre- 
ferred not to remain stag, c) be- 
cause it was home-coming week- 
end at many colleges and they 
had outside invitations. 

More important I feel there 
was inadequate publicity of ex- 
actly what the Convocation pro- 
gram was, and what its purpose 
was. There were regrets after- 
wards on the part of some stu- 
dents who didn't realize that the 
entire program was not for the 
dedication of the new buildings. 
Perhaps it is their fault, perhaps 
not. 

In spite of all this, what I feel 
is the fundamental reason for 
poor student attendance remains 
unsaid. It is simply this — that 
the entire emphasis of the Back- 
to-Bates week-end was on the 
alumni. All of the social events 
were mainly for their benefit, 
they received first opportunity 
to buy tickets to the play, they 
sat in the best seats at the game. 

I am not, believe me, saying 
this is wrong. It is as it should 
be. They were our guests and 
deserved this. But somewhere 
along the line, the students were 
overlooked, as was almost neces- 
sary. There is no argument there, 
but the fact remains that some 
Bates students did not a) feel 
they were wanted at the Convo- 
cation (they thought it was for 
alumni only) b) feel they were 
a part of it. The Old Grads 
were back, or c) wanted at all, 
thus resentment at being pushed 
aside for one week-end of the 
year. I do not feel this was jus- 
tified, any of it, but it is bound 
to happen, and for many was 
simply a case of sincere con- 
fusion. 

I think these reasons pretty 
much cover most of the student 
reaction. I suppose I might say 
some students were "apathetic" 
but even if this reason is valid 
for some it is too small a repre- 
sentation to really matter in the 
final analysis. 

If apathy exists, it is for a 
reason, it has been caused. You 
cannot, each year, pick 250 of 
the best from applicants to a col- 
lege and automatically choose 
only those who are apathetic. 
They are made that way when 
they get here. How, I don't know. 
But that is another issue. 

Now, with this foundation in 
mind, I would like to quickly 
point out how these reasons ap- 
ply (or don't apply) to the 
coming Convocation Seminar at 
Bates. 

1) There will be no week-end 
problem. No home-coming par- 
ties off campus, much less of a 
tendency to cut and go home. 
No need to feel required to date 
or be dated. 

2) Publicity — well, let's put 
it this way: IF this two-day fes- 

(Continued on page six) 



six 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



Letter To The Editor 



(Continued from page five) 
tival were to have been properly 
advertised before all this man 
datory attendance business, in 
terest would have been aroused. 
It has been before, simply 
through effort and psychology. 
Take the Ciardi lecture. 

3) And, most important of 
all, this is a student affair. It is 
our festival, contrived and to be 
executed for us. That is the way 
the administration wanted it. 
This apparent interest in us is 
flattering and all-important. It 
would have been the best com 
mercial for all concerned about 
attendance. But again, I use the 
past tense, because any enthusi- 
asm has been crushed before it 
had a chance to make itself 
known. It could have existed, 
but now cannot. 

May I, in semblance of a de- 
duction, present a few more 
personal observations in regards 
to all this. 

1) I agree attendance was 
poor and humiliating for the 
first Convocation, and that some- 
thing should be done. 

2) But I feel the students' 
reasons are valid. I tend to doubt 
they were considered carefully, 
BECAUSE NO EFFORT WAS 
MADE ON THE PART OF THE 
FACULTY OR ADMINISTRA- 
TION TO CONTACT ANY STU- 
DENT ORGANIZATION BE- 
FORE THIS RECENT DECI- 
SION WAS MADE! No matter 
how omnicient the faculty may 
be, they cannot possibly see the 
whole of the student point of 
view. Thus perhaps this whole 
problem could have been other 
wise resolved. 

I think the faculty decision a 
poor one, and unrepresentative. 
There are some who openly pro- 
pose rebellion on the part of the 
students, others who preach pass- 
ive resistence, and others who 
maintain we are wrong and must 
accept the decree. At least this 
PROVIDES that this* is not an 
open-and-shut case. There is still 
much to be considered. The vote 
should have been deferred. 

What then, is the ideal solu- 
tion? If this matter remains 
completely unresolved it will 
tend to instigate a feeling of 
dissatisfaction and malcontent 
before it is naturally due to ap- 
pear. I think the student outlook 
would tend to become negative, 
and remain so for a while. 

The only escape I see is for 
the decision to be quietly re- 
voked. I think the students will 
then accept the responsibility of 
attendance willingly. Let the 
professors require, or suggest, 
that majors in a particular field 
should attend a certain seminar, 
or two, or three. This is perfectly 
acceptable. The choice still lies 
within the student. 

If the situation remains as is 
the administration will win, to 
be sure. But what is the gain? 
Attendance. Nothing more. 
Surely none of us is going to 
reduce education to a mere fac- 
tor of attendance. This is nei- 



Cross Country Finishes Season; 
McKusick Wins New Englands 



By AL HARVIE '65 
The cross-country team came 
up with its second perfect score 
shut-out of the season by defeat- 
ing St. Anselm's College 15-50. 
Running in hurricane weather 
this past Friday afternoon, the 
Garnet placed its seven runners 
in the first seven places. Finish- 
ing first for the Bobcats was 
(you guessed it) frosh Karl 
McKusick who extended his own 
personal dual meet record to 
nine first places to one second 
place, which is also the team's 
record. In second place once 
again was Captain Eric Silver- 
berg who competed in his last 
home cross-country meet. 
Mudder 

Sophomore Ken Trufant must 
be termed a "mudder" as he 
came up to snatch third place 



splashed home in the final scor- 
ing spot — fifth place. Captur- 
ing the perfect score of 15-50 for 
the 'Cats were sophomores Paul 
Swensen and Marshal Snow who 
finished sixth and seventh re- 
spectively. 

This completed the dual meet 
season for the cross-country 
team which finished with an as- 
tonishing 90% winning season. 
Besides the regular dual meets, 
Bates varsity and freshman 
teams finished fourth and third 
respectively in the Easterns. 

Compete In Large Field 

This past Monday the team 
once again returned to Boston, 
this time to compete in the New 
Englands in which twenty-three 
colleges were represented by ap- 
proximately 135 athletes. In the 
varsity meet Bates finished in 



from Finn Wilhelmsen who fin- tenth place behind the first place 
ished fourth. Basil Richardson Brown University. Individual 



Today I would like you all to 
become acquainted with "Zeus," 
who, I am sure you will be hear- 
ing much of in the forthcoming 
weeks. Zeus, as you know, was 
the mythical king of the Greek 
gods. Our Zeus looks like a 
Greek god, but certainly isn't 
mythical — he is, however, 
rapidly on his way to becoming 
legend. I am speaking, of 
course, about the infamous Art 
"Zeus" Agnos. 
Spark Of Hope 

After a colossal flop of the Off 
Campus attempt at football, some 
Grace of God appeared necessary 
to set the Playboys back on their 
feet — and Zeus certainly must 
be God-sent as he has guaranteed 
victories in both the volleyball 
and basketball leagues. As play- 
maker and captain of the O. C. 
volleyball squad, and player- 
coach of the basketball quintet, 
Zeus appears to be the biggest 
drawing card in intramural his- 
tory. 

The intramural football scene 
was quiescent this past week 



with J.B., the A League victors, 
awaiting their encounter with 
the B League champs from 
Smith Middle. The winner will 
receive an invitation to the 
"Fish" Bowl on New Year's Day 
— if justice prevails, J.B. will 
be present. You boys over there 
really are! 

Cribbage Corner 

Rick DeStafano and his boys 
are having secret cribbage prac- 
tice sessions in West Parker to 
prime Rick for the cribbage 
tournament — because Rick con- 
tinually loses, he remains the 
dark horse. 

Because there were no games 
played this week, the choice of 
Intramural Man of the Week 
was exceedingly difficult. The 
honors, therefore, must go 'to 
"Rosey" Whelan, for voicing his 
Bowdie enthusiasm over the 
radio. 

"Horses to Watch" will be dis- 
continued indefinitely in an at- 
tempt to exonerate myself as 
well as appease our editor and 
his very competent assistant. 



honors in the meet went to 
Keefe of Central Connecticut, 
first place, Broulet, U. of Mass., 
second place, and Crothers 
( Eastern's champ ) , Central 
Conn., third place. The order of 
finish for the Bates varsity was: 
Silverberg, Wilhelmsen, Tru- 
fant, Richardson, and Celler. 

With the same twenty-three 
teams in the freshman meet, 
Bates finished eighth. After 
proving himself the best in the 
Eastern Intercollegiate Confer- 
ence last week, frosh Karl Mc- 
Kusick came through with an- 
other stellar performance to 
prove himself the best in New 
England. This brings his total 
individual opponents to approx- 
imately two hundred and fifty 
and he has lost to only one of 
these. These two "big" wins for 
Karl definitely name him as the 
man to beat in the I.C. 4 A's in 
New York next Monday. Karl 
will be the only representative 
from Bates in this meet. Other 
Bobkitten scorers were: Swen- 
sen, Kreutzig, Lyman, and Bald- 
win. » 

With most of these fine run- 
ners plus many others currently 
practicing for the winter track 
season, Coach Slovenski should 
be able to look to the winter pro- 
gram with great expectations. 

This being the last cross- 
country article, I would like to 
take this opportunity to congrat- 
ulate Coach Slovenski and his 
team on their outstanding rec- 
ord. A special "thanks" is due the 
managers for their fine coopera- 
tion. In closing, may I just add, 
"Good luck, Karl, in the I.C. 
4 As." 



Soccer Team Tops 
Clark In Rain, 3-2 

By AL WILLIAMS '64 

The Bates soccer team upped 
its record to 6-2-1 with a 3-2 
win over Clark last Thursday in 
the ever present rain. A few 
loyal fans braved the water to 
cheer the Bobcats on, however. 
Lloyd Bunten opened the scor- 
ing for the garnet in the first 
half. This tally proved to be the 
only score of the half and Bates 
led 1-0. 

Tied Up 

The Clark team came back to 
even the score 1-1 early in the 
third quarter. However, Bob 
Lanz hit the scoring trail and the 
Bates booters pulled away. 
Lanz's two goals, his 16th and 
17th of the year, upped the mar- 
gin to 3-1. Late in the game a 
Clark corner kick literally 
slipped through the. wet fingers 
of Jimmie Onemeylukwe and 
Clark pulled to within one goal. 
This served only to give the wet 
Clark supporters a little bit to 
cheer about as the game ended 
soon afterwards. 

The Bates team was without 
one of its stars, Dan Hagglund, 
who sustained an injured leg in 
the Bowdoin match. His replace- 
ment Eddie Wells played well, 
and nearly missed getting two 
goals. George Beebe continued 
his fine play at center halfback. 
Bob Thompson was his usual 
"steady self" at fullback. 



Colby Drops 
Booters, 3-2 



Bobcat Of The Week 



ther Bates nor college, but an 
institution whereby students fol- 
low a set plan, each faithfully 
moving his physical being from 
place to place, while his self re- 
mains behind. Is this what we 
are coming to? 

Sometime, as Dean Healy men- 
tioned, an ideal college will ex- 
ist. I see such a place as one 
where the students are able to 
bring themselves to give the fac- 
ulty and administration the 
credit they deserve, and where 
the faculty and administration 
will recognize fully the maturity 
and needs of the students. 

In such a place chapel pro- 
grams, activities, and the like 
would be so stimulating that 
there would be no attendance 
problem. "Apathy" would not be 



given a chance to breed. In such 
a place it would not be neces- 
sary to remind students to dress 
well for an occasion, when past 
experience has already showed 
they assume this responsibility. 

In said college of the future 
the faculty and students would 
confer on such issues as this and 
think them out together, present- 
ing both viewpoints, and ac- 
cepting the other as a mature 
evaluation. In such a place stu- 
dents would be so proud of their 
college that they would take 
measures to insure the continu- 
ance of its good reputation. 

But this is a college of the fu- 
ture, and Bates is in the pres- 
ent. So are we all. What is go- 
ing to be done about it? 

Priscilla Clark '66 




Bob Thompson 

Selected this week for Bobcat 
honors is a sophomore from 
West Hartford, Conn. Bob 
Thompson, an economics or 
psychology major, received the 
high acclaim of his coach for his 
outstanding defensive prowess 
all season, and particularly in 
the Clark and Colby games. 

Working in the left fullback 
slot with a fine defensive unit, 
Bob's consistent ability to block 
the big shots and make the long 
pass has amazed all followers of 
the game. His proficiency in 
handling the top Colby scorer of 
the season was also singled out 
as remarkable. 



The soccer team ended its sea- 
son Monday at Colby in the rain. 
Colby, by winning 3-2, won the 
State Series soccer title. Bates is 
in possession of a second place 
tie with Bowdoin. 

Coach Sigler changed his line- 
up for the curtain closer, plac- 
ing Art Agnos in the nets and 
Jim Onemeylukwe to the line. 

Mule Opens 

Colby opened the scoring in 
first period with an indirect 
kick. But Dan Hagglund knotted 
the count with a direct kick. He 
scored again in the second quar- 
ter on a penalty kick. However, 
the obstinate Mules countered 
with a goal of their own, and the 
score at half-time stood at 2-2. 

Colby scored the decisive tal- 
ly in the third quarter, and the 
game ended with the score 3-2. 
This game was similar to the first 
Colby - Bates encounter, with 
Bates knocking at the scoring 
door twenty times, Colby ten. 

Good Season 

Bates' final statistics show that 
the Garnet team scored thrity- 
seven goals as opposed to 21 for 
the opposition. Bob Lanz has ac- 
counted for seventeen of these, 
Dan Hagglund for 11. The final 
record shows Bates with six 
wins, three losses, and one tie. 



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PAPERBACKS 

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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



#7 
SEVEN 



President Phillips 
Surprises Students 
At Sophomore Rally 

By JEFF STARR '66 
Last Friday evening the Alum- 
ni Gymnasium was filled with 
the sounds of excitement, as the 
sophomore class held the final 
football rally of the season. Per- 
haps I am a bit partial, but the 
general agreement was that this 
ensemble was not only the fin- 
est of the year, but also the best 
to come along for quite some 
time. From start to finish a touch 
of elegance was in clear view, 
except I feel rather dismal about 
those who lost their chapel cuts 
by not going. 

Expert Showmanship 

A major part of this expert 
showmanship was due to the 
capabality of Art "The Lover" 
Valliere, who acted as a supreme 
master of ceremonies. In corrob- 
oration with members of the 
class of '66, some interesting and 
amusing skits were aired for the 
enjoyment of the near capacity 
crowd. After the introduction of 
the football and cross country 
teams, the appearance of a Colby 
mule made the scene rather 
clean; for Tom Hay den, the 
cool mule, certainly had a lot of 
class. Max "the maid" Stein- 
heimer, Alex Wood, the "entic- 
ing", Raging Russ Reilly, and 
Deaf Bob Borland followed in 
consecutive skits, depicting dif- 
ferent facets of college life. 

Surprise Guest 

With the band playing and the 
cheerleaders jumping, the stage 
seemed set for something majes- 
tic to conclude the rally. It was, 
for with the wheeling in of a 
monstrous birthday cake, it was 
none other than the president 
who leaped from the batter. Not 
Kennedy (whom Arthur could 
not get to fly up from Washing- 
ton), but our own President 
Phillips. A standing ovation for 
some three minutes reverberated 
from the walls of the gym, as the 
audience could not get over the 
appearance of this man. In be- 
tween kisses from his favorite 
twirler, Prexy managed to find 
some kind words, but that was 
not necessary, for his fervor 
championship created a feeling 
for the remainder of the even- 



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W. A. A. News 



By MARCIA FLYNN '65 

Again due to poor weather, 
the hockey team has lost many 
hours of practice time for the 
"playday" which is this Satur- 
day, November 16th. As the re- 
sult of no practice, Coach Nell 
still has not announced a first 
team. Therefore, I'll devote my 
column this week to an explana- 
tion of hockey terminology 
rather than a pregame lineup. 

Just an explanation of "play- 
day". Since there is no chance 
for actual interteam college 
hockey in Maine due to distances 
of schools, money, transporta- 
tion, etc., one day has been des- 
ignated each fall as a playday 
between Colby, Maine, Bates, 
with the event rotating to each 
school yearly. On this assigned 
day, each school plays the 
other from about 10 a. m. to 3 
p. m.. Indeed, this is a full day 
of hockey with lunch served be- 
tween halves and tea held the 
final halves. Again this year the 
festivities are to be held here on 
the field adjacent to J.B. 

Spectators who know little of 
the foremats of hockey, feel that 
it is a slow game. But in reality, 
hockey is a continuously moving, 
fast, exhausting and hard-hitting 
game which is quite comparable 
to soccer. There are eleven play- 
ers; 2 wings, 2 inners, a center, 
left tackle, center, and right 
tackle halfbacks, left tackle and 
right tackle fullbacks and goalie. 
Now I'll define some terms so 
that the game you view Saturday 
will be a bit clearer: 

Bully — Like a face off in ice 
hockey. The procedure by the 
center forwards which begins 
the game. 

Sticks — Stick brought above 
shoulders in either front or back. 
A free hit taken by the opposing 
halfback. 

Advancing — Ball touching 
any part of your body — free hit 
by opposition. 

Obstructing — Getting your 
shoulder between the ball and 
the opposition. 

Turning — Can only turn to 

ing. As Mr. V. put it, "No other 
college, if any, could boast the 
fact that their President was 
such a good sport and down to 
earth guy, that he would hop 
out of a birthday cake." 

Here the story is complete, as 
after that anything would be 
anticlimatic. So "Goodnight, Mrs. 
Calabash, wherever you are." 



the right when picking up a ball 
and reversing its direction. 

Roll In — Roll taken by half- 
back if ball goes out of bounds — 
outside of line, halfback rolls 
ball which must touch the 
ground within three feet. If not, 
roll in by opposition. 

Off Sides — When forward line 
is over 25 yard line, they must 
stay on line with ball, unless 
there are three defense men be- 
tween them and the ball. 

Corner — Fouls committed in 
the striking circle, or ball hit out 
by offense over end lines require 
a corner. This involves the de- 
fense bring up on end line and 
offense on same circle "striking 
circle" around the cage with a 
free hit by wing from end line. 

Free Hit — Drive taken by 
halfbacks at the point where a 
foul is committed up to the for- 
ward line. 

Dangerous Hitting — The ball 
may not go into the air more 
than a few inches as it is 
dangerous to the safety of the 
players — free hit by the opposi- 
tion. 

The above are a few of the 
basic forms for understanding 
the hockey game which we know 
you'll enjoy if you attend at 
least in part next Saturday. The 
men's teams profit from specta- 
tor encouragement; so will the 
women. "See ya there!" 



< X£ 




Bowdoin Captures Series 
By Shocking Maine, 7-0 



Cheerleader 




(Talbot Photo) 

another college success story or 
is it a story of a poor, backward 
hick who fought her way to the 
top? Well, it's neither one! 

Judi's cheering finesse comes 
from her years as an "Army 



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The Polar Bears of Bowdoin, 
in a shocking display of defen- 
sive power, took the mighty Uni- 
versity of Maine 7-0 in the 
state's biggest upset. 

Maine went into the game 
with awesome wins over state 
rivals Bates and Colby and 
loomed as the pre-game favor- 
Brat." When her father was 
stationed down in Panama, Judi 
cheered the army teams on. For 
the rest of her travel itinerary 
the energetic megaphone. Is this 

Who's the cheerleader who's 
constantly molding in Hedge 
Laboratory? It's Judi Laming 
with the short blond locks and 
Judi lived three years in Japan 
and now resides in good old 
Natick, Massachusetts. 

Locomotive Cheer 

Judi has the honor of contrib- 
uting the "Garnet locomotive" 
cheer. The new squad works well 
together and new cheers like 
Judi's add the needed enthusi- 
asm for student participation in 
athletics. 

Maine weather does not suit 
this cheerleader's favorite pas- 
time. However, when the 
warmth of springtime dons this 
institution of higher learning, 
she may frequently be found 
gracing the Bates College tennis 
court. * 

In the oncoming basketball 
season, we will all appreciate the 
agile peppiness of this sopho- 
more's cheerleading which she 
has displayed in the past foot- 
ball season. 



ite. But Bowdoin, with only one 
loss itself, and that to mighty 
Amherst, had ideas of its own. 

The game was scoreless until 
early in the fourth period when 
a forward pass from Bob Har- 
rington to Paul Soule to Capt. 
Drigotas on a faked end run was 
good for forty yards and moved 
Bowdoin to the Maine seven 
yard line. Quarterback Bob 
Harrington then threw to Bruce 
Alemian for the crucial score. 
Barry Smith kicked the extra 
point and the score stood at 7-0. 

Maine tried numerous come- 
backs, all of which were stopped 
by the Bowdoin defense. A Maine 
field goal attempt by Boucher 
fell short in the fourth period. 

The Bowdoin touchdown drive 
started on their own twenty- 
four. Al Ryan totaled nine yards 
in two successive attempts with 
Soule crashing over for the first 
down. Two dive plays gave Bow- 
doin a first on their own forty- 
six and then came the import- 
ant Harrington to Soule to Dri- 
gotas pass play. 



FINAL STATE FOOTBALL 
STANDINGS 

W L Pts. Opp. 

Bowdoin 3 0 42 20 
Maine 2 1 104 19 

Colby 1 2 33 83 

Bates 0 3 14 71 



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EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 13, 1963 



Mules Drop Gridsters In Mud, 8 - 7 

Yuskis Scores Lone Garnet TD 
On First Play From Scrimmage 

By KEITH BOWDEN '64 
Last Saturday the Bates varsity football team travelled to Waterville to meet the 
Colby Mules. Once again the Bobcats were edged out in the closing moments on a rain- 
soaked field with the 'Cats ending up on the short end of an 8-7 verdict. 

Once again, as at Bowdoin,* 
the Bobcats scored the first time 




With NICK BASBANES 

With the results of the Colby game now a matter of mem- 
ory, the annual reign of King Football gives way to the prep- 
aration of the indoor sports. Both the track and basketball 
teams of Coaches Slovenski and Peck respectively are dili- 
gently training for their seasonal openers. But before we 
lower the curtain on this year's gridiron edition, perhaps a 
few of my methodical meditations could be elaborated upon. 
My intention is not to sit in judgment of the Bates team's 
prowess on the field with regard to the results of their regu- 
lar season games. For the post mortems of a grandstand quar- 
terback are generally useless (well, maybe not all of the 
time). Instead, I wish to deal with the matter of the sport it- 
self, and the rewards implicit in the actual playing of the 
game. 

To the Saturday observer it would naturally appear that 
the 'Cats' record of two wins and five losses is indicative of 
an unsuccessful season. But football, when played from the 
heart, never results in a fruitless venture. For the game pro- 
vides for the individual an opportunity to learn the true val- 
ues of self-discipline. It gives him a chance to develop a 
genuine competitive spirit. And while a player can make 
himself an outstanding individual, he also learns the neces- 
sity of working together with others as a unit. If you look 
into the assets of the game you can perceive a level of dem- 
ocratic understanding coupled with a unique sense of 
equality. For football is the same for all men. Distinctions 
of race and creed have no place on the gridiron. And though 
physical contact is hard and solid, the moral character is 
openly enhanced. 

I am speaking of football with such enthusiasm here for a 
specific reason. For it is with this assurance that I look with 
dismay at the student action of last week at the University of 
Chicago. This past Saturday a group of students picketed the 
Stagg athletic field in an attempt to block the playing of a 
scheduled game. The University has had no football on a 
varsity level since 1939, when several winless seasons pre- 
cipitated its dropping from the Big Ten ranks. But in the 
last few years football has made its return on a non-varsity 
level. And it is with the fear of its return to official football 
status that this group of "problem solvers" raised "Ban the 
Ball" placards. 

Now this may sound like an amusing occurrence, and ac- 
tually it is. But the grim humor lies not so much in this un- 
precedented move itself as it does in the motivations of the 
students. The joke is that no apparent reason was cited for 
the move. In their attempt to suppress a group's desire for 
freedom it becomes obvious that these people have nothing 
really to be opposed to. And this basically is the difficulty 
with many problems today. People get so intensely excited 
about something that they have no real motive for their 
prejudices save for their biased enthusiasm. 

As quoted in the New York Sunday Times, Warner Wick, 
the dean of students, pleaded over the loudspeaker: "Now 
you people, you fundamentalists who are also dogmatists, 
why don't you let some other people have their fun?" You 
can expand this feeling on the suppression of football to the 
suppression of other men's rights. And to get back to the 
presence of freedom, in this place with the regard to football, 
I might say that our boys did have more points scored against 
them this year. But they can consider themselves holders of 
a much larger prize. 



they had possession of the ball. 
This time it was sophomore 
halfback John Yuskis dashing 
through the line, cutting to the 
sidelines and outracing two Col- 
by defenders in a 75-yard dash 
to paydirt. Freshman Bill Paris 
placekicked the extra point and 
the Garnet had a quick 7-0 lead. 
From this point on it was an af- 
ternoon of frustration for the 
Bobcats as they were unable to 
cross the Colby goal line again. 

Colby Holds On 

Colby was able to play 
possession ball a great deal in 
the first half. A combination of 
tough defense by the Bobcats 
and Colby fumbles kept the 
Mules from scoring until John 
Cookson's punt was downed on 
the Bobcat one yard line. Unable 
to crack the Colby line in two 
attempts, Capt. Paul Planchon 
went back to punt on third 
down. A high-pass from center 
resulted in a fumble. Planchon 
alertly slapped it out of the end 
zone for a Colby safety. 

Colby came back with a drive 
to the Bates nine, but Jim Cal- 
lahan recovered another Colby 
fumble just before the end of 
the half. 

Mudcats 

The second half resulted in a 
defensive struggle on a field re- 
sembling a swamp. The turning 
point came late in the third 
quarter when Bates recovered a 
fumble on the Colby 10 yard line 
and pushed it within inches of 
the goal line on three tries. On 



fourth down a fumble in the 
backfield was recovered by Col- 
by end Bruce Waldman on the 
five yard line. Deep in their own 
territory, Colby resorted to a 
screen pass from quarterback 
Dick Robbat to halfback Bill 
George. Behind good Colby 
blocking, George eluded the 
Bobcat defenders for a 95 yard 
play that put the Mules on top. 
The extra point failed, but the 
Mules led 8-7. 

Bates tried to rescue mem- 



bers of the Garnet turned in fine 
performances. Capt. Paul Plan- 
chon had some exciting runs. 
John Williams played his usual 
sound game on defense and in 
the backfield. Jim Callahan, 
Steve Ritter, Mike Traverso, Pat 
Donovan and Mike Carr turned 
in some good line play. 
Mule Aerial Record 

The Robbat to George pass 
play covering 95 yards was the 
longest touchdown pass in state 
series history. The victory for 




John Yuskis goes through Colby blockers to make tackle 
on Colby halfback (Sentinel Photo) 



selves in the waning moments of 
the last quarter as Planchon 
and Carr gained some yardage, 
but they could not sustain any 
drive and the game ended with 
the score still 8-7. 
Despite the loss, several mem- 



MULES CONTINUE CAT TAMING 

Colby 

First Downs 15 

Yards Rushing 110 

Passes Attempted 18 

Completed 7 

Yards Passing 142 

Intercepted By 1 



Punts - Yardage 

Fumbles 

Own Fumbles Regained 
Penalties - Yards 



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Bales 

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Colby was their seventh in a 
row over Bates. The loss ended 
the season for the Bobcats and 
gave them a 2-5 record for the 
year. 



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S9 



Vol. XC, No. 9 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



By Subscription 



Minister Speaks On 
AlbanyExperience 

Sunday Evening: 6:30 



One of 75 clergymen who re- 
sponded to the call of Dr. Mar- 
tin Luther King to "bear witness 
to the prophetic faith of our 

Judeo - Christian tradition, to 
stand with the people of Albany 
(Georgia) as they strive for 
freedom," will speak in the Wo- 
men's Union this Sunday even- 
ing at 6:30 p. m. 

The Rev. John Papandrew, 
minister of the Unitarian-Uni- 
versalist Church in Portsmouth, 
N. H., is free on bail after hav- 
ing been arrested and jailed as a 
result of those Albany demon- 
strations of August, 1962. 

Papandrew is a member of the 
Executive Committee of the 
Portsmouth branch of the 
NAACP, the New Hampshire 
State Advisory Committee to the 
United States Commission on 
Civil Rights, and the Southern 
Christian Leadership Confer- 
ence. He also participated in last 
August's Washington March for 
Jobs and Freedom. 

Prior to assuming his duties 
at the Portsmouth church in 
1961, Papandrew was associate 
minister of the Community 
Church, New York, N. Y. 

All interested students are 
invited to attend. 



iscipline Talks 



Resume Friday; 
Physics Panel 

Fourth in the series, the Cen- 
tennial Academic Discipline Con- 
ference in Physics will be held 
here this Friday in the Women's 
Union. Featured on the panel 
are: Dr. George A. Kolstad '43, 
chapel speaker; Mr. Frederick 
Smyth '36; Mr. Norman Briggs 
'53; Dr. Robert F. Stetson '54; Dr. 
William Y. Stevens; and Dr. 
Hulsizer '40. 

Dr. Kolstad is the Assistant 
Director of Physics and Mathe- 
matics Program, Division of Re- 
search, of the Atomic Energy 
Commission. Mr. Smyth is the 
president of the Ailing-Lander 
Company.! Mr. Briggs is the 
Sub-department head of the 
Mitre Corporation. Dr. Stetson is 
connected with the Office of 
Aero-Space Research. Dr. Ste- 
vens is associated with Interna- 
tional Business Machines. Dr. 
Hulsizer is the head of the 
physics department at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

The conference will conform 
with the format observed in the 
previous meetings. The guests 
will lunch with the members of 
the Bates physics department 
and later will talk with inter- 
ested students in the Women's 
Union. 




^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 



The Spitz Projector Outlined Against the Planetarium 
Sunset, fourth floor, Carnegie. 

Planetarium Open To All 
Campus Sky - Watchers 



Stop the world! This is only 
one of the many feats that can 
be accomplished in the new 
planetarium in the Carnegie Sci- 
ence Building. The planetarium, 
installed this fall, is the only 
one of the kind in a liberal arts 
college in the state. 

Costing almost $16,000, the 
planetarium was partially fi- 
nanced by the National Science 
Foundation who granted half of 
the total cost to Bates. 

"It's a wonderfully superb 
teaching tool, I have no alibi for 
not teaching astronomy", said 
Dr. Karl S. Woodcock, professor 
of astronomy and physics. From 
the control console stopping the 
world is only a matter of turn- 



ing a dial. 

Some of the many things that 
can be done are: charting the 
position of any star in the hea- 
vens with a co-ordinate plotting 
system, controlling the motion 
of the inner planets, and the 
phases of the moon can be seen 
as it rotates around the sun. 
Also, the precession of the earth 
can be altered so that a repro- 
duction of the skies as they ap- 
peared at the time of the birth 
of Christ can be achieved. 

Dr. Woodcock has extended an 
invitation to the entire campus 
to visit the planetarium. If 
enough people are interested, 
showings in the planetarium 
will be arranged. 



Rob Players Dramatize 
Man's Inhumanity To Man 



A modern morality play de- 
signed to explore man's inhu- 
manity to man will comprise the 
first Rob Players Readers Plat- 
form. The theme of the play 
centers around where the fault 
lies when an injustice is done: 
in the individual, in the group, 
or in the society. 

The characters are all those 
who have, in their own minds, 
been put to death unjustly. 
Among them appear Joan of 
Arc; a Christian martyr; a boy 
who worked in the underground 
during the war and was execut- 
ed for it; a Negro murdered be- 

Frosh Elections 

Following are the final candi- 
dates in the Freshman Elections: 

PRESIDENT: Bryan Carlson, 
Richard Powers. TREASURER: 
Doug Greene, Nancy Heglund. 
VICE PRESIDENT: David 
Lloyd. W. Harry Marsden. SEC- 
RETARY: Martha Buzzell, Bar- 
bara Hill. 

STUDENT SENATE: (MEN) 
Peter B. Beekman, Jon G. Wil- 
ska; (WOMEN) Karen S. Kane, 
Catherine Southall. 



cause of his race; a serf who re- 
ceived the death penalty for 
stealing food to feed his starv- 
ing family; Judas; Christ; Fran- 
cesca da Rimini and Paolo, 
adulterous lovers whose feelings 
were strong enough to lead them 
to disregard the rules of socie- 
ty; and others executed for sim- 
ilar acts. The play raises the 
question of who should be ac- 
cused — did these people and 
their actions warrant execution. 

Admission to the Platform 
will be by Rob Players Season 
Ticket. These tickets will be on 
sale tonight in the Little Theater 
Box Office from 7:30 until 9:00 
for $3.50. The Season Ticket will 
admit its holder to the Readers' 
Platforms in addition to Henry 
V, Right You Are If You Think 
You Are, and the Rob Players 
film series. 

The idea of a Readers' Plat- 
form is experimental with Miss 
Schaeffer and the Players, al- 
though it is being done in many 
other colleges. The actors learn 
no lines, but read the entire 
play. Miss Schaeffer, a great be- 
liever in the oral interpretation 
method of presentation, is inter- 
ested in seeing what affect this 
means will have at Bates. 



Debate Team Wins 
Twelve; Loses Six 
At Maine Tourney 



The Bates Debating Team 
won twelve and lost six debates 
at the annual Maine Colleges 
Practice Debate Tournament last 
week-end at Colby. A three- 
round non-championship match, 
the Tourney is designed to pro- 
vide the Maine debaters with an 
opportunity to test out their 
cases before going out of state 
to bigger tourneys. 

There were six schools repre- 
sented — Bates with six two- 
man teams, Colby with four, 
Bowdoin with four, University 
of Maine with six, St. Francis 
with two, and the University of 
Maine at Portland with two, for 
a total of twenty-four two-man 
teams. The debate was set up on 
the basis of experience versus 
experience and novice versus 
novice. 

Two Bates teams went unde- 

TREAT EXHIBIT 

Throughout this month a 
special exhibition of archi- 
tectural designs, wood en- 
gravings and carvings, and 
oil paintings will be on dis- 
play in the Treat Gallery be- 
tween Pettigrew and the 
Little Theater. 
Featured in the exhibit is 
the work of William Thon of 
Port Clyde, Maine. Leo 
Meissmer, Charles Chase of 
Wiscasset, and Alonzo Har- 
riman. 

The Treat Gallery is open 
each day from 2 to 3 p.m. 



fcated for the day. The Bates B 
negative team of Richard Ros- 
enblatt '66 and Jeffrey Rouault 
'65 overcame the University of 
Maine. Bowdoin, and U. of 
Maine at Portland. The Bates 
C affirmative freshman team of 
Charlotte Singer '67 and Geof- 
frey Boyer '67 also came through 
with a 3-0 tally by defeating two 
U. of Maine teams and St. 
Francis '62. 

Two other teams finished with 
a 2-1 record. The Bates A af- 
firmative team of John Strass- 
burger '64 and Susan Stanley 
'64 defeated Colby and U. of 
Maine but lost to Bowdoin while 
the A negative team of Tom 
Hall '64 and Bob Ahern '64 over- 
came Colby and Bowdoin while 
losing to Maine. 

Meeting with some difficulties 
but still winning one were the 
B affirmative of Norman Bowie 
'64 and Max Steinheimer '66 de- 
feating Colby but losing to Maine 
and Bowdoin while the C nega- 
tive of Darill Shively '67 and 
Bob Cornell '67 won over U. of 
Maine and lost to Colby and St. 
Francis. 

This next weekend the A and 
B teams of Ahern, Hall, Strass- 
burger, Stanley, Bowie, Stein- 
heimer. Rosenblatt, and Rouault 
journey to the University of 
Vermont in Burlington for two 
days of debating with schools 
from Canada and western New 
York and Massachusetts. 



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A porlion of ihe special exhibit featured in the Treat 
Gallery throughout this month. 



(*0 

TWO 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



Tobey Finds Concert 
A Rewarding Dialogue 



By JOAN TOBEY '64 

The observer sits, waiting, 
hoping to hear some beautiful 
music. He is not disappointed as 
piece after piece goes on and the 
music is truly beautiful; it ex- 
cites, stimulates and amazes 
with its preciseness and quality 
of tone. 

This certainly happened when 
Leonard Rose, cellist, played at 
the Lewiston High School Audi- 
torium last Friday night. How- 
ever, there was very much more 
happening than beautiful music 
being played. This thought has 
something to do with a creative 
act occurring between the ob- 
server and the musicians, the 
cellist and the pianist, the musi- 
cians and their music, the musi- 
cians and the composer, the mu- 
sicians and their instruments, 
the observer and the composer 
and so on. As the concert pro- 
gressed, one could not help but 
be amazed at the continued, var- 
ied, textures brought to a full- 
ness in the sense of sound. 

Rose is an intense and moving 
cellist; his playing was beauti- 
ful during the whole concert. 
There are a few selections 
which should be mentioned in 
particular for their fine quali- 
ties. The first is the Adagio and 
Allegro in A major by Luigi 
Boccherini. Rose's use here of 
double stops (playing on two 
strings at once) was particularly 
delicate and effective. This piece 
required the use of high notes 
for a cello and as he played, one 
felt one watched a complete dia- 
logue between the musician and 
his instrument. 

The Sonata No. 2 in F major 
by Johannes Brahams began 
with an allegro vivace which 
Rose played powerfully and 
passionately. The use of the low- 
est note on a cello, the C two 
octaves below middle C, was 
beautiful to watch as well as to 
hear. Rose drew the bow com- 
pletely off the string and thrust 
the cello away from himself to 
let the string vibrate with a 
complete fulness of tone. This 
rumbling, growling silver string 
gave a good depth to the move- 
ment. 

The second movement was an 

Guidance 

INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Mr. Joel and Dr. Braun will 
interview men and women for 
teaching positions in the Bronx- 
ville (N. Y.) Public Schools on 
Friday, November 22. All inter- 
ested student teachers should 
contact Prof. Kendall, 303 Petti- 
grew. 

SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

THE NATIONAL SECURITY 
AGENCY announces the Profes- 
sional Qualification Test for col- 
lege seniors and graduate stu- 
dents. All academic majors are 
eligible. Registration deadline is 
November 22 for the test on De- 
cember 7 to be given at Colby. 
A test bulletin and more in- 
formation about career oppor- 
tunities are available at the 
Guidance and Placement Office. 
REMINDER TO SENIORS 

Seniors are reminded to com- 
plete their registration at the 
Placement Office and to pick up 
a College Placement A,nnual be- 
fore the limited supply is ex- 
hausted. 



adagio affetuoso beginning with 
pizzicato. This effect, unfortu- 
nately, was lost in the general 
noise of the audience as they set- 
tled down from their round of 
applause given after the first 
movement. Audiences are prob- 
ably the same everywhere in 
that they have to rustle pro- 
grams, cough, sneeze, shuffle, 
and come late; but please, let 
not the applause break the mu- 
sician's mood and sense of tim- 
ing. This movement and the 
next, an allegro passionato were 
both musically beautiful and 
technically precise. But it was 
in the last, an allegro molto, that 
a full singing melody returned; 
the use of clear double stops and 
of soft pizzicato was magnifi- 
ment. 

In this whole piece by Brahms, 
the spontaniety between Rose 
and the accompanist, Mr. Samuel 
Sanders was openly there. This 
was Sanders' first time accom- 
panying Rose. This in itself was 
a dialogue of the highest order. 
The split-second timing was un- 
believably fine. The sensitivity of 
Sanders and his response to the 
whole newness of the situation 
was a most beautiful act of 
creativity. This dialogue was 
one of the major themes of this 
concert. 

The last portions of the music 
were works by Tchaikovsky, C. 
Saint-Saens, Ibert, Hillemacher, 
and Chopin. The Swan by Saint- 
Saens was exquisite. The Intro- 
duction and Polonaise brillante 
by Chopin had a majestic quali- 
ty evidenced again by the tim- 
ing of pianist and cellist as well 
as the pizzicato chords. In 
response to the audience Rose 
played two encores: an Allegro 
Vivo by Francoeur and The Si- 
cilian by Faure. 

This concert was enjoyable; it 
is a great privilege to have the 
chance of developing one's 
senses towards a greater sensi- 
bility of such beauty. After 
such a performance, one cannot 
help but have new thoughts on 
the power of beauty: 
"Since brasse, nor stone, nor 
earth, nor boundless sea, 
but sad mortallity ore-swaies 

their power, 
How with this rage shall beautie 

hold a plea, 
Whose action is no stronger 
than a flower? . . . 

O none, unlesse this mira- 
cle have might . . ." 

Shakespeare 



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College Must Stress 
Training Of Intellect 



Each spring the senior class 
of Amherst College* selects a 
member of the faculty to deliver 
an address at Senior Chapel — 
the final gathering of the year 
at Amherst's Johnson Chapel. 
The speaker is invited to discuss 
any subject of his choice. 

Last spring, William E. Ken- 
nick, professor of philosophy, 
was elected. According to the 
Amherst Alumni News, Ken- 
nick's address was "a ringing 
criticism of his audience's at- 
titude toward education and 
raised more than a ripple of re- 
action from a number of 
sources." 

A dissenting editorial view in 
the Amherst student newspaper 
appeared, and a few weeks later 
the Minister to the College de- 
voted his Baccalaureate Sermon 
to the subject. That same even- 
ing. Justice Arthur Goldberg 
openly disagreed with Professor 
Kennick's thesis. 

These several views were 
presented in the Summer, 1963 
issue of the Amherst Alumni 
News under the heading, "In- 
tellectual Excellence, A Series of 
Papers on a Continuing Issue." 

Following are portions of Pro- 
fessor Kennick's address, edited 
from a reprint in the Cavalier 
Daily, University of Virginia: 

We approach that season of 
the year in which hallowed cus- 
tom dictates that we congratu- 
late ourselves on what a fine col- 
lege we are and how fortunate 
we are to be here. You have 
done me the honor of inviting 
me to address you this morn- 
ing; I will do you the honor of 
avoiding the great theme of 
self -congratulation. Each of us 
has his own idea of what Am- 
herst is and his own reasons for 
being thankful that he is here. 
I wish to discuss with you in- 
stead what Amherst is not, 
something for which none of 
us, I hope, has reason to be 
thankful. 

Huntington In 1871 

Speaking at the semi-centen- 
nial exercises of Amherst Col- 
lege in 1871, the Rt. Rev. 
Frederick D. Huntington of the 
class of 1839 described Amherst 
as "a college . . . not quite so 
far west as Williams, and not 
quite so far toward Plato as 
Cambridge." Plato was for 
Bishop Huntington, of course, a 
symbol of religious heterodoxy 
and apostasy, matters with 
which, thank God, we are, nine- 
ty-two years later, no longer 
seriously concerned. But Plato 
was at the same time a symbol 
of unambivalent and untram- 
melled intellectual dedication, 
and that, I trust, remains of 
concern to us. The College is 
still east of Williams, but, avoid- 
ing invidious comparisons with 
Harvard, how far has it moved, 
in ninety-two years, toward 
Plato? 

There are those who will say 
"Too far." Their reply, however, 
strikes me as not only false but 
paradoxical. As far as a college 
is removed from its proper con- 
cerns, it is no college at all. A 
college too close to Plato is thus 
like a religion too close to God. 
Whatever purposes a college or 
university may actually serve in 
society — and in the history of 
European and American educa- 



tion those purposes have been a 
varied lot — the one constant that 
has continued to distinguish it 
from a trade, technical, or pro- 
fessional school has been the 
quality of its dedication, not 
simply to the truth, which is the 
monopoly of none, nor even to 
intelligence, which is a requisite 
of all forms of inquiry, but to 
disinterested intellectual excel- 
lence. 

Intellect First 

"The intellect ... the intel- 
lect . . . the intellect," writes 
Noel Annan, Provost of King's 
College, Cambridge, in a recent 
issue of "Encounter." "That is 
what universities exist for. Ev- 
erything else is secondary. 
Equality of opportunity to come 
to the university is secondary. 
The need to mix classes, nation- 
alities, and races is secondary. 
The agonies and gaieties of stu- 
dent life are secondary. So are 
the rules, customs, pay, and pro- 
motion of the academic staff 
and their debates on changing 
the curricula or procuring facil- 
ities for research . . . All these 
are secondary to the cultivation, 
training, and exercise of the in- 
tellect." 

This does not mean, I take it, 
that other things are unimpor- 
tant; simply that in a college all 
other things are, or ought to be, 
secondary. There may be, doubt- 
less there are, more important 
things in life than things intel- 
lectual, but there can be no 
more important things in college 
life, whatever the misguided an- 
ticipations of the prospective stu- 
dent, the confused loyalties of 
the matriculated student, or the 
sentimental memories of the 
alumnus may dictate to the con- 
trary. 

The Ail-Around Man 

Opposed to this conception of 
college education is that voiced 
by the Rev. George Harris, sev- 
enth president of Amherst. "The 
educated man," said President 
Harris in 1906, "is the all-round 
man, the symmetrical man. The 
one-sided man is not liberally 
educated. The aim of a college 
is not to make scholars. The aim 
is to make broad, cultivated men, 
physically sound, intellectually 
awake, socially refined and gen- 
tlemanly, with appreciation of 
art, music, literature, and with 
sane, simple religion all in pro- 
portion — not athletes simply, 
not scholars simply, not dilet- 
tantes, not society men, not 
pietists, but all-round men." 

The metaphor of the all-round 
man calls many bizarre images 
to mind, but chiefly it suggests 
to me that all-round numeral, 
the cipher or zero, symbol of 
nothing. Be that as it may, I re- 
spectfully dissociate myself from 
President Harris's view: what- 
ever need the world may have 
for all-round men — and imag- 
ine, for a moment, a. world com- 
posed of them — it neither is 
nor can be the function of a lib- 
eral arts college to meet that 

need; a finishing school, perhaps, 
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but not a college. Of course it is 
not the function of a college 
simply to make scholars, but it 
is the function of a college to be 
a place where men can, for four 
years at least, know what it is 
to be a scholar. 

If the cultivation, training, 
and exercise of the intellect is 
the first and paramount value of 
a college, how is that value to 
be realized, and what are the 
obstacles to its full realization 
here? — for I submit that there 
are such obstacles here. 

Desire Necessary 

A first-rate college requires 
students of native talent and in- 
telligence, a learned and dedi- 
cated faculty, a stimulating cur- 
riculum, and adequate facilities 
for study and research. All these 
Amherst has. But these are not 
enough. The prime and mutual- 
ly related prerequisites, without 
which faculty, curriculum, and 
facilities of study are pointless 
or ineffective, are an unambival- 
ent will on your part to learn, 
think, and exercise your imagi- 
nations, and a social order the 
whole tenor and tone of which 
not merely permits, but encour- 
ages, rewards, and, if possible, 
demands, an exercise of that 
will. Long ago Plato pointed out 
in the Republic and Symposium 
that the life of intellect is not 
merely a function of intelligence 
but also of love; where the pas- 
sion to think and learn is absent 
or defective, the quality of such 
thought and learning as does 
take place is inferior and of lit- 
tle account. 

My own seven years' experi- 
ence at Amherst — and I believe 
the experience of my colleagues 
will bear me out in this — has 
convinced me that your funda- 
mental attitude toward and af- 
fection for the life of intellectu- 
al excellence is not what it 
should and could be. (Moreover, 
I think you know this as well as 
I do.) That something is wrong 
(Continued on page three) 

BERMUDA 

COLLEGE WEEK 




MARCH 22 APRIL 11 

'Everyday packed with action 
...new friends... fun! 



SUN.— Get acquainted dance. 
(Wear Bermudas!) MON.- 
College Day at the beach. Tal- 
bot Brothers Calypso, College 
Queen Contest, barbecue lunch. 
TUES.— Jazz session, Limbo 
contest, buffet lunch. WED. 
— Cruise to St. George, Steel 
Band entertainment, Gombey 
dancers, refreshments. 
TIIURS.-On your own: 
swim, shop, sightsee, sports. 
Fill. -College Week Revue - 
entertainment. Tennis finals. 



All these . . . and lots more 
complimentary activities! 

See your 
Campus Organizer now ! J 

The Bermuda Trade Development Board 
620 Fifth Awnue, New York. N.Y 10020 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



THREE 



Amherst Professor 

(Continued from page two) 
is revealed in countless ways. 
Among them, your casual atti- 
tude towards class preparation 
and attendance, your willingness 
simply to get by or to make a 
certain mark, your impatience 
with difficult authors and prob- 
lems, the miserable and incor- 
rigible slovenliness of your writ- 
ing, your almost catatonic un- 
responsiveness in class, your 
general contempt for detail and 
for getting things right, your in- 
cessant pleas for more time in 
which to complete assignments 
for which you have been given 
ample time, the superficiality of 
your reading, the vulgar ways in 
which you spend your leisure 
time, the Neanderthal quality of 
your conversation, and your 
penchant for treating your teach- 
ers as paid entertainers or do- 
mestic servants. Contrast with 
all this the interest and enthusi- 
asm which most of you show, 
and the perfection which some 
of you strive for, in athletics, 
say, and you can easily see what 
I mean. 

Dissatisfaction 

I am sanguine enough to be- 
lieve, however, that this is not a 
state of affairs which all, or even 
most, of you desire. Surely it 
was not this that you came here 
for! Some of you have been 
openly unhappy with this situa- 
tion; others have become re- 
signed to it; others have made 
themselves insensitive to it. Still 
others, of course, simply do not 
care. Evidence of dissatisfaction, 
however, continues to appear. 
The number of those who drop 
out or transfer is not large or 
alarming, but larger and more 
alarming is the number who en- 
tertain fantansies of dropping 
out or transferring and, mild as 
they are, there are your perpet- 
ual complaints about the curric- 
iculum and the marking system 
and your symptomatic pleas for 
closer student-faculty relations. 
(But have you ever asked your- 
selves why the faculty should 



EMPIRE pl 1°Tng! 




If I* M 

Springs 



want to have closer relations 
with you? Has it never surprised 
you that so many do?) 

The usual candidates for blame 
in this matter have been, sever- 
ally, American society at large, 
the faculty and its curriculum, 
the admissions policy, the frater- 
nities, and the students. Together 
they cover nearly all the ground. 
On no one of these, however, 
can the whole burden of respon- 
sibility be laid. 

Society at large has always 
been inimical or indifferent to, 
at best tolerant of, the existence 
of dedicated intellectual com- 
munities within it; yet it has not 
prevented the rise of such com- 
munities and has continued, 
despite its suspicions and for 
whatever wrong reasons, to send 
a substantial number of its sons 
and daughters to them. 

Faculty Not Perfect 

As for the faculty and the 
curriculum, it would be difficult 
to find anyone who holds that 
they are perfect and without 
blemish. By whatever criteria 
such things can reasonably be 
assessed, however, the Amherst 
faculty as a whole is excellent; 
its courses, for the most part, 
first-rate. And you have no idea 
how difficult it is to teach here. 
Not because the intellectual de- 
mands you place upon the facul- 
ty are so high, but because the 
energy and effort required to 
move you and overcome your 
resistance to rising to that level 
of interest and attainment of 
which you are natively capable 
is so great. It is a measure of the 
singular dedication of so many 
members of the faculty that 
they have not despaired, that 
they continue to try, where suc- 
cesses are few and chancy, dis- 
appointment the rule, to awak- 
en you to the best that is in you. 

Students Over-Taught 

This explains, as I see it, why 
the curriculum here is so de- 
manding and why, more than 
any other students in the coun- 
try, you are over-taught. From 
its experiences with honors 
work, reading courses, reading 
periods, and programs of inde- 
pendent study, the faculty has 
learned that when the goad is 
not applied, either nothing is 
accomplished or whatever is ac- 



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"Tarzan The 
Magnificent" 

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.— 

"A Gathering 

Of Eagles 

plus 

"Traitors" 



— Closed Wednesdays — I 

mm - — -,n , S 



ft ■ 



Lantern Room 
Bert's Drive-In 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 



i 



PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 
Continuous Fri. from 5 p. nwi; 

Sat. from 1 p. m. f 
Sun. from 3 p. m 



TARAS BULBA 

Tony Curtis 
Yul Brynner 

(Color, Panavision) 
* 



Beauty and 
The Beast" 

(Color) 

rhmmhhhbmmnmmnhII 



complished is disappointing in 
the extreme. What is not always 
realized, however, is that the 
more formal demands the cur- 
riculum makes, the more it 
tends to perpetuate precisely 
those habits of study and atti- 
tudes towards the life of thought 
and imagination which sustain 
the intellectual resistance those 
very demands were instituted to 
overcome. The result is a vicious 
circle from whom deadening 
round you tend to flee into mind- 
less diversions; we, into a life of 
clownish eccentricity, solipsistic 
privacy, or self-protective but 
soul destroying irony. 

How does one measure the ef- 
ficacy of an admissions policy, 
save by the intelligence, talent, 
industry, ambition, and imagina- 
tion of the students admitted as 
this can reliably be ascertained 
from the data available, i.e. by 
the quality of the freshmen on 
admission? Judged by this stan- 
dard, the admissions policy at 
Amherst is largely unexception- 
able. Freshmen here • are no 
worse than freshmen anywhere; 
indeed, as far as the capacities 
in question go, they are superior 
to the vast majority of fresh- 
men in the other colleges and 
universities of this country, or of 
any other country. This clearly 
suggests that something must 
happen to them at Amherst to 
produce the deplorable condition 
I have been talking about. 

No Cramming 

"How can pupils be taught to 
use their own minds?" asks Noel 
Annan. "How can they be per- 
suaded to renounce cramming 
and question spotting? How can 
all those who govern schools, 
colleges, and universities be 
made to acknowledge the exam- 
ination results are not an end 
but a comparatively unimport- 
ant by-product of education? 
How can students be persuaded 
to love learning for its own sake 
and not for the job that getting 
a degree may obtain them?" 

These are among the most im- 
portant questions that can be 
asked about education, but they 
rest on a mistake if they assume 
that the values in question can 
be achieved simply through 
teaching and persuasion. As a 
teacher I can hardly afford to 
underestimate the powers of 
teaching, but I am reminded by 
Aristotle that teaching alone 
"will no more produce health in 
the soul than a course in medi- 
cal theory will produce health 
in the body." And I am remind- 
ed by Plato that if men are re- 
sponsible for the quality of the 
communities in which they live, 
communities are responsible for 
the qualities of the men who live 
in them. 

As I see it, the general tone of 
undergraduate life at Amherst 
is inimical to the realization of 
the fullest and most exciting in- 
tellectual experience this college 
can offer. Although that tone is 
set by only a minority of the un- 
dergraduates, it is perpetuated 
by the institution as a whole. 
The minority is no more respon- 
sible for its misdeeds (of which 
it is largely unconscious any- 
way) than are those who, in 
one way or another, encourage 
and support it. Hence, if anyone 
is at fault, the whole college is 
at fault, which means that we 
are all at fault. 

Difficult Solution 

I have no simple solution to 
the difficulties which I have de- 
scribed. In fact, if what I have 
said is approximately correct, 
there are no simple solutions 



^ew voices 



By JOHN HOLT '64 



By JOHN HOLT '64 

Note: Pan, The Creative Vision, 
and the present volume are 
available at the bookstore. 

Baal Babylon, by Arrabal; Grove 
Press; 104 pp.; $1.75. 

Like many of the avant-garde 
writers of today, Fernando Arra- 
bal left his native country 
(Spain) for the cosmopolitan 
eity of intellectual freedom, 
Paris. An experimental writer of 
intense individuality, Arrabal is 
another in a long line of new 
voices that have sprung into the 
smoky spotlight of coffee-houses 
and bread-wine garrets, reading 
aloud their manuscripts that are 
in reaction to the chaos and sur- 
face existence of the 20th cen- 
tury. 

I can hear it now. "It was a 
time of fear and anxiety; it was 
a time of hope and despair; 
bombs and death, foreign aid and 
rebellion. And we here in the 
21st century wonder how the 
world survived. . . . Next week 
we will discuss the Goldwater 
era and how it is still . influenc- 
ing the course of world affairs." 

The confusion and twisted 
values of anarchist rebellion in 
Spain is the background of Baal 
Babylon, where war, sex, relig- 
ion, and decadence are all 
thrown together in one big pot 
and thoroughly mixed so that 
people pray to bombers and 
fight with prayer-beads. What it 
is like to grow up in such a per- 
verted environment is the sub- 
ject of Arrabal's first novel, and 
it makes you just a little sick, 
but maybe a little bit wiser to 

available. Institutional reforms 
on a number of fronts are the 
only thing that can bring us 
closer to the embodiment of 
those ideals for which colleges 
exist. But do we want to move 
closer to that realization of those 
ideals of which we are clearly 
capable? That is the first and 
most important question frankly 
to be faced, and it is a question 
which cannot be faced by the 
administration alone, or the fac- 
ulty alone, or the trustees alone, 
or the students and alumni 
alone. For better or for worse, 
we are all involved in this enter- 
prise together. 

Amherst, you may think, is 
already better than most col- 
leges and inferior to none. Even 
if that is true, it is beside the 
point. The point is whether Am- 
herst is all that at best it can be. 
If not, then the second point is 
whether we have the courage 
to make whatever changes shall 
prove necessary to make it bet- 
ter. 

Alumni Produced 

You may also wonder why I 
choose to bring this matter to 
your attention at this time. After 
all, you are about to graduate. 
What more, then, have you to 
do with the College? Well, Am- 
herst may or may not turn out 
liberally educated men, but one 
thing it does turn out — alumni. 
If you think that your connec- 
tion with this college is to be 
severed on Sunday, the 16th of 
June, you are mistaken. If any- 
thing, your interest in the Col- 
lege will grow, your attachment 
to it becomes stronger. If and as 
it does, I hope you will resist the 
temptation to sentimentalize the 
past and to seek to perpetuate a 
college that never existed. The 
greatest service you can render 



the psychology of the mind of a 
pubertal boy who is exposed to 
such unspeakable horrors. 

Arrabal composes his novel in 
short vignettes, where the mem- 
ory of the young boy is evoking 
episodes of his traumatic exper- 
iences that have been indelibly 
welded into his mind. The events 
do not even follow in chronolog- 
ical order; they emerge as frag- 
ments from the consciousness of 
a fourteen year old boy as he 
painfully recalls them. He ad- 
dresses his recollections to his 
mother, in the present tense. 

Father Substitute 

The central protagonist in the 
boy's life, "mama" is constantly 
trying to justify her existence to 
him, for his father, a Jewish 
anarchist, was executed by the 
Guardia Civil on the basis of his 
wife's testimony, and the stig- 
ma of this deed obsesses her so 
that she tries to erase all mem- 
ory of him. The boy's father sub- 
stitute consequently becomes 
three perverted females, his 
mother, aunt, and grandmother. 
The obvious effect of this situa- 
tion is confusion and misunder- 
standing, especially because of 
the abnormality of the women. 
He has to listen, as a husband- 
substitute, to his mother's la- 
menting, bigoted wail. 

"As a father, his first duty 
was to take care of his own 
family. It was his duty to 
side with order and modera- 
tion. But he went over to the 
other side: to the side of 
anarchy, to the side of dis- 
order. . . . How many times 
I told him he should give up 
his terrible ideas! He spoiled 
everything for the sake of 
his ideas. . . . You can't un- 
derstand that. You were only 
a child then. . . . My con- 
science is clear. I've done my 
duty as a mother and as a 
wife. . . . It's my fate to be 
a martyr." 

Perversion 

His aunt is an extreme case of 
perversion. She is a masochist 
who forces the boy to beat her 
with a belt; and she ". . . who 
knew the mysteries of the Ros- 
ary by heart," imbues in his 
mind the association of sex with 
guilt by torturing him. 

Another perversion in the 
novel is that of religious fana- 
ticism — always a delicate and 
frightening subject. The Spain of 
that time is intolerantly Roman 
Catholic, and the children are 
educated by empty words and 
ceremony. They don't understand 
what is going on, but hopelessly 
and mechanically do what they 
are told to do. 

". . . the mother superior 
shouted 'Hail Christ the 
King!' three times and we 
answered 'Amen' and knocked 
our stones together and rang 
our bells." 

The several themes of relig- 
ious hollowness, insecure family 
(Continued on page four) 

to Amherst is to encourage and 
support its efforts to make itself 
better. Whatever its faults, it 
has deserved your best, and your 
best is to help make it truly "the 
fairest college." 



PATRONIZE 
OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



Editorials 

| Today, Like All Days 

Remember this morning — if you are sincere. Remember 
it as a time that Bates College failed. Remember it as an 
hour, in which each of us accounted for our unwillingness 
"to grow in self-mastery and personal depth, to develop 
wider and deeper appreciation, to delight in the adventures 
of an intellectual curiosity." (Bates Catalogue, Plan of Edu- 
cation—Part I.) 

If you are not sincere, then this morning, and this two day 
colloquia will soon be forgotten. If Bates College is merely 
a means to an end, a four year period that becomes mean- 
ingful only in light of what happens after you graduate, then 
this morning, as are all mornings, is insignificant. 

On Student Committees 

In the fall of 1960 a corporate meeting of the studentry, 
similar to last week's discussion of the Faculty's coercive 
action, considered the then recent faculty decision to change 
Thanksgiving from a four to a one day holiday. At that time 
the students voted overwhelmingly for a four day vacation. 

Today, Bates College enjoys only Thanksgiving Day with 
no-cut days before and after the holiday. 

During the school year 1961-62, a student committee initi- 
ated an investigation of library hours at other colleges and 
the need of, Bates students for using Coram Library. One 
year ago, the upstairs study area in Coram became available 
daily from eight to eleven, and the library proper extended 
its hours of operation. 

In their letter to the immediate right, Messrs. Burrows, 
Derby, Gilman, and Jacobs criticize the Student Senate for 
its action at last week's all-campus meeting and at the Sen- 
ate's regular meeting the following evening. They close by 
hoping that the Chapel committee has not already reached 
its conclusion. 

Yet, these men, or any student for that matter, can insure 
the operation and fate of the Chapel Committee simply by 
becoming a member of that committee. The Student Senate 
explicitely has made this a student, not a Senate committee, 
in order that any interested student may join. 

We support the Senate's action in forming this committee, 
because we believe that it is through sustained committee ac- 
tion, and not merely by attending an all-campus meeting, 
that students can effect improvements in Bates College. 

That Messrs. Burrows, Derby, Gilman, and Jacobs are con- 
cerned about Bates College has already been evidenced by 
their speaking out in Chapel, their attendance at the Senate's 
regular meeting, and their letter in this issue. Whether or 
not they join the Chapel Committee remains to be seen. 

The Student Intellect 

While it is the policy of this newspaper to concentrate on 
campus events and to minimize reprints from other college 
newspapers, it is also the aim of the STUDENT to include 
relevant commentary on the events it reports. It is for this 
reason, that the partial text of an address by Professor Ken- 
nick of Amherst College appears on pages two and three of 
this issue. 

Professor Kennick's comments are directed to students of 
Amherst, but he does not fail to include the administration 
and alumni within his speech. The points he makes, and the 
criticism he offers, are especially relevant in light of the 
events of recent weeks, and the spirit of inquiry guiding our 
centennial celebration. 



Freshman Elections 

Each year at this time the Freshman Class elects its class 
officers and representatives to the Student Senate. 

This election provides a marked contrast to the all-campus 
elections which are held in the Spring, and to the recent 
special election of the members of the Student Senate. 

The present electoral system is a hobgoblin of various pro- 
cedures. In electing class officers, all the members of a class 
vote for their choice without regard to sex, but in electing 
Senators a woman can vote only for a woman, and a man 
only for a man. 

In electing the upper-class members of the Senate, all the 
men vote for the male senators, and all the women for the 
female senators. In electing the freshman representatives to 
the Senate, however, only the freshman can vote. 

In selecting the Senate President and Vice-President every- 
one votes for their choice. Yet, the other officers, the Treas- 
urer and Secretary are not elected, but selected by the mem- 
bers of the Senate. 

The STUDENT has long advocated a simplification of the 
entire system, by having every class elect its own represen- 
tatives via the same procedure as the freshman class. Eighty- 
six per cent of the freshman class voted last Monday, where- 
as only thirty-five per cent of the school voted in the recent 
Senate elections. Might the difference, at least in part, be 
attributable to the simplier and more intelligible electoral 
system? 



Letters To The Editor 



UNICEF 



To ihe Editor: 

I read Janet McEachern's ar- 
ticle on the UNICEF Christmas 
cards in your November 6 issue 
and was inspired to order a sup- 
ply of these greeting cards and 
notes so that they could be more 
easily available in the commun- 
ity. 

Under the auspices of the 
Lewiston-Auburn Peace Center, 
I will be selling the cards for 
the benefit of UNICEF. 

I would like to urge Bates 
students and faculty and staff to 
send these cards to their friends 
and relatives this year because 
of their double meaning. 

One box of ten cards and en- 
velopes costs only $1.25 and all 
the proceeds go to help under- 
privileged children by supplying 
food and medicine. 

There couldn't be a more 
meaningful Christmas greeting! 

If interested please call me at 
783-2728. f 
Sincerely, 
Mrs. John Tagliabue 



On The Student Senate 

To the Editor: 

We wish to call to the atten- 
tion of the entire student body 
the following statement taken 
from the minutes of the Student 
Senate meeting of November 12: 
"Steinheimer stated that the 
Senate . . . also has the right to 
make judgements of its own 
which it feels will be most just 
for all concerned." 

If the Student Senate feels 
compelled in its decisions (e.g. — 
Centennial Convocation protest) 
to seek solutions that will please 
both the administration and the 
faculty, who is there to repre- 
sent the students? The Student 
Senate must look out for the in- 
terests of the students. It must 
not take it upon itself to act in 
such a way as to compromise the 
wishes of the students, sacrific- 
ing their interests for the sake 
of preserving the status quo. 

By failing to bring to a vote 
such resolutions as the one call- 
ing for the students not to pass 
their tickets in at Centennial 
Convocation, the Student Senate 
has failed in its obligation to the 
student body. By passing judge- 
ment on the worth of student 
opinion and by not expressing 
student opinion the Senate has 
weakened the already weak po- 
sition of the student body. Re- 
luctance to take action means a 
continuation of the power vac- 
uum of which Dr. Chute speaks. 

In the light of the Senate's 
stand on Centennial Convoca- 
tion, one must look with appre- 
hension upon the committee be- 
ing formed to investigate com- 
pulsory chapel. One hopes that 
the conclusion the committee 
reaches in the future has not al- 
ready been reached in the minds 
of those responsible for its form- 
ation. 

Melvin Burrowes '66 
Richard Dfcrby '66 
Bernard Gilman '66 
David Jacobs '66 



TO OUR READERS 

We welcome letters from our 
readers. Any comments which do 
not exceed the bounds of good 
taste will be published. Any let- 
ter which is not published will 
be acknowledged. All letters 
must be signed. 



Sayonara! 
Dear Bates People: 

(including Professors, students, 
and everybody) 

Early in the morning of May 
15 1961, my boat arrived at Cal- 
ifornia; it seems like ages ago, 
and at the same time, it's like 
just yesterday. Now the day I 
leave for Europe is coming clos- 
er and closer. 

It's been such an enriching two 
and a half years with no regret. 
When I look back on all these 
days, I am at a loss for words 
how to thank you all — who 
made my days so rich and deep- 
ly satisfying. 

There are so many things I 
wish to say, but taking this 
chance, I would like to tell you 
one thing. If you have the 
chance to know people from 
other countries, or when you, 
yourself, are abroad, try to get 
to know them well. I firmly be- 
lieve that world peace is brought 
not through the hands of politi- 
cians but through the warm 
friendship we, individuals, make. 

I have been disappointed to 
find so many people so ignorant 
about Japan, particularly as my 
country is now. And, I know that 
there are many foreign people 
who condemn American students 
for being interested only in su- 
perficial pleasures. 

It is each one of you that can 
show the real, healthy America 
to the world. It is each one of 
the people from the other coun- 
tries that can show you their 
countries. 

Today, the progress of modern 
science makes it possible to go 
around the earth in less than 40 
hours. If only we — young peo- 
ple in the world — hold our 
hands together, we can have 
one, big bridge of friendship 
over the earth. We have to build 
it, for we are the only ones who 
can do it! 

I thank you all again. And, 
don't forget to call me up when 
you get to Haneda Air Port in 
Tokyo. (My telephone number — 
729-0204). Any time after Au- 
gust, 1965, I'll be there to pick 
you up. 

I apologize that I have been 
selfish to be more interested in 
knowing America for myself 
than to introduce Japan to you. 
I wish that from now on Bates 
will take advantage of having 
foreign students more, so that 
lazy one like me can be happily 
forced to do something. 

SAYONARA! 

Yoko Hirasawa '65 



Another Man's Poison 
To the Editor: 

After a rest of several months 
I re-visited Bates for a weekend. 
I found the usual beautiful de- 
cadence and delightful conserva- 
tive lost horizon that I left last 
semester after two years at this 
college. My eyes are dazzled by 
the new administration building 
— like a Greek temple it will 
stand there containing the om- 
nipotent Gods. 

But still I feel that Bates is 
laboring under the same old 
problem — there is no rebellion. 
A measure like the compulsory 
chapel attendance is foisted upon 
the studentry and they sit back 
and smile. They do not realize 
that the empty chapel at Dr. 
Paley's address is an adminis- 
tration failure, and not a student 
failure. The administration has 
failed to make Bates a stimulat- 
ing educational experience. . 

Bates is based upon extrinsic 
educational values — conse- 
quently marks are important — 
and nothing that is unrelated to 
marks will be of importance. 
Hence the V 4 empty chapel. And 
the administration has only it- 
self to blame. When coercion is 
used (even if there are two 
whole definitions), it shows that 
there is panic and failure. When 
Bates breaks down, it shows 
that the cancer is affecting the 
mind — the control — not em- 
anating originally from the body. 

In his oratory before the 
freshmen men, Dean Walter 
Boyce said that the four years at 
college are a molding period. 
(Mold has two whole definitions 
too.) So look around you. Do 
you want to be molded by a nar- 
row minded, conservative, and 
failing educational experience? I 
didn't — and I left. 

Malcolm Mills 

MEW VOICES 

(Continued from page three) 
relationships, and perverted sex 
are unified by certain consistent 
factors that are associated with 
them, namely, guilt, punishment, 
and fear. 

This is a depressing book. It is 
less a work of art than it is a 
document or case history written 
in short, intense bursts of con- 
trolled mania. The style, while 
not "la dolce stil nuova", is yet 
an experimental success. The 
subject, at least, is a critical 
one, and since it has a fearsome 
air of authenticity to it, the book 
merits attention. 



'Bates 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 u Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
'66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 

Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6601. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn. Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30. 1913. 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate " 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



*3 

FIVE 



Garnet Places Four Men 
On All-Maine Soccer Team 



The Maine State Series soccer 
coaches met last week to decide 
upon the first annual All-Maine 
Soccer Team. 

The first team was dominated 
by Bates players, as the Garnet 
contributed four to the list, Col- 
by three, Bowdoin two, and 
Maine two. 

Receiving top honors for 
Bates were Bob Thompson, last 
week's Bobcat of the Week, 



George Beebe, retiring Capt. 
Lloyd Bunten, and Dan Hagg- 
lund, who will not be with the 
Bates squad next year. 

On the second team Bowdoin 
led with four, Colby followed 
with three, and Bates and Bow- 
doin each had two selections. 

The final standings in the 
state competition found Colby 
the winner, followed by Bates, 
Bowdoin, and Maine. 



Position Name 


Class 


Home Town 


t/Ollege 




First Team 




Goalie 








Steven Clark 


Junior 


Hebron, Maine 


Maine 


Fullbacks 








Bob Thompson 


Sophomore 


W. Hartford, Conn. 


Bates 


Rufus Brown 


Sophomore 


Andover, Mass. 


Maine 


Halfbacks 






Bill Horton 


Senior 


Chatham, N. J. 


Bowdoin 


George Beebe 


Junior 


W. Hartford, Conn. 


Bates 


Jim Valhouli 


Senior 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Colby 


Forwards 








Lloyd Bunten 


Senior 


Clinton, Conn. 


Bates 


Hans Hede 


Sophomore 


Stockholm, Sweden 


Bowdoin 


Dan-Erik Hagglund 


Freshman 


Alusbyn, Sweden 


Bates 


Dave Kelley 


Junior 


Princeton, N. J. 


Colby 


Jean-Paul N'Joya 


Sophomore 


Cameroun, W. Africa 


Colby 




Second 


Team 




Goalie 








George Burns 


Junior 


Englewood, N. J. 


Colby 


Fullbacks 








Steve Codner 


Senior 


Newington, Conn. 


Bowdoin 


Bucky Smith 


Junior 


Cincinnati, O. 


Colby 


Halfbacks 








Steve Weiss 


Senior 


Jenkintown, Pa. 


Bowdoin 


John Engle 


Sophomore 


New York, N. Y. 


Colby 


Don Chase 


Junior 


Sharon, Mass. 


Maine 


Forwards 








Bob Lanz 


Junior 


Rockville, Conn. 


Bates 


Rick Copeland 


Senior 


Williamstown, Mass. 


Bowdoin 


Bruce Peterson 


Freshman 


Old Lyme, Conn. 


Bates 


Doug Best 


Junior 


Riverside, Conn. 


Maine 


Ray Bird 


Sophomore 


Reading, Mass. 


Bowdoin 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 
Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a.m.- 10 p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lC p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



By DAVE WHELEN '64 
Don King is vacationing again 
this week, so in his place I shall 
attempt to review the major 
highlights in this week's sports 
schedule. 

The "B" league off-campus 
"playboys" lost a heartbreaking 
18-12 decision to Roger Bill in 
the week's only intramural ac- 
tion. The only bright spot in an 
otherwise dismal afternoon was 
the superb passing of "Playboy" 
Steve Barron. Steve uncorked 
three touch down passes — un- 
fortunately one of these aerials 
fell into the outstretched arms 
of Roger Bill's Al Cruickshank 
who returned it all the way for 
the deciding score. 
Big Brown Boobo 

It seems quite clear that even 
the most diehard Brown fan 
must concede the Eastern Divi- 
sion championship to the power- 
ful Ginats. The Giants again put 
on an awesome display of of- 
fensive prowess as they easily 
disposed of the 49'ers 48-14. 
Y. A. Tittle, in spite of a poor 
start (1-8) still managed to 
throw four touchdown passes. 
These passes coupled with ex- 
cellent line play, especially on 
the part of Rosey Brown and 
Daryl Dess proved to be too 
much for the outclassed San 



W. A. A. News 

By MARCIA FLYNN 

Unfortunately due to the con- 
ditions of the hockey field, the 
playday scheduled for last Sat- 
urday had to be cancelled. But 
it is hoped that there will be 
much more success with the im- 
pending intramural volleybeall 
season. This Friday, the annual 
WAA Board vs. the Proctor 
Council game will be held (I'll 
be taking bets on that game!). 
This game will kick-off the vol- 
leyball season, so let's try for 
good attendance this year. Sign- 
up sheets for those interested in 
playing have been placed in all 
dorms, so let's try for good dorm 
participation. If we see some 
good playing, possibly there can 
be some challenges afforded to 
the men's side of campus. It's up 
to you! 



THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main St. Lewiston 

Next to Bus Terminal 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. at Bates St. 

Tel. 783-2011 



BED ARD'S 
MAINE'S ONLY 
DRIVE-IN PHARMACY 
Phone 4-7521 Lewiston, Maine 
Cor. College and Sabaitus Sts. 



TV RENTALS - SALES 
Free Delivery 
BATES ELECTRONICS 
783-2269 
783-0608 



JERRY'S VARIETY 

203 College Street 

ICE CREAM and CANDY 
Of All Kinds 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 




50 Lisbon Street Dial 784-5241 



TURGEON'S 

PRESCRIPTION 
PHARMACY 

A Turgeon, Reg. Ph. 

392 Lisbon St. Lewiston, Me. 

Tel. 783-1486 

ZENITH HEARING AIDS 

BATTERIES AND 

ACCESSORIES 

FOR ALL MAKES 



NAULT'S 
Hospital Square 

ESSO SERVICENTER 
Dial 782-9170 
305 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

Lubrication ■ Washing 
Tire Repair - Anii-Freexe 



Franciscans. 

With the intramural football 
season drawing to a close, all at- 
tention is focused on the up- 
coming basketball season. Art 
"Zeus" Agnos is priming his off- 
campus boys for the season's 
opener. In an informal game 
last Saturday, Agnos showed 
that despite his age, he can still 
show the younger guys a few 
moves. Jim Wallach, after an un- 
eventful football career, showed 
fading glimpses of greatness in 
this game and could be a key 



man for the Off-Campus team. 

It's Never Too Late 

It is with great pleasure that 
I announce the intramural man 
of the week — Don King. Don's 
modesty in refusing to bestow 
this honor on himself is sur- 
passed only by the loyalty with 
which he serves his community. 
In future years, Don will have a 
place in the annals of history as 
one of the all time great hacks. 
Don will be among such immor- 
tals as Buzzy Furman, Mike 
Giacovoni and others. 



TEAM STATISTICS 



M I A A FOOTBALL STATISTICS — 

INDIVIDUAL RUSHING 
Players 

Carr 

Yuskis 

Planchon 
MacNevin 
Lanza 
Bales 
Mossman 
Stone 
Williams 



Bates 


Opponents 


70 


First Downs 


115 


972 


Rushing Yardage 


1306 


399 


Passing Yardage 


800 


1301 


Total Yardage 


2079 


185.9 


Ave. Yds. per Game 


297 


90 


Passes Att. 


112 


30 


Passes Comp. 


59 


11 


Had Intc. 


' 4 


40 


Punts 


32 


32.7 


Punting Avg. 


32.6 


18 


Fumbles 


19 


12 


Fumbles Lost 


10 


38 


Penalties 


49 


374 


Yds. Penalized 


436 



INDIVIDUAL PASSING 



Player 



MacNevin 


62 


24 


8 


253 


Planchon 


3 


0 


0 


0 


Bales 


24 


9 


4 


132 


Yuskis 


1 


1 


0 


14 



Player 

Carr 
Yuskis 
Planchon 
Pangburn 
Paris 



TD 

6 
2 
0 
0 
0 



Player 

Planchon 
Pangburn 
Leblanc 
IND'V'L 
Player 
Planchon 
Donovan 
Lanza 
Bales 
Yuskis 
Carr 

Mossman 
M. Carr 
Callahan 
MacNevin 

SCORING 
PAT Kick PAT Rush 



Att. Comp. Intc. Gain 



Carries 


Net 


Avg. 


185 


470 


2.5 


67 


323 


4.8 


44 


173 


3.9 


19 


-41 




3 


7 


2.5 


13 


14 


1.1 


2 


-1 




1 


8 


8 


1 


-3 




PUNTING 




Punts 


Yds. 


Avg. 


33 


1117 


33.9 


1 


59 


50 


4 


142 


35.5 



PASS RECEIVING 



Caught 

5 
3 
1 
1 
6 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 



Gained 

75 
45 
10 
9 
57 
21 
43 
54 
12 
14 



PAT Pass FG PT 



0 
0 
0 

1 

2 



Bates 

6 

6 
13 
14 

0 

7 

7 



RECORD TO DATE 



0 
0 
0 
0 
0 

WON 2 



Norwich 

Northeastern 

W. P. I. 

Middlebury 

University of Maine 

Bowdoin 

Colby 



0 
0 
1 
0 
0 

- LOST 5 
Opponent 

34 
41 

0 

9 
49 
14 

8 



0 
0 
0 
0 
0 



32 
12 
2 
1 
2 

Att. 

2000 

1500 
4800 



First-Manuiacturers 
National Bank 

of Lewiston and Auburn 

CONVENIENTLY 
LOCATED 
jf or Bates Students at 
456 SABATTUS ST. 

Member F.D.I. C. 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

Phones in Rooms 
- Free TV ■ 

Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 
Auburn, Maine 
Dial 783-2044 



- - HAY RIDE PARTIES - - 



DANCING, TOO 



OLD SAND FARM 

DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 





CHUCK WAGON 

^ Drrve Ifv-R^istourorrt 



720 

Sabattiu 81 
O** Dmiij 11:06 AM. to 1:00 AM. 




(*4 

SIX 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 



Fall Sports Banquet Makes Awards 

Planchon, Ritter Get Goddard 
Awards For High Achievement 




With NICK BASBANES 

We salute ihis week a group of young men unique in their 
initiative. I am of course referring to the "un-namables", 
that group of individuals presently forming a hockey club. 
We are very happy to witness this spark of enthusiasm, as it 
gives those men proficient in the game an opportunity to pur- 
sue their talents where they would otherwise be unable to do 
so. For hockey as a team or club is unavailable and imprac- 
tical at Bates. A small school like ours is unable to field a 
large number of athletic teams. And hockey happens to be 
one which necessity leaves out. But the fact that the school 
can't provide the activity doesn't mean that those wishing to 
play shouldn't. It is in this regard that we congratulate this 
step. 

The club is forming under the supervision of John Lund, 
and he reports that over twenty men have signed already. 
They will play weekly at the Central Maine Youth Center's 
fine hockey rink, and they hope to compete in a local league. 
We wish them the best of luck and will be watching for their 
success. 

As is usual for ihis time of year the realm of athletic ac- 
tivity is in a state of limbo (on the collegiate level, I mean). 
For these next few weeks the spectators have to get ready for 
the transition from outdoors to indoors. With attention be^ 
ing focused on the basketball campaign, the State Series will 
this year evidence a minor change. Instead of each team 
playing each other three times, as it has been in previous 
years, they will meet only twice. This removes the presence 
of a rubber game in the event that two teams split. 

With reference to track, our cagers look fine in workouts. 
Coach Slovenski reports that this year should evidence one 
of Bates' best teams (and we have had some very good ones). 
Weakness lies as usual in the old nemesis, the weights. But 
added depth in the running phase promises to enhance even 
more the Garnet prospects. 

Next week the STUDENT will present its annual choice 
of an All-Maine football team. The selection is one inde- 
pendent of the more official ones. However, we usually do 
end up somewhat similar. 

Congratulations are in line for freshman Karl McKusick, 
twice Bobcat of the Week. The 17 year old frosh captured 
the final jewel of a cross-country triple crown Monday by 
taking the IC4A title in New York. Karl beat John Gallo- 
way of Wesleyan by a big margin in taking the three mile 
contest in the time of 15:38 over the Van Cortlandt Park 
course. Galloway was twelve seconds behind. The time set 
a new course record for the event. Karl thus ends his fine 
season with wins in the Easterns and the New Englands. His 
only loss of the season was to Sumner Brown of M.I.T. 

LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewislon 
Opp. the Mart 




By DON DELMORE '64 
The fall sports varsity dinner was held in Commons last Wednesday to honor football, 
soccer, and cross country participants. Highlighting the evening were the announcements 
of captains for next season and the recipients of the coveted Goddard Achievement Tro- 
phies. The Goddard honors are determined by the football coaching staff for admirable 
qualities in football and citizenship as well as for team value. 

In squad elections held prior* 
to the banquet, junior Steve 
Ritter was chosen as captain for 
the '64 football campaign. Steve 
was also honored as a recipient 
of the Goddard trophy as the 
outstanding Bobcat lineman. Se- 
nior captain Bill Planchon re- 
ceived the achievement trophy 
as outstanding back of the sea- 
son. 

Lanz Soccer Leader 

The 'Cats' successful soccer 
team elected high-scoring junior 
Bob Lanz to lead them next year. 
Sophomore Ken Trufant was 
cross country captain-elect. 

Senior varsity honor recogni- 
tion went to twelve members of 
the class of 1964. Jackets and 
certificates were given to Pat 
Donovan, Bill Graham, Paul 
Planchon, John Schatz, Dan 
Stockwell, Dave Stockwell and 
Manager Steve Talbot, in foot- 
ball; Steve Barron, Lloyd Bun- 
ten, and Carl Lloyd, in soccer; 
and Eric Silverberg and Finn 
Wilhelmsen in cross country. 
Requirements for the award are 
three consecutive years of par- 
ticipation, two varsity letters, 
and team spirit. 

The three outgoing captains 
each took a shot at the toast- 
master's chores. Soccer captain 



Louis P. Nolin 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



I J ?. % 

J/' 



Head Coach Hatch poses with Goddard football trophy 
winners Ritter and Planchon 



Lloyd Bunten introduced color- 
ful new coach Roy Sigler. Paul 
Planchon faced the task of intro- 
ducing varsity headcoach Bob 
Hatch, and Eric Silverberg 

called the popular Chick Leahey 
to the mike, subbing for the ab- 
sent Walt Slovenski. 

FB Letters 

Football letters were distrib- 
uted to the following: Randy 
Bales, Mark Berry, Jim Calla- 
han, Mike Carr, Tom Carr, Ed 
Davis, Pat Donovan, Bill Far- 
rington, Grant Farquhar, Bill 
Goodlatte, Bill Graham, Gerry 
Ireland, Carl Johnannesen, Arch- 
ie Lanza, Charles Lockhart, Bill 
MacNevin, Harry Mossman, Pe- 
ter Pequiqnot, Captain Paul 
Planchon, Dave Piasecki, Jim 

On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
side Auburn, Half Mile from 
Turnpike Exit No. 12 . . Phone 
783-1488 . . . Room Phone 

STARDUST MOTEL 

Exclusive But Not Expensive 



D eW I T T 
MOTOR 
HOTEL 

40 Pine Street 

Catering to 
INDIVIDUAL AND 
GROUP PARTIES 
Sunday and Holiday Dinners 
A Gormet's Delight 



WARD'S TV Inc. 
COLOR and BLACK and WHITE 



Complete Line of 
Transistor Radios and Stereos 



288 Lisbon St., Lew. 



782-3711 



Complete FLORIST Service 

DUBE'S 
Flower Shop, Inc. 

Roger and Regina LaBrecque 
195 Lisbon Street Dial 784-4587 Lewiston 

— FLOWERS WIRED WORLD WIDE — 



t>—V 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
Dial 784-8165 Nights 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
Lowest Prices in Town 

TURCOTTE'S 
GARAGE 

Lewiston's Only Radio Dispatch 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabaitus St. Lewiston 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE at 

ADVANCE AUTO SALES, INC. 

24 FRANKLIN STREET AUBURN, MAINE 

Dial 784-5775 or 782-2686 

VALIANT-PLYMOUTH CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL 
5-Year and 50,000 Mile Guarantee 

. — GUARANTEED USED CARS — 
Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates -Affiliated People 



Quinn, Steve Ritter, John 
Schatz, Ron Stead, Dan Stock- 
well, Dave Stockwell, Mike Tra- 
verso, Jack Williams, John Yus- 
kis, and managers Steve Talbot 
and Tony DiAngelis. 

Soccer letters were received 
by. Steve Barron, George Beebe, 
Captain Lloyd Bunten, Dan- 
Erik Hagglund, Mike Hine, 
Mark Hennesey, Bob Kramer, 
Bob Lanz, Carl Lloyd, Gary Lia, 
Wyland Leadbetter, Jim Onye- 
melukwe, Bruce Peterson, John 
Recchia, Bob Thompson, Ed 
Wells, and manager Jeff Roualt. 

CC Winners 

Cross country letters went to: 
Karl McKusick, Basil Richard- 
son, captain Eric Silverberg, 
Paul Swensen, Ken Trufant and 
Finn Wilhelmsen. 



SAM'S 
Esso Servicenter 

534 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

To All Bates Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment, 
Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 
Service 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 



JEWELER 



73 Lisbon St. 



Lewiston 



i 



1 



Hates 




Student 



dr5" 



Vol. XC, No. 10 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



By Subscription 



Outing Club Able To 
Go Ahead With Plans 
For Winter Carnival 

Owing to the wholehearted 
support and cooperation of the 
student body, 1 the goal of $1300 
worth of advance ticket sales set 
by the Extra-Curricular Com- 
mittee was reached by the dead- 
line of November 20. That sum 
was set by the committee as a 
guarantee that the Outing Club 
would be solvent when it had to 
pay the $1500 for the entertain- 
ment. Any money excedding the 
amount of $1500 will be applied 
to the cost of the entire Carnival. 

It should be noted that the en- 
tertainment represents only one 
of the many activities which the 
Outing Club is planning to pre- 
sent to the campus during this 
year's Winter Carnival. 

The chairmen of the commit- 
tees for the "Crystal Palace" 
are as follows: 
Refreshments — Kathy Pease 
Ski trip — Newt Clark, Linda 

Corkum 
Hockey game — Al Pethick 
Ski show — Marion Maynard, 

Al Skogsberg 
Entertainment — Nina Jewell 
Courtesies — Doug Findlay 
Publicity — Irwin Flashman, 

Penny Barbour 
Dance — Sally Utz, Carol Sue 

Stutzman 
Opening Night — Scott Wilkins, 

Paul Ketchum 
Anyone wishing to work on any 
of these committees should see 
the chairman. 

The crowning of the Carnival 
queen will take place Thursday 
night. There will be an all day 
ski trip Friday, followed in the 
evening by informal entertain- 
ment. Saturday the campus will 
be entertained by a ski show, a 
hockey game, a banquet in the 
evening, and a semi-formal 
dance — the Crystal Ball. Chap- 
el will be held Sunday morning 
and there will be entertainment 
Sunday afternoon. 

Tickets for the entertainment 
will be sold after Christmas va- 
cation along with the regular 
Carnival tickets. 




The Literature and Journalism Panel 



Distinguished Speakers 
Discuss Role Of Individual 



Colloquia concerning major 
academic disciplines and featur- 
ing distinguished speakers were 
presented last week in conjunc- 
tion with the Centennial cele- 
bration. The purpose of the six 
colloquia was to discuss "the 
role of the individual in the 
pursuit and use of knowledge." 

In the words of President 
Phillips the central aim of the 
colloquim was "to bring together 
the campus community and 
friends and a group of stimulat- 
ing guests from varying profes- 
sions to discuss the status of the 
individual — be he artist, scien- 
tist, businessman, or educator." 

Physical and Biological Sci- 
ences were the topic of the first 
symposium, featuring Sumner T. 
Pike, Chester Scott Keefer, Kirt- 
ley F. Mather, Harlow Shapley, 
and William Webster. Dr. Kee- 
fer stated his appreciation of the 
role the humanities have played 
on science. He went on to say 
that the two should never be in 
conflict. Every advance in sci- 
ence and technology benefits all 
mankind, and promoted the gen- 



Kolstad Speaks: Stresses Need 
For An Increased Awareness 



Dr. George A. Kolstad spoke 
on the need for specialization 
and perspective in Chapel last 
Friday. Dr. Kolstad represented 
the Atomic Energy Commission. 

In his speech, Dr. Kolstad 
stressed the advances in science 
and technology that have been 
brought about by specialization. 
He cited the numerous discover- 
ies that have been made within 
the last twenty years concerning 
the fundamental particles of the 
atom. 

While stressing scientific ad- 
vancement, he warned against 
over - specialization. "Granting 
that specialization is necessary 
as a means, does not imply that 
it is an end." A person must 
have a general teaching — not 
just a disciplining of "limited" 
knowledge — in order to become 
well-rounded. 

In today's rapidly advancing 
world there is too great a ten- 



dency for men to know more 
and more about less and less. 
Dr. Kolstad said that the main 
problem of our colleges and uni- 
versities is bring science to the 
non-scientist so that he could 
develop his scope and increase 
his perspective. 



Calendar 

Wednesday. Nov. 27 

"Ghost Goes West," Rob Play- 
ers Movie at 7 and 9 p.m. 

Thursday, Nov. 28 
Art Exhibit, 108 Hathorn 

Saturday, Nov. 30 
Wedding in Chapel at 1:00 

p. m. 

CHDC dance from 8-11:45 

Monday, Dec. 2 
Basketball at Colby 
Oratorical Contest, Little Thea- 
ter at 7 p. m. 



eral welfare of the people. 

Dr. Kirtley Mather concurred 
with Keefer and added that sci- 
ence is a servant of mankind 
and without one there could not 
be the other. 

Dr. Shapley said that to many 
the sciences seem uncultured, 
and that all scientists are con- 
cerned with their own limited 
field of work. He said that this 
popular conception is untrue. If 
the sciences were apart from 
human culture, they would not 
be able to benefit mankind. 

Man Guides World 

Mr. Webster stated that man 
was the guiding force behind 
the world and that man should 
live in a world in which the sci- 
ences and humanities are in con- 
junction. 

Milton D, Proctor, John L. 
Miller, Dorothy C. Stratton, 
(Continued on page six) 



Campus Stunned By 
Presidents Death 

The members of Bates College were stunned by the tragic 
death of President Kennedy. Until late Monday, students 
clustered around radios and television sets to listen to reports 

~ *and comments on events since 
'the President's assassination. 

Classes were dismissed and 
students wandered incredu- 
lously on Friday afternoon. 
That evening they packed the 
Chapel for a brief memorial 
service and heard President 
Phillips say that the nation 
has lost a great man and an 
irreplaceable leader. 

Saturday afternoon, stu- 
dents and faculty members 
met with President Phillips, 
and Sunday evening, the fac- 
ulty unanimously endorsed 
Bates' participation in Mon- 
day's National Day of 
Mourning. 

Sunday evening, students 
overfilled the Chapel to hear 
Dean Healy announce that all 
activities, except for meal 
service and minimal mainte- 
nance, would be suspended 
on Monday. 'The Chapel will 
be open all day," Healy said, 
"for each of you to give rev- 
erance as you see fit." 



Contest Stresses 
Clear Speaking 

The opportunity for "students 
interested in increased profi- 
ciency in speech" to gain exper- 
ience in public speaking is the 
purpose of the annual Bates 

Oratorical Contest to be held 
December 2. 

Held under the directorship of 
Prof. Brooks Quimby, head of 
the speech department, and La- 
vinia M. Schaeffer, associate 
professor of speech, the contest 
is designed to test the competi- 
tor's ability to communicate to 
any audience, lay or expert. He 
must communicate clearly and 
persuasively. The speech will be 
judged on this basis and on its 
effectiveness in terms of the au- 
idence. 

The speeches, each lasting ap- 
proximately ten minutes and 
covering a subject of general 
interest are presented twice to 
two panels of judges. The four 
or five finalists, winners of last 
Tuesday's preliminaries, will 
compete for the first, second, 
and third place prizes of 40, 25, 
and 15 dollars respectively. 

Two men from Lewistort and 
Prof. Quimby will judge the fi- 
nals to be held December 2 at 
7:00 in the Little Theater. The 
public is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



Bates Debaters Near Top 
At Invitational Tourney 



The Bates debaters had an- 
other successful weekend with a 
record of fifteen wins and five 
losses at the Vermont Invita- 
tional Tourney. No winner is de- 
termined at this tourney, but the 
Bates record was one of the best 
among the one hundred and 
forty-two teams competing from 
as far west as Michigan and as 
far north as McGill. 

Bates had two varsity units 
participating. The Bates unit 
won nine of its ten debates and 
will represent Bates in the East- 
ern Intercollegiate tourney in 
New Jersey in December. This 
group is the defending cham- 
pionship team in that event. 

The Bates teams were accom- 
panied by Professor Quimby 
and Mr. J. Weston Walsh who 
acted as critics. 

Pairing in the tourney are by 
lot and of course no school can 
meet all of the others present. 
However, Bates met some of the 
teams which are reputed to be 
the strongest this year, which 
made the showing the more sat- 
isfactory. 



The Bates A affirmative won 
from Syracuse, Temple, McGill 
and Southern Connecticut and 
lost to Brandeis. This team was 
composed of John Strassburger 
'64 and Susan Stanley '64. The 
Bates A negative of Tom Hall 
'64 and Robert Ahern '64 was 
undefeated, winning from Wil- 
liams, New Hampshire, MIT, 
Trinity and New York Univer- 
sity. 

The Bates B affirmative of 
Norman Bowie '64 and Max 
Steinheimer '66 won from Nor- 
wich and New York University 
(Heights) and lost to Buffalo, 
Massachusetts and Rutgers. The 
Bates B negative of Richard 
Rosenblatt '66 and Jeffrey Rou- 
ault '65 won from Harvard, 
Brooklyn, West Point and Saint 
Lawrence and lost to Dartmouth 
A, 



i, -j i doctrines of Segregationists 

Individual honors were widely 



distributed with nearly all of 
the Bates debaters being award- 
ed first place in at least one de 



Minister Doesn't Find 
Assassination Bizarre; 
Part Of Daily Strife 

"The assassination of President 
Kennedy does not represent a 
bizarre or incredible event. I am 
amazed at the shock and disbe- 
lief of the American people," 
said Reverend John Papandrew 
last Sunday evening in the Wo- 
men's Union. 

To members of civil rights 
movements, the President's as- 
sasination was another outburst 
of the violence and chaos which 
surrounds the American public. 
The death of the President 
evoked an immediate and per- 
sonal response in every Ameri- 
can citizen. 

Civil rights movements have 
tried to elicit a similar response 
and concern, but have been able 
to engender only momentary 
superficial interest. "Those who 
have not seen the violence," said 
Reverend Papendrew, "have not 
been looking." 

The American public has long 
been willing to acknowledge the 
reality of violence outside the 
boundaries of the United States. 
Americans have failed to per- 
ceive that there is no difference 
in the basic attitudes and values 
which underlie both the Nazi 
policy of Anti-Semitism and the 



America now faces a crucial 
moment in its history. People of 
the nation must decide whether 



bate with teammates alternating expediency should continue to 
for the honor in most cases. take precedence over principle. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



Sophs Revive 
Old-Time Spirit 

The general feeling around 
Bates is that class spirit never 
dies, it just fades away. The 
Class of '66 has broken this 
rather sad tradition. It continues 
to amaze the student body. The 
Colby rally provides an excellent 
example of what this class can 
do on a tight budget. But cash 
isn't the vital element here. 
What really counts is the origi- 
nality in planning and the 

strength to back up these "off- 
beat" plans. 

At this time the sophomore 
class is planning what will be 
one of the most pleasurable fes- 
tivities of the Christmas season. 
This will take the form of a 
semi-formal dance to be held in 
Chase Hall on the evening of 
December 7. The theme of the 
dance will be "Old-Fashioned 
Christmas." 

The Decoration Committee is 
working on a festive atmosphere, 
complete with a crackling fire, 
candlelight and mistletoe. The 
Entertainment Committee has 
arranged for the Harvard sing- 
ing group to provide a bit of 
harmonizing. 

The committee chairmen are: 
Decoration, Judy Dietz and 
Laura Hoyt; Band and Enter- 
tainment, Alice Kaplan; Refresh- 
ments, Jodi Lajaunie; Tickets, 
Paul Bertocci and Dick Rosen- 
blatt; and Publicity, Chris Car- 
ter. These people are working 
under the direction of the class 
officers. 

Tickets for the evening will be 
on sale soon. Hope you can join 
the fun. 



Rob Players To Present 
'Stage Struck' Extract 

Stage Struck, the musical story 
of a star's rise to fame, will be 
the feature presentation at the 
Robinson Players monthly meet- 
ing to be held next Tuesday at 
7:00 p.m. in the Little Theater. 
The sung narrative will include 
as song and dance numbers, "I'll 
Get By," "Melancholy Baby," 
"You Took Advantage of Me," 
"Black Bottom," and "Swanee." 
The play also employs the flash- 
back technique. 

Leading the cast will be Nan- 
cy Dillman and Mary Stuart, ac- 
companied by Judy Johnson and 
Sally Myers. Mary Ellen Keenan 
will head choreography. Other 
members of the cast will be Judy 
Harnden, Al Harvie, Cathy Ly- 
saght, Clancy Lowenberg. The 
presentation will be directed by 
Nancy Dillman. 

Admission will be by Rob 
Players membership card. Non- 
members will be charged $.25. 
Reminder 

Season tickets are available. 



Exchange With 
Southern School 

The opportunity seldom arises 
for an individual or a college 
community to overcome the re- 
gional and cultural isolation 
that exists between the northern 
and southern sections of our 
country. The physical handicap 
of distance makes it difficult for 
true understanding and emphat- 
ic involvement in the problems 
of each area. 

Having recognized the need to 
overcome this barrier, a group of 
Bates students have organized 
a Student Exchange Committee 
that is now making plans for a 
reciprocal one week spring ex- 
change with Clark College. 
Clark is a small co-educational 
Negro college in Atlanta, Geor- 
gia. 

Briefly outlined, this exchange 
will involve the transfer of a 
small group of students and 
possibly a faculty member be- 
tween Bates and Clark. 

Anyone interested contact Cliff 
Goodall '65. 



Guidance 



INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Monday, December 2, repre- 
sentatives from the UNITED 
STATES CIVIL SERVICE will 
be in Lower Chase Hall to in- 
terview men and women inter- 
ested in Management and Spec- 
ialized Training Opportunities in 
Federal Government Agencies. 

Wednesday, December 4, Mr. 
William T. Heisler from the 
PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE 
BLIND (and Boston University 
School of Education) will inter- 
view men and women interested 
in Graduate Study in Special 
Education (Scholarships). There 
will be a group meeting at 2:00 
p. m. in the Filene Room and in- 
dividual appointments following 
if desired. 

Thursday, December 5, Mr. 
Douglas R. Brown will interview 
men and women (juniors and 
seniors) interested in the COR- 
NELL UNIVERSITY GRADU- 
ATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRA- 
TION. 

Also on December 5, Mr. 



John T. Ryan from the U.S. 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
(Immigration and Naturalization 
Service) will meet with any 
men interested in Federal Ser- 
vice Career Opportunities (en- 
try position: Immigration Patrol 
Inspector) . 

Any student interested in the 
above interviews should sign 
up immediately at the Guidance 
and Placement Office. 
COMING EXAMS 

Seniors are reminded that the 
Peace Corps test will be given 
on Saturday, December 7, 8:30 
a.m. at the Lewiston Post Of- 
fice. 

The Massachusetts Civil Ser- 
vice examination for social 
workers in the Division of Child 
Guardianship will be given on 
December 28, 1963 at designat- 
ed areas. The late date for filing 
applications is Monday, Decem- 
ber 9. 

The Placement Office has in- 
formation available to anyone 
interested in a career as a Hall- 
mark Cards salesman. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: PETE BERTSCHMANN 



i 



r 



TEXACO HEATING OILS 

JIMMY'S 

GAS STATIONS, INC. 
On Route 100, Auburn, Maine 

BEST REST ROOMS IN 
NEW ENGLAND 

O 

JIMMY'S DINER 

FOR FINE FOODS 
On Route 100, Auburn, Maine 



In the summer of 1961, Pete Bertschmann (B.A., 1956) 
completed his Navy tour and joined New England Tele- 
phone's Boston Sales Department. There, he helped busi- 
ness customers solve their communications problems. So 
capably, in fact, that when ten applicants were screened 
for a supervisory job, Pete won the promotion. 

In his new capacity Pete handled special sales studies, 
wrote speeches, and, among other achievements, contrib- 




uted some valuable suggestions for improving Mobile 
Phone Service. All this brought promotion to his current 
position as a supervisor of the Telephone Sales Program 
with responsibility for training new employees. 

Pete Bertschmann, like many young men, is impatient 
to make things happen for his company and himself. There 
are few places where such restlessness is more welcomed 
or rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 



TELEPHONE MAN-OF-THE-MONTH 



SUCD 




Success comes early to college 
women who supplement their 
education with Gibbs training 
-who obtain marketable skills 
that gain them quick entry into 
the fields of their choice. 

SPECIAL COURSE FOR 
COLLEGE WOMEN -8V2 MONTHS 

Write College Dean 
for GIBBS GIRLS AT WORK 

KATHARINE 
'GIBBS 

9'dCRETA RIAL 
■0W0II J*, MASS., 21 Mar1x>ro«tli$tre«t 

Ntw^jRK 17, n. y„ 20a r 



MONTCLAIR, N. J., 33 W_ 
'R0VIDENCE 6, R. I., 155 Mf tW SfrMt 




I 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



SOUTH OF PARIS 




Grenoble 

8 November 1963 

In the October 9 issue, the 
STUDENT reported a chapel lec- 
ture by Dean Healy, concerning 
the Junior Year Abroad pro- 
gram. I would like to describe 
briefly the set-up here at the 
University of Grenoble, and 
clarify one or two points made 
by Dean Healy. 

The Faculie des Lettres is di- 
vided into two sections: 1) 
courses for all students, and 2) 
courses for foreign students. 
The courses for foreign students 
are divided again into 1) le 
cours inlensif: 10 hours a week 
of introductory French and 2) 
le cours normal, offering 27 
hours a week in everything from 
commercial correspondence to 
an examination of Baudelaire 
and Hugo and their differing 
conceptions of Romantisisme. 
(In terms of the courses given 
at Bates, French 131-132 is ade- 
quate preparation for le cours 
normal, and French 207-208 is 
excellent preparation.) Little or 
no preparation is necessary for 
le cours inlensif . 

The two courses mentioned 
lead to exams for various certif- 
icates and diplomas depending 
on the difficulty of the work 
done through the year. If stu- 
dents wish to stay only one 
semester, there are two exams 
given in Oct., Feb., and June, af- 
ter one semester (summer counts 
as a semester). There are four 
exams for those who have stud- 
ied at least two semesters at 
Grenoble, in October and June. 

Foreign students are free to 
attend most of the courses of- 
fered to regular French stu- 
dents (exception: the first-year 
courses which are over-crowd- 
ed). Unless you have a B.A. or 
B.S. it is better not to register 
as a regular student because the 
certificates and diplomas you 
can' get as a foreign student are 
complete, whereas the certifi- 



PRISCILLA 



Fri., Sat., Sun. 
Continuous Fri. from 5 p.m. 

Sat. from 1 p. mM 
Sun. from 3 p. m.Iiii 

"Diary Of 

A Madman" 

Vincent Price 
Nancy Kovack 
Chris Warfield 

The Pirates Of 
Blood River" 

Kerwin Mathews 
Glenn Corbett 
Christopher Lee 
Marla Landi 
Oliver Reed 





cates you would get after fol- 
lowing a regular course are only 
part of a degree. 

Dean Healy mentioned the 
necessity of the European Uni- 
versities to select students from 
applications. I wish to impress 
upon students who may apply to 
the University of Grenoble, not 
to. You'll just waste your time 
waiting for an acceptance. Just 
come. It sounds crazy after all 
the trouble we have getting into 
college, but it is true. The Uni- 
versity has a special program 
for foreign students and the at- 
titude seems to be "the more the 
merrier. The only requirement is 
that you be over 17 years old. 
You can register any time during 
the year — students are still ar- 
riving three weeks after the 
courses started. 

Grenoble is considered one of 
the more expensive European 
universities, and I know several 
students who left because it was 
too expensve. Tuition is roughly 
$165.00 per year. Rooms range 
from $13.00 a month in the 
dorms, to $25.00 - $40.00 a month 
in private homes. However, as 
you pay less you get less: you're 
lucky if you have central heat- 
ing and/or hot water if you pay 
$20 - $30. Meals are not bad and 
dirt cheap at the university res- 
taurants. Breakfast — 20c (bowl 
of coffee or chocolate, large roll, 
butter, marmalade). Lunch and 
dinner are about 30c each. 

Students run the town — there 
are 15,000 of us — and there are 
innumerable organizations to 
help: AGEG, CUIG, CROUS, 
CUG, MNEF, UNEF, to mention 
a few. Needless to say, each or- 
ganization has a lovely col- 
oured I.D. card, and after a few 
days, each student has a green 
Carte d'ttudiant, a red student 
Union card (15% off at the 
bookstore), a pale yellow meal 
ticket card, a Cine-Club card, 
and a GUC ski-card — and there 
are more. And if all that isn't 
enough to help the students feel 
at home, the local house of ill 
repute is three doors down from 
the student union and "they" 
look with gaudy eyes and wave 
their silver keys. The students 
laugh and the old men count the 
francs in the worn wallets. 



D eW I T T 
MOTOR 
HOTEL 

40 Pine Street 
Catering to 
INDIVIDUAL AND 
GROUP PARTIES 
Sunday and Holiday Dinners 
A Gormet's Delight 



Recital Performers 
Bring Baroque Spirit 

A recital of eighteenth cen- 
tury music last Tuesday brought 
the music of organ, recorder, 
and trumpet to the Centennial 
Colloquia and Convocation. The 
performers were D. Robert 
Smith, organ; Jean Cary Peck 
and Robert R. Peck, descant and 
treble recorders; and Granville 
H. Bowie, trumpet. 

The program opened with 
Antonio Soler's Concerto No. 3, 
in G major, performed by Prof. 
Smith at the organ. 

Three pieces by George Fred- 
erick Handel comprised the sec- 
ond presentation. Jean Cary 
Peck, descant recorder, and 
Robert R. Peck, treble recorder, 
were accompanied by the organ 
in the Air from Water Music 
Suite, the Minuet from Berenice, 
and Gavotte. The recorder, long 
ignored as a performer's instru- 
ment is re-establishing itself 
particularly for seventeenth 
and eighteenth century music. 

Shortly after the invention of 
the keyed instrument Joseph 
Haydn composed his Concerto in 
B flat to demonstrate the capa- 
bilities of the new instrument. 
Accompanied by the organ 
Granville Bowie performed the 
Concerto, showing the capabili- 
ties of a musician as well as 
those of the trumpet itself. 

The performance of the audi- 
ence indicated that the oft cas- 
tigated townspeople are not the 
only ones guilty of ill-placed ap- 
plause. It is established concert 
etiquette to applaud only at the 
end of a completed piece. The 
only time applause is permiss- 
able before the end of an en- 
tire piece is at the end of the 
first movement of a Concerto. 



Carillon Given Three Years 
Ago Has Become Tradition 



Art Notice 

For campus culture enthu- 
siasts, there will be an Exhi- 
bition of Student art work 
shown in the Art Room in 
Hathorn Hall. The Exhibit 
will open Thursday. Novem- 
ber 28. and will run through 
Sunday. December 1. The 
times are Thursday. 4-6; Fri- 
day, 4-6; Saturday. 12:30- 
5:30; Sunday. 11-5. For cam- 




The Source of Joyous Sounds 



Twice a day Bates students 
hear bells, but contrary to 
campus opinion, the students are 
not suffering from nervous anx- 
iety or mentral strain. The 
sound created by the carillon 
comes from the heights of Hath- 
orn Hall at 12 and 5:20 p. m. Al- 
though the carillon's music is a 
traditional part of the campus 
atmosphere, few students under- 
stand the mechanism behind it. 

According to Webster, the 
carillon is "a set of fixed bells 
sounded by striking with ham- 
mers operated either from a key- 
board or mechanically." The 
bells of the Bates carillon are 
not the enormous cast bells 
found in large churches, but 
they produce the same sound. 
This is accomplished by a com- 
plex electrical amplification of 
small bells. 

The three types of bells, 
Flemish, Harp, Celesta, are so 
classified according to their 
style. The traditional carillon 
has only Flemish bells on 
which the melody is played. 
However, the addition of the 
Harp and Celesta bells enables 
accompanying cords to be 
played, resulting in a more 
harmonious piece of music. The 
carillon a clavier (played from 
the organ keyboard) utilizes all 

pus gourmands (and others) 
refreshments will be served. 



three sets of bells. The automatic 
recorded pieces are played on 
the Flemish and Harp bells. 
The songs are "cut" on plastic 
rolls — six songs per roll. 

The Bates carillon was a gift 
given in December 1960 from 
the James Foundation of New 
York which gives money to edu- 
cational institutions for various 
purposes. The James Family be- 
came interested in Bates College 
many years ago through the as- 
sociation of their financial agent 
with President Chase. The chap- 
el was presented in 1912 by Mrs. 
D. Willis James; the organ was 
given by her son. Thus, the 
carillon was actually just one 
part of the generosity of the 
James Family. 

The original gift included 70 
recorded pieces to be selected by 
the college. Since Professor 
Smith, head of the music de- 
partment, was on sabbatical, only 
half of the selections were made. 
Traditional classics, hymns, and 
Bates songs were among this 
group. The last half of the selec- 
tions, made this past year by 
Professor Smith have greater 
variety. In the newer additions 
there are some German and 
French folksongs as well as 
more hymns. 

The quality of the newer selec- 
tions is improved and the songs 
do not sound so "music boxy." 



spill 



Ritz Theatre 

| Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.— 

I "THE NUTTY 
1 PROFESSOR" 

JERRY LEWIS 



111111111111": 



I // 



Critic's Choice" 

BOB HOPE 
LUCILLE BALL 
MARILYN MAXWELL 

— Closed Wednesdays — 




STUDENT SPECIAL 



MEN 

Be Physically Fit — 
Obtain a waistline and 
a pair of shoulders 
you will be proud to 
display on your fav- 
orite beach . . . 



WOMEN 
Be Figure Perfect for 
the Fall fashions — 
with so little effort 
. . . The figure that 
nature intended for 



you can be yours . . . 
PERSONALLY SUPERVISED PROGRAMS 
FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

CALL NOW! 783-2279 

FOR YOUR FREE TRIAL — NO OBLIGATION 

ASK ABOUT REDUCED RATES 
FOR STUDENTS 

To Prove Our Sincerity 

3 MONTHS FREE 
If we fail to get these 
results in 60 days — 
Lose 15 lbs. excess 
body- weight, lose 6/ 2 " 
off hips and waist, lose 
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If we fail to get these 
results in 60 days! 
Add V/ 2 " on each 
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Overweight, lose 15 
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LEWISTON HEALTH STUDIO 
AND FIGURE SALON 



1119 LISBON ST. 



LEW. 



TEL. 783-2279 



HAR-BRO 'DO-JO' 

SCHOOL OF SELF-DEFENSE 
Classes for Men and Women . Call 3-227B 




FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 




"When our generation has passed away, when the 
tongues of praise and comment now speaking have turned 
to a cold dumb dust, it will he written that John F. Ken- 
nedy walked with the American people in their vast di- 
versity and gave them all he had toward their moving 
on into new phases of their great human adventure." 

Carl Sandburg 



'B aires 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 _ Business Manager 

John Bart '64 „ Editorial Assistant 

Alan Hartwell '66 Photographer 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
•66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6681. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 

-class matter at the Lewlston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
S. 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



the act of 



Letters To The Editor 



Much Ado About Something 
To the Editor: 

In two weeks ago's issue of the 
STUDENT, we were provided 
with a meaningful example of 
editorial freedom exercised 
within the context of uncritical 
reflection. Unconcerned with the 
implications of his argument, the 
editor proceeded in a manner 
which may well become an en- 
during monument to his regime, 
at least it will be a credit to his 
sense of responsibility. And if 
the editor regards the logic of a 
view as lacking virtue, then the 
view that he expressed and 
paraded before us is, indeed, a 
very virtuous one. 

This virtuosity can be illus- 
trated by the following excerpts 
— what is enclosed in square 
brackets [ ] I have added for 
the sake of sentence structure, 
and not sententiousness. Thus, 

"NO ANNOUNCEMENT OF 
THE INTENDED VOTING WAS 
MADE, AND THIRTY - FIVE 
PER CENT OF THE CLASS 
WAS NOT IN ATTENDANCE. 

. . [HOWEVER, THERE WERE] 
INDIVIDUALS HOLDING [OP- 
POSING VIEWS ON THE IS- 
SUE AND THEY] HAD ASKED 
THE CLASS PRESIDENT FOR 
AN OPPORTUNITY TO EX- 
PRESS THEM." 

I think that I have accurately 
expressed the editor's view and 
I also think that it is rife with 
self-contradiction. I cannot for 
the life of me figure out how it 
is possible for individuals ig- 
norant of some question's very 
existence to be opposed to it. 
Perhaps the editor can help me 
out in this and then again per- 
haps he can't and can't (NOT 
CANT) get himself out. I shall 
not bother with the other con- 
tradictions expressed implicitly 
in the foregoing, inasmuch as I 
wish to go on to another fasci- 
nating matter. The editor main- 
tained that: 

"THE SENIOR CLASS DID 
NOT DECIDE TO WEAR 
ACADEMIC GOWNS, A MA- 
JORITY OF THE INDIVIDU- 
ALS WHO WERE PRESENT IN 
THE FILENE ROOM LAST 
MONDAY MERELY INDICAT- 
ED THEIR PERSONAL PREF- 
ERENCE, HAVING BEEN IN- 
FLUENCED BY DR. JACK- 



SEA Learns Of 

Private Schools 

Two weeks ago, a large turn- 
out of interested students heard 
Dr. Sidney Jackman speak on 
"The Role of the Private School 
in American Education". He is 
well qualified to speak in this 
topic as he is a graduate of pri- 
vate schools and has taught at 
Exeter. 

First, Dr. Jackman described a 
typical private school as having 
a small enrollment and ivy cov- 
ered buildings. There are very 
few co-ed private schools as the 
academic achievement in these 
schools seems to be lower than 
that in schools solely for one 
sex. 

The curriculum at a private 
school may be described in one 
word, "individual." There is a 
prescribed set of courses, and no 
such courses as driver education 
and marriage are offered to the 
student. In the environment, the 
teacher is freer to experiment 
with new approaches to his sub- 
ject matter. 



MAN'S JOCULARITY." 

First of all, I do not see how 
anyone could be "influenced" by 
Dr. Jackman's jocularity (and 
this includes Dr. Jackman him- 
self). Secondly, when 35% of the 
class is not in attendance then 
we must admit that 65% were 
and when 80% of that 65% vote 
AYE then we must also admit 
that 52% of the entire class has 
cast an affirmative vote. And, I 
believe, that 52% of a voting 
group does constitute a majority. 
Mathematics — I fear — does 
not lie. The facts as I recorded 
them — in anticipation of some 
numbers game coming up — were 
as follows: Total number of stu- 
dents present (by the way, are 
we sure that those who were 
present were all seniors??? 
think of what can be done along 
this line!!!), to repeat: total 
number of students present — 
120 and being 65% of the senior 
class this means that the senior 
class numbers 184 approximate- 
ly. Those voting to parade were 
97, those voting not to parade 
were 23 or 52% of the class voted 
to parade, 13% voted against it 
and 35% did not vote because 
they did not attend this Cultural 
Heritage lecture (a shortcoming 
on their part and no one else's). 

Finally, I shall, because I 
should, point out that there is a 
corollary to the editor's "dem- 
ocratic notions" and they come 
to this: 

IF PERSONAL PREFERENCE 
DECIDES AN ISSUE FOR 
EACH INDIVIDUAL, THEN 
THE ISSUE MAY BE DEBAT- 
ED. AND IF THERE IS NOTH- 
ING BINDING ON ALL SE- 
NIORS, THEN IT MAY WELL 
BE THAT THERE ARE NO 
SENIORS [IN MATHEMATICS 
— pace Baumgartner & Samp- 
son — THIS WOULD BE 
CALLED A NULL CLASS, OR A 
CLASS EMPTY OF INDIVIDU- 
ALS]. THE CONCLUSION, MY 
DEAR EDITOR, IS THIS: 
WHERE THERE ARE NO SE- 
NIORS THERE IS NO PARADE 
AND SO THIS HAS ALL 
BEEN MUCH ADO ABOUT 
NOTHING! 

Dr. G. D. Goldat 



Kudos 

To the Editor: 

I was very proud of the per- 
formance of the Bates College 
students during the Academic 
Colloquium last week. 

They seemed interested in 
taking part in discussion; and 
their dress and demeaner were 
excellent. In view especially of 
the feelings of many of them re- 
garding the attendance regula- 
tions imposed, their actions in 
no way disgraced the College. 

We wanted the College to look 
good, and it did. 

Brooks Quimby 



The Parental Word 
To the Editor: 

May a cool, distant, bills-pay- 
ing parent add to the controver- 
sy on the convocation — now 
that it's all over? 

(1) Since classes were vir- 
tually cancelled during the two 
days of the panel discussions, I 
think attendance at them was 
reasonably required. 

(2) In ordering attendance 
at the convocation, the faculty 
may have been tactless. Or were 
rapping knuckles on purpose? 

(3) The quality of visiting 
lecturers, or the extent of stu- 
dent apathy to them, doesn't 
worry me much. Visiting lectur- 
ers are the oysters in the dress- 
ing — some like oysters, some 
don't, some don't even like 
dressing in their turkey. What 
I'm paying for, I hope, is the 
quality of your own faculty's 
lectures and my student's partic- 
ipation in regular college work. 

(4) Let there be argument, 
frenzy, even name calling, but 
letters to the Bates STUDENT 
should be shorter. 

(5) Headlines in the Bates 
STUDENT should be . . . well, 
how about that "Renown Cell- 
ist"? How about that now? 

Glenn Neville 



Side Effects 
Dear Editor: 

Whatever the colloquia, their 
side effects were good. The most 
notable ones: a marked im- 
provement (especially on the 
men's side of campus) in stu- 
( Continued on page five) 



IMPRESSIONS UPON THE NEWS OF 
PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S DEATH 

By WILLIAM HISS '66 
A group of students in the fishbowl, 
listening in the silence for hope. 
Ten minutes before — nothing but hope. 
Nobody knew then. 
Now nothing, no one knows. 
They're staring at the table top, 
grinding out the table. 
Where's the nug in the grain of the wood? 

People going somewhere along the walks — who cares where — 

walking by each other silently, 

each thinking his own thoughts and everyone else's. 

A professor leaning against the door, smoking a cigarette 
and looking into space. 

Everyone looking into the space of overwhelming silence, 
Looking out a window, wondering why. 

A door opens, a person enters, hesitates, and slowly walks to his 
seat. 

A small thin girl sitting in the den twisting her hands: 

"Why I just didn't believe it; I thought it was some kind of a joke." 

• 

The nation knows now. Girls crying quietly. 

The union thronged with students grouped around the television. 

The same news over and over again. 

Running rumors — Johnson's had a heart attack. 

But the one awful undeniable rumor: 

Kennedy's dead — shot in the head — dead . . . dead. 

The poor ugly chapel, beautiful only in the dark 

with the solid shadows cast from the beams , 

over the seeming heads «\ 

of hundreds of wondering whys. 

Attendance tickets cast in the heart, 

and the Guest Speaker spoke in a moment of silence. 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



FIVE 



Educational T. V. Station 
Is Encyclopedia Of The Air 




Short 



Mr. Elmore B. Lyford, Executive Director, seated; 1. to fw 
Mrs. Maxine C. Wheeler; Mrs. Dorothy O. Pierce; Mr. Richard 
W. Russell, Program Manager; and Mrs. Bernadette L. Quinn. 



"Culture may displace may- 
hem for fifty-eight per-cent of 
Maine's population who can 
choose to view WCBB (Colby - 
Bates - Bowdoin Educational 
Telecasting Corporation) daily. 
Channel 10, Maine's first educa- 
tional T.V. station, which began 
operating in 1962, is in its de- 
velopmental phase. 

The non-commercial $600,000 
T.V. equipment is in Litchfield, 
Maine, and transmits stimulating 
and sometimes thought-provok- 
ing programs such as Parlais 
Francais; Sake: The Improper 
Stories of H. H. Munro; the 
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra; 
and At Issue. 

Triangle Cooperation 

The table top organization 
work and over-the-desk con- 
ferences are held on the Bates 
Campus in Upper Chase Hall. 
Here, Mr. E. B. Lyford coordi- 
nates the presentations of pro- 
grams which are the material of 
the first experiment in a trian- 
gle cooperative T.V. venture in 
the U.S.A. 

It is perhaps indicative of the 

— 




LEWISTON 
Phone 784-4611 

SALE 
BATES 
BOBCAT 
RUGS 

Stenciled Fiber 
27" x 54" 

Just 50 - Reg. $4.95 

Sale $2.49 

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FURNITURE DEPT. 

3rd Floor 



values of "simplicity, integrity, 
and steadfastness" that are 
Bates, that an incative locale for 
a transmitting station in Augus- 
ta was leased by Bates, under 
President Phillips' directive and 
tri-college funds, in 1956. 

Lyford Optimistic 

A student, on seeing Lyford 
cross the Bates campus, might 
remark on the man's ruddy 
Maine-like complexion, the 
sparkling optimistic eyes, and 
the conservative blue suit in re- 
served terms. However, Lyford's 
background of twenty years' ap- 
prenticeship in commercial tel- 
evision gives him a cosmopolitan 
finesse in exploring the possibil- 
ities of E-TV. His optimistic high 
hopes for the future of this 
form of T.V. are practically ef- 
fecatious. Lyford is an enthusi- 
astic gambler. 

His candid camera eye is as- 
sisted by the professional writ- 
er, Mrs. Pierce, and Mr. Russel, 
Lyford shows his willingness to 
experiment with amateur fresh- 
ness within the structure of 
technical perfection. The reflec- 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 



By PERRY BRUDER *65 

As I was doing pull-ups on my 
roommate's outstretched arm I 
got to thinking that I've had 
some good times adjusting to a 
place like Bates, which is geared 
to people much taller than I. My 
first few days here were especi- 
ally funny. 

On first attempting to use the 
mirror in my room, I discovered 
that I could see my hair and 
forehead. That was all. An ad- 
visor had once told me that col- 
lege might prove to be "over my 
head" but this wasn't the inter- 
pretation I'd given his remark. 

"Hang in, Brud," I thought, 
"things have been worse." (Like 
the time time suggested I buy a 
certain used car because it had 
lots of leg room.) 

Later in the week I went to be 
issued a gym uniform. The 
equipment manager looked me 
up and down (which isn't much 
of a job) with a pitying stare, 
then gave me the stuff. I 
thought the idea of a sweatshirt 
which covered the whole body 
was pretty practical, but I 
couldn't see why the pants were 
so tight in the armpits. And 
though I'd barely heard of Mr. 
Ross, I realized that one sneak- 



Scottish Students Depicted 
As Rugged Individualists 



By RICHARD HILLMAN '65 

G. J. Renier characterizes 
Scots as being "proud, intelli- 
gent, religious and unfathom- 
able." Like his fellow country- 
men, the student has a deep 
sense of national pride. On 
special occasions he proudly 
wears the tartan of his clan in 
the form of a kilt. (As a point of 
interest, approximately seventy 
per cent of kilt-adorned Scots 
wear them in true Scot fashion!) 

University life is marked by a 
very high degree of freedom. 
There are formal lectures sup- 
plemented by tutorials. Attend- 
ance is never taken. A reading 
list for each course is suggested 
by the professor and it is the 
student's obligation to be well- 



tive student may recall a Tag- 
liabue poetry reading, a Goldat 
plan, and Dr. Bixler lectures. 

The democratic treatment of 
the intellect is a particularly 
ambitious banquet. Where the 
host attempts to provide a tidbit 
for every quest, the banquet of- 
ten becomes imposing, if not 
formidable. 

Let student interest and the 
awareness of the community 
help to maintain the discerning 
qualities of Maine's encyclopedia 
of the air. 

To the Editor: 

(Continued from page four) 
dent dress; and a deluge of 
professors to the Den. They ac- 
tually sat down and talked for 
a while, instead of the customary 
standing with one foot in the 
door, a cup of coffee in one 
hand, and a "Do not approach" 
sign in the other. I, for one, en 
joy talking to professors, who 
seem to be if not more intelli- 
gent than students, certainly 
better read. 

Appreciatively, 

Pamela Ball '64 



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er into which I could fit both my 
feet was a clever move. 

I don't remember who my 
"shoe date" was but I hope she 
still wears that lovely belt buc- 
kle. 

Sometimes a short person feels 
that people are prejudiced be- 
cause of his height (or lack 
thereof). Recently, for instance, 
a fellow I know at home (who's 
about my size) was dating a girl 
whose mother quite thoroughly 
and obviously despised him, he 
thought because he was short. 
This was absurd. He quickly 
found out she had no height 
prejudice at all. She hated tall 
Jews just as much. 

Knowing, like my friend, that 
there's no bias against him, a 
short person has only to learn to 
live with the constant remarks 
people make. This isn't easy 
when, for example, you're told 
you could sit down at a certain 
table but they don't have a high 
chair. Don't hold your temper! 
Punch the tormentor right in 
the knee! 

Nice people create a problem 
too. Last year, a girl told me I'd 
lose a great deal of my charac- 
ter if I were taller. That may be 
true, but thank you, I'll risk it. 

PATRONIZE 
OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



read in his field. This becomes 
apparent in tutorials, essays, and 
degree examinations. 

The student government as 
well as athletic clubs, political 
and social clubs form an import- 
ant part of University life and 
are run entirely by the students. 
In order to stay in the Univer- 
sity a student need only pass de- 
gree exams. However, in order 
to write these exams, a class 
ticket (a statement of success- 
ful class work) is necessary. 

Many Flunk 

Almost half of all Scottish stu- 
dents are flunked out. Approxi- 
mately two and one half per 
cent of the population hold de- 
grees, usually from one of the 
four Scottish Universities. 

The University of Glasgow, 
the largest in Scotland, has only 
seven and one half thousand 
students. A trend to expand the 
higher education system is now 
being manifest in such proposed 
action as the Robbins Report 
(an attempt to establish another 
University). Opposition to this 
trend toward more and larger 
universities is mainly based on 
the idea that expansion would 
lower the educational standard. 

The Scottish student is well 
aware of the standard that is 
maintained. He accepts the fact 
that not everyone who qualifies 
for the university will attain a 
degree. This does not stop him 
from truly enjoying his univer- 
sity career (which is usually 
subsidized by a government 
grant.) 

Student Opinion 

One Mr. Ron Campbell, a first 
year student, maintains that "so- 
cial life is so pressing that there 
is no time for studies!" On the 
other hand Mr. Ian McGregor, 
a third year student, says "In 
order for me to pass my exams 
I must read and study twenty- 
five hours a day!" 

Scottish students as well as 
Britishers in general feel that 
education on the Isles is by far 
the best in the world. They feel 
that thorough knowledge in one 
field is superior to having rudi- 
mentary understanding in many 
fields. The topic of "liberal" ver- 
sus "practical" education is a 
subject of little controversy in 
the mind of a Scottish student. 



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six 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



I 



< 



Colloquia 

(Continued from page one) 

Miriam Van Waters, and Val H. 
Wilson comprised the Social 
Sciences Symposium. Mr. Miller 
stressed that colleges must de- 
velop liberal individuals who are 
responsible to society. "The in- 
dividual must be independent 
and strong but considerate of 
his peers. His freedom must be 
earned by a willingness to 
serve society in any capacity." 

Mrs. Stratton stressed that the 
individual obviously not be ob- 
solete, because he is born alone 
and he dies alone. "The individ- 
ual is not obsolete if he is not 
obsolete to himself." 

Mr. Val Wilson asserted that 
while large interest groups are 
necessary to the smooth func- 
tioning of society the individual 
must not become lost in these 
groups. The individual "must 
have a working conception of 
government and the capacity to 
influence and inform the govern- 
ment. Mr. Wilson left the panel 
and audience to consider for 
themselves the question, "Is not 
a judicious conformity being 
oneself?" 

Business and the Individual 

The third colloquium present- 
ed a panel of representatives of 
business and industry. Mr. E. 
Robert Kinney spoke on "In- 
dividualism and the Organiza- 
tion." He said that the worker 
must know the boundaries of his 
work in order to produce the 
greatest initiative. As worker 
initiative grows, the business 
grows. 

Charles Francis Adams spoke on 
the effect of labor unions on the 
freedom of the individual in la- 
bor. He said that the worker's 
freedoms and desires are some- 
what restricted by the unions. 
He also stated that they infringe 
on the political rights of the in- 
dividual to some degree. 

George Olmsted Jr. spoke of 
the effect of automation on the 
labor force. "The • day of the 
skilled craftsman is not passed," 
he said. There is a greater need 
for skilled hands to work on 
high-speed, delicate machines. 
The crisis is job placement of the 
unskilled worker. He further 
.stated that automation, as a 
force for business survival can- 
not be stopped. 

Religion Defined 

The Philosophy and Religion 
panel centered around a defini- 
tion of Religion and its relation 
to Philosophy. Mrs. Helen Hill 
Stuber refined religion as "not 




Hundreds March To Honor 
Bates' Hundreth Birthday 

Assorted faculty, students, delegates from northeastern 
colleges, Bates alumni, and friends of the College marched 
into the Alumni Gymnasium to the tune of Handel's "Royal 
Fireworks Music" on Wednesday, November 20, 1963, for the 
Academic Convocation in cele-« " " " 

bration of the Centennial of home after two h™ dre d years of 



The Convocation Procession 



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only a quest but an achievement 
whereby man and God are 
brought into fellowship. All 
men at all times and in all 
places have undertaken the 
search." She further stated that 
the role of education today is to 
make religion relevant for ev- 
ery man and woman. 

Dr. Rayborn L. Zerby de- 
scribed religion as "the highest 
loyalty an individual has." He 
stressed the importance of in- 
tellectual education in helping to 
choose and organize his value." 
with respect to the supreme ob- 
ject of loyalty. 

Dr. J. Seelye Bixler asserted 
that religion and philosophy are 
parallel and cannot be separated. 
He suggested that the emotional 
and intellectual aspects of a 
person are related and interde- 
pendent — "The kind of God we 
believe in depends on our crit- 
ical faculties." 

Common Sense Urged 

Philip Hofer opened the Art 
and Music symposium with an 
address criticizing extreme sub- 
jectivism in the artist. In asking 
for greater discretion on the 
part of art-lovers he stated that 
the artist may create for himself 
but cannot morally demand rec- 
ognition of such work. Mr. Hofer 
stated that most esoteric abtracts 
find their audience among in- 
tellectual snobs and followers of 
fashion. 



said, must be like a good suit — 
it must be contemporary and yet 
lasting. 



Architect A 1 o n z o Harriman 
said that in architecture there is 
a trend away from the individu- 
al, towards the group. He stated 
that an architect cannot be sel- 
fishly individualistic and that 
young men in the field have a 
considerable influence, but often 
yield to the temptation to imi- 
tate. The design of a building, he 



Mrs. Ada Holding Miller 
praised the role of folk music as 
a truly American expression of 
our ideals. She said that the 
outstanding representatives of 
American music are Mitch Mill- 
er and Leonard Bernstien. Mrs. 
Miller strongly favored govern- 
ment subsidy of the arts which 
she claims is necessary to the 
development of our native tal- 
ent — people who would other- 
wise study and work abroad. 

William Thon, one of Ameri- 
ca's foremost artists, stated di- 
rectly that individuality is im- 
portant in thought and as a 
means of expression — one of 
the most important and signifi- 
cant assets an artist can have. 
He said that detachment and 
intimacy are also important. 
The artist must speak his own 
language and speak of his own 
dreams and truths. 

The Word and the Image 

Edwin Canham ' 25 led the 
speakers of the Literature, 
Drama, and Journalism with a 
discussion of meaninglessness in 
contemporary literature. He stat- 
ed that contemporary honesty is 
to be admired, but criticized the 
tendency to call a spade a spade 
and the use of it to dig up dirt. 
Canham raised the question, "It 
art a product of the society, or 
does it produce the society?" 

Gladys Hasty Carroll '25 said 
that man always finds what he 
is looking for whether or not he 
is aware of his search. If he 
finds dirt that is what he was 
looking for. Nevertheless, the 
artist must present what he sees, 
hears and feels, Mrs. Carroll 
said. 



Bates College. The Wind Instru- 
ment Ensemble was led by Prof. 
D. Robert Smith. 

After a carefully-phrased In- 
vocation by Peter J. Gomes '65, 
Clarence Cook Little and James 
Stacy Coles offered greetings 
from the public and the colleges, 
respectively. 

The President responded and 
introduced the keynote speaker, 
Mr. Franklin Hamilton Bowles, 
Director of Education Program, 
Ford Foundation. Mr. Bowles 
(shortly becoming Dr. Bowles) 
spoke of his experiences during 
travel in Chile. 

There he found a new univer- 
sity constructed with the intent 
of keeping the young men at 



having them leave for the big 
city; of his trips to various 
parts of Africa, and to India. He 
drew these accounts together 
with the remark that it is im- 
possible to have progress in ed- 
ucation where there is domestic 
and civil strife, pointing to our 
own race difficulties at te con- 
clusion. 

The Bates Chapel Choir then 
responded with five minutes of 
angelic alleluias. 

After the awarding of honor- 
ary degrees to Mr. Bowles, and 
Philip Hofer the Alma Mater 
was sung and the Academicians 
recessed to Handel's Water Mu- 
sic, the Senior class led by Dr. 
Jackman resplendent in Harvard 
Crimson. 



Religious Groups 
Open To Students 

CAMPUS CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP 

Linda Gramatky, Pres. 
Meets at the Women's Union, 
7:00 p. m., Tues. 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
COLLEGE GROUP 
Roger Klein, Pres. 
Cynthia Freeman, Sec, Treas. 
Meets at 16 Abbot St., 7:30 
p. m., Sunday 

EDWARDS FELLOWSHIP 
(Federated Church) 
Sue Lennox, Pres. 
Peter Allen, V.P., Treas. 
Barbara Reed, Sec. 
Rev. William R. Huber, Ad- 
Meets at 10 White St., 7:00 
p. m., Sunday 

HILLEL (Jewish) 
Linda Glazer, Pres. 
Dave Jacobs, Treasurer 
Meets at the Jewish Commun- 
ity Center, 134 College St. 
(Meetings to be announced, 
generally every other Sun.) 

JUDSON FELLOWSHIP . 
(United Baptist Church) 
Doug White, Pres. 
Rev. John R. Schroeder, Ad- 
visor 

Meetings at the Parsonage, 
336 College St., 8:00 p.m., 
Sunday 

NEWMAN CLUB (Catholic) 
Tony DiAngelis, Pres. 
Gregg Shea, V.P. 
Kathy Lysaght, Sec. 
Meets at 393 Main St. (St. 
Joseph's School) every other 
Sunday evening 

YOUNG RELIGIOUS LIBERALS 

Dick Derby, Pres. 
Meets at the home of Dean 



CA Sponsors 
Fun And Games 

By SUE LORD '66 
Each Tuesday night the Chris- 
tian Association sponsors an 
hour of fun and games in the 
Y.M.C.A. pool in Auburn. 

"Keep away" played with a 
large buoyant red ball quickly 
determined the prowess of the 
Bates boys. The girls fared a lit- 
tle better in the game of "chick- 
en". Each co-ed mounted the 
shoulders of the nearest "surfer 
Joe", and the battle was on. 

Fancy diving displayed by 
several of the swimmers proved 
quite enlightening. It seems that 
a few new ways of going off the 
board were invented as nearly 
everyone tried their skill at div- 
ing. 

The hour spent, twenty-five 
tired, somewhat bedraggled 
Bates swimmers emerged from 
their refreshing dip. Tensions 
gone, worries forgotten, the 
swimming students were suffi- 
ciently soothed to go back to 
work. But don't forget next 
week! 

Walter Boyce, 15 Abbott St. 
(Meetings to be announced). 
Note: If there are any other de- 
nominational groups which 
should be included on this list, 
please contact either Linda Gla- 
zer (Page 312) or Natalie Fitch- 
er (Mitchell). 



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PAPERBACKS 

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Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

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First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



- 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 



7/ 

SEVEN 




(Farrington Photo) 



Girl Sports Fan Applauds 
Daler Sensation McKusick 

By ELLEN LOWENBURG '66 

His friends, kidding him happily about his fantastic record 
of success after success on the Bates Cross Country team, 
assure him that, if he doesn't graduate summa cum laude, he 
will certainly graduate Phi Bobba Catta. If he keeps on at 
his present rate, only one thing is sure: Karl McKusick, the 

smiling freshman from Roches-* 

ter, New York, will go down in 
Bates College history as one of 
the finest athletes that the 
school has ever been able to 
boast. 

Joking and laughing in a booth 
in the den, or between classes, 
or at a Chase Hall dance, Karl | 
appears to be simply a likeable, 
friendly guy; casual, unassum- 
ing and devoid of the conceit 
one might expect of an athlete 
with his backlog of achieve- 
ments. There is nothing of the 
go-getter about him. But just 
put him on a track, and does he 
ever go and get! 
Well, for Example 

Take Monday, November 18th, 
for instance. Where did he go? 
Down to New York, to compete 
against some of the finest col- 
legiate runners in the country in 
the IC4A. What did he get? 
ONLY this year's freshman title! 
Let it be understood, of course, 
that the two time Bobcat of the 
Week who flew to New York to 
run his last and most important 
race of the season, had behind 
him a glowing record of cross- 
country wins that started on Oc- 
tober 4, when he led the Bates 
team to victory over Colby, and 
flagged only once, when he came 
in second to M.I.T.'s Sumner 
Brown. 

At meet after meet throughout 
the fall, mercurial McKusick 
never ceased to amaze; making 
and breaking records right and 
left, he proved a source of pride 
to Bates during the entire sea- 
son. The performance put in by 
the fleet-footed freshman won 
him not only his Batesy letter 
sweater, but the chance to run 
in the IC4A at Van Cortlandt 
Park, where he beat last year's 
record of sixteen minutes and 
six seconds, dashing across the 
finish line ahead of his oppon- 
ents at 15:38. 

"I just hung back and let 
them go for awhile," Karl says 
of the race, "and then, around 
the two mile mark—" BAM! 
And Bates College has a win- 
ner, a hero worth writing home 
about. 

A Good Time Was Had 

Karl, who calls his IC4A ex- 
perience "a lot of fun" (he was 
rewarded with a medal which 
he describes as being "really 
sharp") gives much of the 
credit for his repeated and phe- 



Steves Scripts 



By STEVE BARRON '64 

This is sickening Steve, your 
repulsive reporter filling in for 
Don King, who is vacationing 
for the fourth week in a row. 

A volleyball jamboree was 
held last Wednesday night at the 
J.C.C. Providing the first stern 
test for the off-campus dark- 
horse contenders was a repre- 
sentative team from the Jewish 



nomenal successes to Coach 
Walt Slovenski. 

"He's such a great guy that 
you just want to run your best 
for him — and for Bates," says 
McKusick, who feels that his 
close relationship with Sloven- 
ski has definitely had a marked 
and positive influence on him. 

So, bring out the garnet laurel 
wreath — Bates cross-country 
followers decidely have someone 
for whom to give a loud and 
hearty BOB-BOB-BOBCAT this 
time. But Karl McKusick hasn't 
stopped running, not by a long 
shot. Next year, when cross- 
country season rolls around, 
there will be a Bates sophomore 
doing his best to prove that even 
a fantastic freshman record can 
be beaten, and he will be doing 
this next year as he has done it 
this year — not for himself 
alone, but for his coach, his 
team, and his school. 

Congratulations to a fine ath- 
lete and a good sport. 



Community Center. The Play- 
boys, led by Bunny Zeus, were 
far from spectacular in their de- 
but on the small court. This har- 
monious contingent with an in- 
ternational flavoring showed 
their resiliency after a disheart- 
ening opening game defeat by 
rebounding, after a brief rest, to 
put together a winning streak of 
five games. 

Even Gods Get Tired 

This rest period was initiated 
to allow "Ancient Art" to re- 
cuperate. He still managed to 
keep up with the "boys" as they 
continually upset their opposi- 
tion by their alert play-makng. 
Sparked by the stellar play of 
Skip "I can't hit it low" Vollans, 
and Pete "We gotta get Barron 
out of here" Pequinot, the Play- 
things exhibited the same char- 
acteristics that made them such 
a titan during the football 
campaign. One of the highlights 
of the evening was the surpris- 
ing vernacular pf that "nice 
Jewish boy", Abey King. 

J.B. won their final intramu- 
ral championship of the season 
as they vanquished a valiant B 
league team from Smith Middle. 
The first score of the contest 
came as rugged Ron Vance 
picked off a Tamis aerial and 
rambled for twenty agonizing 



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Basketball Team Opens 
With Favored Colby 

This year's edition of the 
Bates College basketball team 
opens Monday in Waterville with 
Colby. It will be the first game 
of the year for both clubs. Col- 
by must be rated for the state 
favorite in light of their height, 
experience, and presence of All- 
New England Ken Stone. 

Coach Peck is optimistic about 
the 'Cats' possibilities, and in an 
attempt to compensate for a lack 
of height, is initiating a three 
guard offense with an emphasis 
on speed. On defsense, one can 
expect to see the 'Cats do a lot 

of full court pressing with an oc- 1 yards to paydirt. Rapid Ron also 
casional trap, or zone defense. 

The tentative starting lineup 
has Mike Hine and Bill Beiss- 
wanger at the forwards ,and 
Seth Cummings, Ted Krzynowek, 
and Don Beaudry, last year's trio 
of mosquitoes, at the three 
guards. The second unit expect- 
ed to see a lot of action consists 
of Bob Micheler, Bob Johnson, 
and Fred Stevens at the guards, 
and Capt. Will Gardiner and 
Carl Johanesen at the forwards. 

Friday, the Garnet travels to 
Manchester, N. H., where they 
meet the powerful St. Anselm's 
squad, and Saturday meet last 
year's New England small col- 
lege champion team Northeast- 
ern in Boston. Maine's Phil Soule 



had a hand in the only other 
score of the game as he lofted a 
twenty yard bomb to Agile Art 
Purinton, who was waiting in 
the end zone. 
Excess Curricular 

Not all of the intramural ac- 
tivities were confined to the 
athletic field this past week. 
Friends of Christopher Colum- 
bus also held a show of their 
own. A real swinging time was 
had by all, but it took Bloop to 
start the barrels rolling. 

Off-Campus Man of the Week 
honors go to Peter "Pop-Top" 
Pequinot for his stellar efforts 
on the volleyball court and for 
his successful debut as social di- 
rector. 






Bates' Steve Ritter 



(Talbot Photo) 

Cheerleader 

We're from Bates 
And no one could be prouder!" 
Why? Just one reason is soph- 
omore cheerleader Nancy Muzio 
from Stafford Spring, Conn. 
Nancy's addition to this year's 
squad is her constant vitality 
and sparkling smile. She puts 
her heart and soul into cheer- 
ing, and often feels she is 
"playing" the game. Because of 
this sincere involvement, she is 
disappointed when Batesies 
don't cheer enthusiastically. 

Nancy's interest in athletics 
does not always keep her on the 
sidelines since she also enjoys 
active particpation in volleyball 
and basketball. This energetic 
girl doesn't remain still long; her 
idea of relaxation is dancing. 

When not taking part in this 
physical exercise, Nancy can be 
found in Hedge Lab preparing 
for a future in medical re- 
search. Even here it is doubtful 
that "the Moose" is motionless. 

The clearest insight into Nan- 
cy's personality can be gained 
from her dorm-mates. As hazing 
representative, she dominated 
the freshmen's lives for those 
first weeks. All of Frye is aware 
of her keen interest in food and 
her superior sewing ability. The 
"Moose" is Frye's defense 
against the famous Bates apathy 
and like Bates "no one could be 
prouder." 



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7^ 

EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, NOVEMBER 27, 1963 




STUDENT Selects All-Maine Team 

Carr, Ritter Chosen From Bates; 
Bowdoin, Maine Place Four Each 

BY KEITH BOWDEN '64 

The Sports Staff of the STUDENT presents its 1963 All-Maine Football Team as chosen 
by a poll of the STUDENT staff. 

The team is characterized by a line averaging 215 pounds from tackle to tackle, two ver- 
satile ends, a trio of hard running backs and complimented by the passing skills of Bob 
Harrington. The team has six seniors, all in the line, two juniors and three sophomores. 
State Champion Bowdoin and* 
powerful Maine each placed 
four men on the squac 1 Bates 
followed with two and Colby 
had one representative. Drigotas, 
Smith, Soule and Carr are re- 
peaters from last year's STU- 
DENT Team. 

Captained Champs 

Drigotas captained Bowdoin 
to its State Series title this 
year. His specialty is defense 



By NICK BASBANES 

The sudden death of President Kennedy left in the hearts 
of the world a large degree of emptiness, a feeling of great 
personal loss. The sports world also felt the weight of a 
crushing blow: for John Kennedy, in addition to his great 
stature of a leader, was in addition an avid proponent and ad- 
mirer of athletics. His enthusiasm was seen most profound- 
ly in both his personal and national philosophy concerning 
sports. 

All of us can recall pictures and accounts of the famous 
Kennedy touch football games, contests in which a number of 
family members took part. Sports Illustrated, in an article 
describing the vitality of the late President's administration, 
captioned the story, "The Vim and Vigah of the New Fron- 
tier." Jack Kennedy always found time to cheer his alma 
mater, Harvard, on numerous occasions. His last appearance 
at a Crimson contest was October 14; he entered the stadium 
virtually unnoticed, stayed for the first half, and left in the 
same inconspicuous manner in which he arrived. 

As a Harvard undergraduate, John Kennedy participated 
in as many sports as he could. When he was in the Navy, and 
in the years following, he took part in the sports of tennis, 
handball, golf, swimming, fishing, boating, in addition to the 
more famous touch football. He was also a fan of the big 
spectator sports of baseball, basketball, and hockey. He ex 
pressed the opinion that the professional sport made avail 
able a fine interest for people who were unable, either 
physically or due to lack of time, to take part in the games 
themselves. 

When he was elected President, Jack Kennedy declared 
an immediate need for a national physical fitness program. 
He encouraged sponsors from all over the country to support 
this endeavor, and to run it he enlisted some of the country's 
more outstanding names in sports. As the head of the coun- 
cil, Jack appointed Bud Wilkinson, the very popular and suc- 
cessful football coach at Oklahoma. Enthusiastically taking 
the reins of the job, Wilkinson stated that, "I felt after talk- 
ing with the President this assignment could be the most im- 
portant one I would receive in my lifetime." The success of 
this program today can be attributed to the great concern of 
our late President. 

Arthur Sampson, in The Boston Herald, observed that it 
wasn't any coincidence when President Kennedy appointed 
former sports greats to key positions. Sampson pointed out 
further that Byron (Whizzer) White, the nation's outstanding 
halfback at Colorado in the late 1930's, was appointed to the 
Supreme Court. Harvard Capt. Ken O'Donnell was a per- 
sonal friend and appointment secretary. Former Dartmouth 
and Army football coach Earl (Red) Blaik was named a 
mediator in Birmingham racial problems. Mr. Kennedy's 
great concern with sports was shown also when he attempted 
to settle the long standing feud between the A.A.U. and the 
N.C.A.A. He selected Gen. Douglas MacArthur as the man to 
mediate when a dispute arose which threatened the forth- 
coming Olympic Games. 

In conclusion we can say that in the tragic loss of John F. 
Kennedy the world lost a devoted and dedicated man. His 
devotion to mankind was expressed in innumerable areas: 
athletics was merely one of the many. His proficiency and 
interest in athletics made him indeed a number one sports 
fan. 




Bates' Tom Carr 



and blocking from the tight end 
position. His 46 yard pass re- 
ception set up Bowdoin's lone 
score in their defeat of Maine. 
Waldman, a three year letterman 
at Colby, was the favorite aerial 
target of the Colby qurterbacks. 

Smith was a monster on both 
offense and defense and was 
especially adept at rushing the 
passer. Andrew was the bulwark 
of the fine Bowdoin line. 

Maine placed both their guards 
on the team. Soule, considered 
to be one of the best linemen 
ever to play at Maine, gave the 
Black Bears much in the way of 
blocking and pass protection. 
Boucher, another rugged line- 
man, is one of the best place 



kickers in New England. This 
season he broke an all time 
Maine record for most extra 
points kicked during a college 
career. 

Ritter came into his own this 
year and was the defensive 
standout on a team with a some- 
what inexperienced line. Ritter 
was chosen to captain the 1964 
Bates squad. 
Big Brothers 

Paul Soule, younger brother 
of Maine's Phil Soule, was Bow- 
doin's leading ground gainer. 
His fine power running kept the 
defenses open for Bowdoin's 
passing game. Haley was an- 
other versatile back who could 
hit the middle of the line or go 
wide. He was also a top threat 
on the short screen pass. 

Tom Carr, the sophomore full- 
back has already earned the 
recognition of being one of the 
most powerful runners in State 
Series history. With Bates ex- 
pected to have a much stronger 
line next season, enemy tack- 
lers can look forward to many 
rough afternoons trying to halt 
Carr's powerful charges through 



the line. 

The third sophomore in the 
backfield is Bowdoin' talented 
quarterback, Bob Harrington. 
Harrington, an excellent passer 
and signal caller, led Bowdoin to 
a seven win and one defeat sea- 
son on the strength of his aerial 
abilities. He was picked over 
Maine's Dick DeVarney on the 
basis of Bowdoin's 7-0 upset 
victory over Maine which he di- 
rected. 




Colby's Bruce Waldman 



All-Maine Team 





Player 


Weight 


Class 


School 


End 


Frank Drigotas 


195 


Sr. 


Bowdoin 


End 


Bruce Waldman 


180 


Sr. 


Colby 


Tackle 


Ernie Smith 


225 


Sr. 


Maine 


Tackle 


David Andrew 


215 


Sr. 


Bowdoin 


Guard 


Roger Boucher 


210 


Sr. 


Maine 


Guard 


Phil Soule 


230 


Sr. 


Maine 


Center 


Steve Ritter 


195 


Jr. 


Bates 


QB 


Bob Harrington 


175 


So. ■ 


Bowdoin 


HB 


Mike Haley 


190 


Jr. 


Maine 


HB 


Paul Soule 


185 


So. 


Bowdoin 


FB 


Tom Carr 


220 


So 


Bates 



On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
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Phone 4-7521 Lewiston. Maine 
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Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main St. Lewiston 

Next to Bus Terminal 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. at Bates St. 

Tel. 783-2011 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



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Hates 




Stu dint 



73 



Vol. XC, No. 11 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



By Subscription 



* » 



4* 



Freshmen Elect 
Class Officers 
And Senators 

Ten weeks after matricula- 
tion, the class oi 1967 elected 
officers last Friday. Sixty-live 
per cent of the class voted. 

Elected to the Student Senate 
were .Peter Beekman of New 
Shrewsbury, New Jersey and 
Catherine Southall of Kockville, 
Maryland. 

Filling the other positions are 
Richard Powers of W. Hartford, 
Conn., president, and Wendell 
Marsden oi Spencer, Mass., vice- 
president. 

Baroara Hill of Bingham, 
Maine, is the class secretary, 
and JNancy Heglund oi Lynn- 
lieid, Mass., was selected to be 
treasurer. 

The newly-elected class officers 
met with the fresnman Senate 
representatives briefly in the 
SKeiton Bounge last Monday. 

At this meeting it was decid- 
ed tnat a meeting of the class of 
'67 will be held bunday, Decem- 
ber 8 at 1:U0, probably in the 
Bittle Theater. 



NOTICE 
Dr. David B. Bass. Scien- 
tific Director of the U.S. 
Army Research Institute of 
Environmental Medicine at 
Natick, Mass., will speak to 
students in two biology 
courses, and address all in- 
terested students tomorrow 
evening at 8 p.m. in room 
122 of Carnegie Science 
Hall. His topic will be the 
career possibilities involving 
biological research in gov- 
ernment institutions. 



Chapel Committee 
Begins Investigating 
Required Programs 

A student committee to inves- 
tigate compulsory chapel and as- 
sembly attendance has recently 
been formed by the Student 
Senate. Primarily a student 
committee, the group is under 
the chairmanship of Sally M. 
Smyth '65. 

Considerable interest in this 
project has been expressed by 
approximately thirty students, 
but since such a large member- 
ship would tend to impede the 
committee's progress, a repre- 
senative group of five students 
has been selected. 
Commitfee Members 

The members of the commit- 
tee are: Mel Burrows '66, Laura 
Deming '65, Peter d'Errico '65, 
Nancy Lester '64, and Sam 
Withers '65. 

At a time to be announced, 
however, a meeting of all stu- 
dents who are interested in the 
work of this group will be held. 
At this time any and all sugges- 
tions and comments will be en- 
tertained. 

Possibiliiies For Change 

Presently, the committee is 
initiating a study of the various 
possibilities for changing the 
present program. Letters are 
being sent to other schools with 
comparable programs. 

A survey will be conducted 
early next semester to measure 
student opinion on the present 
Chapel program. At the present 
time, the committee is especial- 
ly anxious to hear constructive 
suggestions for changing the 
program. A written statement of 
one's ideas may be submitted to 
any member of the committee. 




Part of the Association Exhibit 



Art Association Exhibit 
Featured Student Efforts 



Members of the Bates Art As- 
sociation displayed their work 
last weekend for the first time 
this year. From Thursday to 
Sunday, Room 108 Hathron was 
cleared of its customary clutter 
in order to make room for an at- 



SEA MEETING 
All members of the Stu- 
dent Education Association 
are reminded of the up -com- 
ing meeting to be held next 
Tuesday evening at 7:00 
p.m. at Dr. Cummins' home, 
32 Frye Street. A panel of 
Bates seniors who spent their 
junior year abroad will dis- 
cuss their experiences as 
foreign students. 

Interested non -members are 
welcome to attend. 



Choral Society, Soloists To Present 

Christmas Concert This Sunday 




tractive display of the results of 
eight weeks of student work. 

As a visitor entered the room 
he was met by the aroma of 
fresh coffee, the sound of De- 
bussey's "La Mer" and the col- 
lection of oils, water colors, ink 
drawings and clay sculptures, of 
sixteen Bates students who ex- 
hibited approximately fifty 
works. 

Among the best were a num- 
ber of ink sketches by Phyllis 
Schindel; Lee Pollock's two in- 
triguing clay sculptures; Mary- 
ellen Keenan's watercolors of 
impressive skill and charm; and 
Brian Deevy's mobile, "Flying 
Fish," which was made of sea 
weed and feathers, hung near 
the door. The Association's ad- 
visor, Dr. George Goldat, exhib- 
ited a copper-colored clay sculp- 
ture, "Homo Religioso" and four 
tempera studies of a mountain at 
different times of day. The dif- 
ferent lights dictated very dif- 
ferent styles. 



The Choral 

The Choral Society will pre- 
sent its Christmas Concert on 
Sunday, December 8, in the 
Chapel. There will be two per- 
formances: one at 3:30 and the 
other at 7:30; free admission to 

each. One of the major works to 
be sung will be the Mass In G 
by Franz Schubert (1797-1828). 
Soloists in this will be Deborah 
Perkins, Sandra Hoot Cook, 



Society which will perform twice Sunday 

Richard W. Myers, and Peter Kindelein by 



Allen. D. Robert Smith will 
conduct and Barbara Reed is the 
organist. 

Next a group of shorter works 

will be heard, beginning with 
En Natus Est Emanuel by Mich- 
ael Praetorius (1571 - 1621). 
Richard W. Myers, assistant li- 
brarian, will then sing the Cana- 
ta for tenor solo: Ein Kleines 



Franz Tunder 
(1614-1667). An octet will sing 
"A Child My Choice", a carol 
composed by Richard Dirksen, 
organist of the National Cathe- 
dral in Washington, D. C. to a 
text by Robert Southwell (1561- 
1595). 

The concert will conclude 
with the Motet "Jesus, Priceless 
Treasure" by Johann Sebastian 
Bach (1685-1750). 



CA Gives Party 
For Local Kids 

A visit from old St. Nick, 
along with songs and refresh- 
ments, will highlight the annual 
Christian Association Christmas 
party for underprivileged chil- 
dren from the Lewiston area 
this Friday afternoon. 

As part of their Community 
Service Program, which also in- 
cludes work trips, and volunteer 
assistance at the Pineland Men- 
tal Hospital and the Central 
Maine General Hospital, the CA 
will transport approximately 30 
youngsters into a transformed 
Chase Hall. Complete with a 
tree, decorations, and ice cream 
and cake, the affair will run 
from three-thirty until five p.m. 
Santa (Prof. Wait) Claus 

Prof. Wait will perform, as 
usual, as Santa Claus and give 
each child a small gift. 

Program chairwoman this year 
is Linda Taylor '66. Assisting her 
are Beth Bassett '66, Judy Bushy 
'66, Penny Brown '66, Ellen Han- 
sen '66 and Sally Voigt '66. 



Boyd Wins Contest; 
Hall Is Second, 
Prohl Third 

A small audience in the Little 
Theatre last Monday heard a 
scathing denunciation of "the 
moral climate in which we live." 
The speaker was Robert Boyd 
'64, who won first place in the 
annual oratorical contest. 

Beginning with an examina- 
tion of the basketball scandals 
of two years ago, Boyd went on 
to examine a wide range of ac- 
tions and events, supporting his 
thesis that each man must rea- 
lize his personal involvement in 
the problem of morality and in 
the need to correct this problem 
Also speaking in the contest 
were Thomas Hall '64, Norman 
Gillespie '64, and Sandra Prohl 
'64. Hall, who took second place, 
pointed out "the danger we live 
in" with regard to the U.S. 
House Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities. He called for the 
abolition of this Congressional 
body. 

Prohl asked her audience to 
"support educational television", 
and took third place; while Gil- 
lespie spoke on the civil rights 
problem in the United States. 
He emphasized the vital need for 
awakening to and removing 
"color-consciousness" from our 
way of life. 



Dance Theme Is Old 
Fashioned Christmas 

The Dunster Dunces, a Har- 
vard singing group, and the 
Duane Nyles Combo will be 
the featured entertainment at 
the Christmas Dance, December 
7. Traditionally held a week be- 
fore Christmas recess, it is one 
of the few semi-formal affairs 
held on campus. Projected by the 
sophomore class, the chosen 
theme is year is "An Old-Fash- 
ioned Christmas". 

The recreation room down- 
stairs in Chase Hall will be 
turned into a sitting lounge 
complete with roaring fires, hol- 
ly, and mistletoe. 

The tickets for the dance are 
on sale now in Commons, Rand 
Hall, and in the dormitories. The 
cost is $2.50 per couple. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Dec. 4 

Registration for Spring Se- 
mester begins 
WAA Meeting, W. U, 6:30 
p. m. 

Vespers, 9:30, Chapel 

Thursday. Dec. 5 
Bio-Dept. Lecturer, 122 Car- 
negie, 8:00 p.m. 

Friday, Dec. 6 
Cent. Speaker, W. U., 3-5:30 

Saturday, Dec. 7 
Soph Class Dance, Chase Hall, 
8-11:45 

Open House after dance, W. U., 
11-1 

Sunday, Dec. 8 
Christmas Concert, Chapel, 
3:30-5, 7:30-9 



7f 

TWO 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



« 



Perkins School's 
Heisler Speaks To 
Education Classes 

The resources, achievements, 
methods, and principles used by 
Perkins School for the Blind to 
educate the blind and teachers 
of the blind were described to- 
day. Mr. William Heisler, Direc- 
tor of Teacher Education at Per- 
kins, in order to interest Bates 
students in the field of educat- 
ing the blind, presented a movie 
and short talk before two edu- 
cation classes. 

Mr. Heisler's talk was espe- 
cially valuable to graduating 
students now choosing a career. 
A movie, The Perkins Story, in- 
troduced the classes to the field 
of special education of excep- 
tional children, and described 
the impressive, well-endowed 
school at Watertown, Mass. 

Mr. Heisler added some com- 
ments on the cooperative, two 
year teaching training program 
for the blind and deaf blind, be- 
tween Perkins and Boston Uni- 
versity. 

Several Bates graduates can 
already testify to the calibre of 
Perkins School and its teacher 
training program. Doug Wake- 
field '64 is a graduate of Perkins 
while fifteen Bates graduates in 
the last several years have gone 
to Perkins to become teachers of 
the blind or school administra- 
tors. 

Several Bates participants 
have afterwards gone overseas to 
teach the blind while others have 
studied the psychology of the 
blind. 

Perkins School, begun in 1829, 
can refer to its record to illus- 
trate the value of educating the 
blind, deaf-blind, and teachers 
of them. It is widely known for 
its pioneering work in develop- 
ing methods of teaching the 
blind. Its program is designed to 
affect the children's handicaps 
as it works towards their social 
adjustment. Thus it teaches 
grades one through twelve and 
includes all normal recreational 
activities. Even a modified pro- 
gram of sports is offered, not- 
ably touch football and wrestl- 
ing. 

Two of its most famous grad- 
uates and teachers are Laura 
Bridgeman and Anne Sullivan, 
who both testify to the success 
of Perkins in education and in 
preparation of the blind for 
worthwhile, happy lives. 



Notes From Underground 



WARD'S TV In&_ 
COLOR and BLACK and WHITE 



Complete Line of 
Transistor Radios and Stereos 

2 88 Lisbon St., Lew. 782-3711 

+ + 
"HOTEL HOLLY- 
BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 
Main Street Lewiston 

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LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 
Coin-Operated 

DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 

- Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



Tuesday, Nov. 26, 1963 
The meeting was called to or- 
der at 6: 10 p. m. in Libbey 11. 

Absentees: Cruickshank, Stein - 
heimer. 
Guests: Planchon, Pethick. 
Planchon handed out the per- 
sonality tests which the Senators 
agreed to take and return next 
week. 

Committee Reports 

Elections: Freshman elections 
will be held this Friday from 9 
to 4 in the Alumni Gym. 

Busses and Rallies: There will 
be a rally on December 2 for the 
basketball team. 

Al Pethick asked the Senate 
for an ad for The Mirror. Aik- 
man moved that we take a $40 
ad. This was passed. It was sug- 
gested that Mr. Pethick approach 
Women's Council and Men's 
Council for ads to make a full 
page ad from the three organiza- 
tions. 

Dobson moved that we take 
the motion which was tabled last 
week from the table and onto 
the floor for discussion. This 
was passed. The amendment to 



have the committee consist of 
one member from the Senate 
plus a chairman from the Sen- 
ate, as well as the treasurers 
from the other organizations 
was passed. 

The President after a short 
discussion called for a vote on 
the motion as amended. The mo- 
tion was passed. As it now 
reads as amended, the motion 
(passed) is that The Senate set 
up a committee consisting of the 
treasurers of the all-campus ac- 
tivities, one member from the 
Senate (assumed to be the trea- 
surer) and a non-voting chair- 
man who will be from the Sen- 
ate. 

This committee will look into 
the apportionment of the Stu- 
dent Activities Fee and the 
"sinking funds" in a "general 
and indefinite way". The chair- 
man will be appointed at a fu- 
ture meeting of the Senate. 

The next meeting of the Sen- 
ate will be on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 3, at 6 p. m. 

The meeting adjourned at 
6:50 p. m. 



Guidance 



INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 

Mr. Francis H. Duelay will in- 
terview undergraduates and se- 
niors interested in the Master of 
Arts in Teaching Programs at 
HARVARD GRADUATE 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. He 
will be on campus Tuesday, De- 
cember 10. All seniors and other 
students interested in MAT Pro- 
grams should see Professor Ken- 
dall, Room 303, Pettigrew. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Material is available at the 
Guidance and Placement Office 
about current openings in 
STANDARD OIL CO. Liberal 
Arts majors are needed in Sales 
and Management. 

Information on a full-tuition 
scholarship in the Executive 
Secretarial Course for College 
Women at the BERKELEY 
SCHOOL (East Orange, N. J., 
White Plains, N. Y., New York, 
N. Y.) is available at the Place- 
ment Office. This scholarship is 
open to women seniors in lib- 
eral arts colleges. 



BIOLOGY MAJORS 

Dr. David E. Bass, Scientific 
Director of the U.S. Army Re- 
search Institute of Environmen- 
tal Medicine at Natick, Mass., 
will visit the Bates campus on 
the 5th and 6th of December. 
He will speak to all interested 
students on Thursday, Decem- 
ber 5, at 8 p. m., in Room 122 of 
Carnegie. 

His topic will be the career 
possibilities involving biological 
research n government institu- 
tions, introduced by a considera- 
tion of the nature of the activi- 
ties of the institute of which he 
is director. 

He will talk to the Physiology 
class on Thursday morning on 
the subject of temperature reg- 
ulation, and to the Comprative 
Vertebrate Morphology class on 
Friday afternoon on the sub- 
ject of Medical Research — 
without an M.D. Any interested 
students are invited to attend 
these classes as their schedule 
permits. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: FRANK FRASIER 



Frank Frasier (B.A., 1960) helps see to it that the phones 
of 60,000 customers stay in top working order. Frank is 
Foreman-Service for New England Telephone in Somer- 
ville, Massachusetts. 

What's a liberal-arts graduate doing in such a technical- 
sounding position? "Exercising his supervisory ability," 
is the answer in Frank's case. Frank's is a management 
job— his 9 craftsmen handle the technical aspects for him. 




Frank earned his latest promotion after proving him- 
self on a staff job in Arlington, Massachusetts. And with 
the spark he's showing on his new job, Frank's future with 
New England Telephone Company is bright. 

Frank Frasier, like many young men, is impatient to 
make things happen for his company and himself. There 
are few places where such restlessness is more welcomed 
or rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 




BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



THr^EE 



OC Equipment Available 
To Help You Enjoy Maine 

By IRWIN FLASHMAN '65 

The Bates campus is surrounded by some very beautiful 
scenery and many historical sites. The nearby lakes and 
many woodland trails offer to anyone who is interested a 
place to relax in the outdoors. 

To help you enjoy these areas, 
the Bates Outing Club main- 
tains an equipment room for 
student and faculty use. It is lo- 
cated in the basement of East j skis may be purchased for a 
Parker and is open from 4:00 to! small price. Since things do wear 
5:00 p.m. on Monday, Wednes- out or are broken, the O.C. has 
day and Friday. If you find that a complete workbench for the 
you need something at another maintenance of all its equip- 



of winter weather equipment. 
This includes skiing gear, tobog- 
gans, and snowshoes. Waxes for 




Inside the OC Equipment Room 



time, contact Val Wilson or Paul 
Ketchum, the directors of the 
equipment room. 

Equipment of All Types 

In the equipment room you 
can find just about anything and 
everything you might use in the 
outdoors. Sleeping bags, tarpau- 
lins, tents, packs, coaching gear, 
axes, saws, climbing rope, and 
more are all available. There 
are bicycles for anyone who en- 
joys this type of recreational ex- 
ercise. 

Of course, since we are here 
in Maine, we have an abundance 



EMPIRE PL N A °7 MG j 

Paul Newman j 
Joanne Woodward j 
Maurice Chevalier j 

in ! 

'A New Kind of 
Love" 

!Sun.,-Mon.-Tues.— 

Robert Mitchum 
Elsa Mariinelli 

in 

"RAMPAGE" 



IIILI Ull mi l urn him urn 

1 III! ill HmH 



Mtii<iiia'.j 



PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 

"Barabbas" 

Anthony Quinn 

VlTTORIO GASSMAN 

Jack Palance 

"Showdown" 

Audie Murphy 
Kathleen Crowley 
Charles Drake 
Harold J. Stone 
Skip Homeier 
L. Q. Jones 
Strother Martin 
Carol Thurston 

Continuous Fri. from 5 p.m. 

Sat. from 1 p. m. 
Sun. from 3 p. m. 



ment. 

There is a $1.00 deposit on 
each article borrowed. This is 
to encourage you to return 
equipment promptly, so that 
others might use it. The deposit 
is, of course, returned when the 
article is brought back. 

Ski boots are the only things 
for which a rental fee is 
charged. The charge is 75c for 
each rental period. This period 
is from the day that the article 
is borrowed until the next day 
that the equipment room is 
opened. The reason for this is 
that new boots were purchased. 

Come in and browse around. 
We have a number of magazines 
and books on all phases of out- 
door life and the equipment is 
waiting to be used. 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main St. Lewiston 

Next to Bus Terminal 



IIRR 



i 



Ritz Theatre 

| Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.— 

I "TO CATCH 
I A THIEF". 

CARY GRANT 
GRACE KELLY 

* 

I "VERTIGO" 

I JAMES STEWART 
KIM NOVAK 



Closed Wednesdays — I 



faiilliii^ fllltllllllllll Ill 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ft 



NEW VOICES 

By JOHN HOLT *64 

"Theatre for Pleasure or Thea- 
tre for Learning?" 

The above words are borrowed 
from the title of an essay by 
Bertolt Brecht. They ask a 
question that is too often 
glossed over, tacitly assumed, or 
semantically rejected. 

What's the big problem? — 
"These modern playwrights are 
sick; they don't present a true 
picture of life; the plays are dis- 
gusting, depressing, dirty, and 
worthless." — The problem isn't 
the new plays; the problem is 
the people that insist on taking 
this unimaginative, simple, 
trite, and unreflective attitude. 
The assumption that lies behind 
this attitude is that the theatre's 
purpose is essentially to give 
pleasure, emotional or intellect- 
ual. 

This assumption makes mod- 
ern drama unreal for a lot of 
people. Dreams and nightmares 
are not "real" either, except 
maybe when you see them in the 
streets. Like a student commit- 
ting suicide, or mentally decom- 
posing, or anything else that 
isn't nice. "But these are excep- 
tional things, and not only that, 
they happen universally and in 
every age." Yes. they do, but 
every age hasn't quite been like 
this one. 

What's the real problem? — 
Maybe it's trying to find out 
just why this "age" is somewhat 
unique in world history — why 
this "age" could never produce 
a Shakespeare. Instead, it has 
produced an Albee (dirty word), 
a Beckett, an Iionesco, a Sartre, 
a Williams, a Brecht. Why? An- 
other good N question. The writ- 
ers themselves ask it; in fact, 
the writers are asking a lot of 
questions. Most of them are fo- 
cused on defining the problem — 
for it seems that there is defi- 
nitely a problem. 

Before Ibsen (a reasonable 
starting - point for modern 
drama), Nothing permitted the 
audience any more to lose itself 
through simple identification, un- 
crilicaly (and without any prac- 
tical consequences), in the ex- 
periences of the characters on the 
stage. The presentation exposed 
the subject matter and the hap- 
penings to a process of aliena- 
tion. Alienation was required to 
make things understood. When 
things are "self-evident", under- 
standing is simply dispensed 
with. — Brecht. 

We can "enjoy" Ibsen today. 
When he first came out there 
were misgivings, to say the 
least. Twenty years ago he was 
the rage. Today he is one of the 
classics. Ibsen, carried to his il- 
logical, nonsensical, passionate 
conclusion, is Albee. (?!) 

The theatre is NOT simply a 
place for entertainment, plea- 
sure, and satisfaction. It can be 
these things, but it can (hope- 
fully) be even more. 

". . . the lust for learning is de- 
pendent on various things; in 
short, there is such a thing as 
thrilling learning, joyous and 
militant learning. 

If learning could not be de- 
lightful, then the theatre, by 
its very structure, would not 
be in a position to instruct. 

Theatre remains theatre, even, 
when it is didactic theatre, 
and insofar as it is good thea- 
tre, it will entertain." 

— Brecht 

For those who disagree with 
these ideas, or see a fallacy in 
the thinking, I welcome criti- 
cism. 



The Plato Twist Or A 
Canticle For Cavemen 




The Source of Daily Reality 



By JOHN BART '64 

"Here is an illustration of the 
extent to which our natures and 
those of men may be enlightened 
or unenlightened. Perhaps this 
story will help you to understand 
the idea I have in mind. Picture 
the condition of men living in a 
sort of cavernous structure un- 
derground like a cave or an ani- 
mal's den. 

"They slump on benches and 
find it extremely difficult and 
unpleasant to move in any way. 
At one end of the chamber is 
the only thing which seems to 
have any motion or life. This is 
a box full of lights, some of 
which move and are colored. 
Also from time to time certain 
noises come out of this box." 
"I see," said he. 
"Now these noises seem to be 
the only thing in which these 
people seem to take any interest. 
When they start, the people sit 
up on their benches, their feet 
start to move, sometimes their 
bodies writhe, and their eyes be- 
come glazed and see less than 
usual. In other words, they seem 
to have their attention on some- 
thing, and that something must 
be these desultory noises." 
"So it must," said he. 

The Only Reality 

"Now since these noises are 
the only thing these people at- 
tend to, it would seem that for 
them they are the only reality. 
They and the moving colored 
lights." 
"Of course," said he. 
"And would not he who 
seemed to know the most about 
these noises and could perhaps 
even command them once in a 
while have the most honor 
among these people?" 
"I would think so." 
"Now suppose one of these 



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people made the almost impossi- 
ble effort and got off his bench 
and walked out of this cavern. 
Or as is perhaps more likely, 
suppose one of them was forced 
to. Would he not be vexed at 
having been disturbed and also 
at the way the light of the sun 
hurt his eyes?" 

"He would indeed be vexed." 

"But would he. after a while 
at least, begin to realise that 
there were brighter lights than 
those on the box inside and 
other noises than the ones 
which it made? That is, if he 
were reasonably intelligent?" 

"He would." 

Return to the Cave 

"And wouldn't he want to 
show this new world to the other 
people who are still in the cav- 
ern attending to the box and its 
noises?" 

"Yes." 

"Then he would go back into 
the cavern and attempt to lead 
them out into the fight, would he 
not?" 

"He would." 

"And would they not be vexed 
at being disturbed just as he 
was?" 

"I should think so." 

"And what would they do to be 
free of him and peaceful again? 
Would they not at the least ban- 
ish him to the bookstore? And 
might they not even laugh at him 
ot perhaps kill him? That is, so 
that they could rest on their 
benches again." 

"Truly, I think they would be 
capable of any of those things to 
preserve their way of life." 

"And what would be the re- 
sult of all this? Would it not be 
that one man would end up in 
the cold?" 

"So it would seem." 



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Phone 4-7521 Lewiston, Maine 
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FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



Editorials 

| Thanksgiving 

Thanksgiving has ceased to be a vital issue on campus but 
the effects of abolishing the four day recess are still being 
felt. Now, four years after the institution of a one day holi- 
day, might be an excellent time for a review of this policy. 

At any college, on a two semester program, the period from 
September to Thanksgiving, or Christmas, as the case may 
be, is always the longest and, in many ways, the worst 
stretch in the academic year. In particular, the freshmen, 
who must attend all their classes, and who are being initiat- 
ed into college work, find this period most tedious. Whatever 
spirit they bring to college is effectively deadened during 
this grind. 

At Bates, attendance at Winter Carnival, held on the 
weekend between semesters, has been steadily declining 
since 1960. Whether there is any correlary between the lack 
of a Thanksgiving recess and this decline in attendance, we 
do not know. But it does not seem unlikely that students be- 
ing denied a respite in November, are taking it in January. 

What the solution may be, we are not sure, but the situa- 
tion would be improved by a change in the cut system. At 
any other time during the semester a student may use his 
cuts to go home. But during the very week-end when a stu- 
dent would most like to be with family and friends, this 
privilege (or is it a right?) is denied. 

Yes, "academic continuity" would be disrupted if a large 
number of students used their cuts at this time. But if a 
student wishes to sacrifice an hour in each course, in order 
to spend Thanksgiving at home, shouldn't this be his deci- 
sion? *And if enough students make this decision, shouldn't 
it become the college policy? 



Letters To The Editor 



What Can We Expect? 

The Student Senate protest of the decision on the recent 
Colloquia was received at a recent faculty meeting and 
promptly dismissed, without a single word of discussion. 

The faculty did not deign it proper even to acknowledge 
the Senate protest. This lack of courtesy is demeaning to the 
faculty and the students. 

This failure to consider student thinking serves only to 

widen the breach between students and faculty — and to 

perpetuate the feck of communication between the two 
groups. 

By sending this protest, the Senate hoped to have the fac- 
ulty discuss their action in light of the student sentiment, 
possibly reach a consensus regarding future decisions. But 
what students can expect in the future, has been made pain- 
fully clear. 



^Bates w Student 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Alan Hartwell '66 Photographer 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel *66, Linda Mitchell *66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 

Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall. Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-6661. Printed at Auburn Free Press. 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30. 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3. 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



From Spain 
To the Editor: 

Even though I find myself 
5,000 miles away from the loca- 
tion of President Kennedy's 
death, I feel a grief- stricken at- 
mosphere surrounding me here, 
in Madrid, Spain. Three days of 
mourning have been officially 
declared. 

The people of Spain feel great 
love and respect for the late 
President, and sought the world's 
salvation in him. There is now a 
feeling of dismay and fear 
about the future of the world. 

The shock to Americans (stu- 
dents, diplomats, army person- 
nel) here was severe — first of 
disbelief and then of helpless- 
ness. To be an American all of 
a sudden seemed very import- 
ant. A memorial service was 
held this morning at the Ameri- 
can embassy. 

It was comforting to know 
that my sorrow was shared by 
so many, and that these were 
part of a great American peo- 
ple. On these people rests a 
great deal of the responsibility 
for America's future; a bright 
future Kennedy initiated in 
three short years. 

James Corey '63 



Death of a President 
To the Editor: 

In the wake of tragedy 

Hathorn Bell 

Tolls 

In sincere respect 

To a magnanimous leader. 

Grief 

Is 

Conducted more quickly 
In a sensitive nation 
Than N 
Heat in copper 
Or 

Electricity in silver. 

The ugly molecules symbolizing 

Death 

From an assassin 

Have been imbedded 

Deep 

And 

Hot 

In our nation. 

The campus is silent 

As if each relative creature 

Had been informed 

That 

Its terrestrial creator 
Ceased to 
Breathe 

The air of freedom 

So plentiful 

In our democracy. 

No faces can be seen 

In Horizontal respect 

To the earth. 

Actions 

Are limited — 

Movement 

Is at a minimum. 

Does 

Not 

God 

Work 

In 

Strange 
Ways 
??? 

Malcolm P. Reid '67 



Cult of Courage 
To the Editor: 

It is curious to find that here 
in the U.S. the toreador can 
compete with agents of a God 
whose nature is dominated by 
love, because the cult of stark 
courage incarnated by the bull- 
fighter is a narrow specializa- 
tion which condemns a people to 
stagnation; a relatively low level 
of existence. 

The cult of courage is natural, 
indeed inevitable, in Spain, for 



it is a chief factor in survival in 
such a semi-desert land. But 
this cult goes far to explain why 
Hispanic society consists mostly 
of people so poor that life ex- 
pectancy is only half that in the 
U.S.: unnecessary suffering and 
early death face the great ma- 
jority. 

One of Chesterton's last essays 
said, "Look at Spain, you 
Yankees who are so proud of 
rugged individualism!" And he 
was right: pride, especially on 
the part of men who are power- 
ful, condemns whole peoples to 
misery and insignificance. 

And yet, not long ago, when 
I spoke of love as the best cause 
for prayer, a sceptic gibed that 
one turns to God because of 
fear. I had said, "It is when you 
really love that you are stabbed 
by the knowledge that all you 
can do is to pray, hoping that 
God's healing touch will come 
tothe one whose suffering you 
long to relieve, — but you know 
you are utterly powerless. 

"Perhaps if He finds you so 
deeply concerned, eager to be an 
instrument of His love, He will 
send His grace more effectively 
than as though you were inert 
and hopeless." 

To this the sceptic retorted, 
"Yes, you turn to prayer when 
your love has chickened out!", 
apparently entirely failing to 
understand that love is utterly 
unconcerned about a pose of 
brave defiance. The champion of 
courage seemed to be satisfied to 
declare, "I can be brave without 
God!" Probably he can, but, 
"Can the toreador contribute 
much to giving life the joyful 
fullness it should have?" His- 
panic statistics say, "No!" 

One might say that some peo- 
ple want to be marbles: smooth, 
quick, often beautiful, but al- 
ways hard and alone. "Real per- 
sons," however, are glad to be 
more and more linked with 
other people in a society which 
seems good to all who live in it. 

Robert Seward 



A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

Georgie, Porgie, Puddin' Pie 
Spoke to the students and made 

them cry. 
Just as they were ready to play, 
Georgie Porgie got in the way! 

A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

Mary has an overcut 
But doesn't seem to care. 
The college threw a party 
And Mary wasn't there. 

A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

Little Miss Muffled sat on a 
campus 

Baking a HUNDRED year cake. 
But the cake fell . . . 
What the Hell! 

A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

Dearest Bates College, Dearest 

Bates College, 
How do your students grow? 
The crop seems poor from what 

we see here, 
But maybe it's just a bad year? 

A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

When the pie was opened 
We all began to shout — 
Once you had him in there, 
Why ... did you let him out??? 

A tisket, a taskit, 

Again WE Ask IT — WHY??? 

Members of the Bored 



The Truth 

To the Editor of 
The Bates STUDENT: 

On behalf of a number of ex- 
perienced journalists, and as one 
who desires to emphasize the 
urgent need for high quality 
writing in all publications, in- 
cluding that of a college newspa- 
per, I would like to commend 
one of your staff members. 

In the November 27, 1963 is- 
sue of the STUDENT, there ap- 
peared an article entitled 
"Steve's Scripts" by Steve Bar- 
ron '64. May I quote? "This is 
sickening Steve, your repulsive 
reporter . . ." 

In any journalistic endeavor, 
truth must be maintained at all 
costs, and may I say for many 
that Mr. Barron most precisely 
expressed the truth — at all 
costs. 

Sincerely, 

A non-Bates Student 



Nursery Time 

To the Editor: 

Sing a song of Penitence, 

A bottle full of rye, 

We've seen the smiling wonder 

Baked into a pie! 

A tisket, a taskit, 
Againweaskit, WHY? 

Hickory, Dickory Dock, 

The faculty own the clock. 

They sit on their hands 

And formulate plans 

Ignoring the students who knock. 



BATES 1964 

To the Editor: 

As Ed Gray came striding out 
of Chase Hall on a cool autumn 
day, he was stopped by a 
stranger. 

Stranger: May I ask you a 

question or two? 

Ed: O.K., if you don't take 
long; I'm in a hurry. 

Stranger: Where are you head- 
ed? 

Ed: To the chapel for our 
apathy assembly. 

Stranger: Why? 

Ed: If I don't I'll get a cut and 
we're only allowed eleven. Be- 
sides, it's traditional. 

Stranger: Why are you here 
at Bates? 

Ed: I dunno; to get an educa- 
tion, I guess. That's what Big 
Prexy always tells us. 

Stranger: And what is the 
purpose of an education? 

Ed: It helps you get a good job, 
and with a good job you can 
make more money than with a 
poor one. Money brings you se- 
curity, prestige, and more money 
when you invest it. Big Prexy is 
very good at this. Did you know 
that everyone who makes Dean's 
List gets five Green Stamp books 
automatically, and the first page 
in each one is already filled? 

Stranger: No, I didn't know 
that, but let me ask you another 
question: Does getting an educa- 
tion give you satisfaction? 

Ed: What an odd question! I 
thought everyone knew that one 
goes to college to get a job. No, 
I don't enjoy studying; it's a 
grind, a rat-race. But it has to 
be done to get a good job. In 
fact, that's why we have a three- 
year plan now, so we can get a 
job faster. Years ago Big Prexy 
had this idea for Bates' Great 
Leap Forward. We all love Big 
Prexy; that is, all except the 
cubes. 

Stranger: What are cubes? 
(Continued on page five) 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



17 

FIVE 



SOUTH OF PARIS 




By PETER REICH '65 

22 Nov., Grenoble 

"It is a contradiction in 
terms," said the professor, "for 
students to strike." The Profess- 
or was discussing Rimbaud at 
the time, but the implications of 
his statement were not limited to 
Rimbaud's letter of May 13. 

Last week, November 25-30, 
students in universities all over 
France ont fait la greve in pro- 
test against the adverse condi- 
tions in the French University 
today. The facts speak for them- 
selves. 

There are 15,000 students at 
Grenoble. 

In University Dormitories, or 
cites there are only 1525 rooms 
now available. Five thousand, 
eight hundred students live at 
home, and 7,600 have rooms by 
private arrangement — and the 
prices are skyrocketing. 

Consequently, there is and 
has been a problem of finding 
rooms in the city. Many stu- 
dents have had to leave Greno- 
ble because they could not find 
rooms. 

Work has not yet begun on a 
University restaurant promised 
for October 1964, but which will 
not be finished until 1965. An- 
other restaurant, capable of 
feeding 550, supposed to have 



been completed in 1958, may be 
ready in October 1964. 

The result of this delay is that 
there are only five university 
restaurants presently function- 
ing. These restaurants can feed 
a maximum of 5,000 students 
at each meal. The queues are 
long and massive, and one must 
often wait half an hour in line 
before eating lunch. And only 
if one is lucky, does he sit. 
Many students eat standing up, 
or sitting on radiators. 

Not only does the government 
not pay — as it should — for 
the completion of the cites and 
restaus, but many students have 
still not received their scholar- 
ship money. 

The students have had 
enough, and their complaints 
are justified. Something has to 
be done — and yet one cannot ig- 
nore the statement that a student 
strike is a contradiction in 
terms. 

One group, composed largely 
of communist and socialist or- 
ganizations are sponsoring a 
rally tonight, protesting the 
build up of France's "Force de 
Frappe." The money which 
should go to the students is go- 
ing into the production of 
bombs which may ultimately be 
the destruction of the restaus 
and cites. 




Librarian Myers at Reference Desk 



Modulations 



By LAUREL BOOTH '66 

WRJR can look forward to 
another broadcasting year over 
the air waves. Thanks to inter- 
ested supporters the radio sta- 
tion realized a profit of $600. We 
wish to thank all those connect- 
ed with the campaign, especially 
the solocitors. 

Last Tuesday evening found 
twenty-four maidens of second 
floor Page, best contributors to 
the drive, enjoying the highly 
publicized steak dinner. As an 
added touch, they were capably 
served by Bruce Cooper '65, Ted 
Foster '65, Dan Clarke '65, and 
Dick Dow '64 as singing waiters, 
no less. 

Plan to listen to the Master- 
works Hour tomorrow, Decem- 
ber 5, from 8-10 p.m., which 
will present Benjamin Britten's 
A War Requiem. Britten's mas- 
terpiece made its American de- 
but at Tanglewood this past 
summer and will run the circuit 
of major cities during the fall. 
Its text contains an alteration of 
a Mass for the Dead and poems 



TV RENTALS - SALES 

Free Deliver- 
BATES ELECTRONICS 

783-2269 
783-0308 



by Wilfred Owen. In essence, it 
serves as a denunciation against 
World War II, asking that such 
destruction and horror never 
recur. Considered another 
Beethoven's Fifth by many 
critics, A War Requiem is a lis- 
tening must. 

A handbook for preparation 
for third-class license is on re- 
serve in Coram Library. This 
booklet, published by the F.C.C., 
is available to WRJR staff mem- 
bers to prepare for the exam. 
Every staff member should ex- 
amine the booklet. It is suggest- 
ed that staff members could 
take the license examination 
over Christmas vacation. It can 
be taken at any local F.C.C. ra- 
dio station. In addition, the 
handbook is available at these 
same stations. 



Lantern Room 
- Bert's Drive-In - 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 




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Sabattus St 
Daily 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 



Myers Brings Varied 
Background To Bates 



By SUE LORD '66 

The new executive-type man 
presiding over the reference 
room of Coram Library is Mr. 
Richard W. Myers. The new as- 
sistant librarian and head of the 
reference room comes to Bates 
after a varied background of li- 
brary work, extensive travel and 
independent study. 

Myers received his B.A. from 
Houghton College in New York 
and an M.L.S. from Rutgers Uni- 
versity. During that same time, 
he also studied voice and opera 
for six years. In 1961, Myers and 
his wife and daughter went to 
Milan, Italy, to live for a year, 
enabling him to study opera and 
Italian. He reports that Milan is 
worse than London for fog, but 
since the advantages of a big city 
outweigh the disadvantages, at 
least for the study of opera, he 
remained in Milan. 

"Opera requires a peculiar tal- 
ent — not just brains, but a cer- 
tain temperament, personality, 
and physical stamina. The study 
of opera is grueling. It is not 
like the study of a musical in- 
strument. For opera one must 
practice in short spurts of con- 
centration." 

The constant hectic environ- 
ment, temperamental prima don- 
nas, and lack of stability caused 
Myers to go back to library 
work. However, "you sometimes 
put your whole life into it 
(opera) before realizing that the 
goal isn't as delightful as it 
seemed." 

Studying opera, library work, 
and teaching was quite a strug- 
gle and required a tremendous 
amount of money. Library work 
gives Myers the leisure time to 
read and to enjoy a quiet home 
life, and allows him to work and 
associate with people. 

Before coming to Bates, the 
new librarian served in many 
capacities. He has worked at 
Briar Clift Manor, Croughton- 
on-Hudson, and in Concord, New 
Hampshire as a state librarian. 
When asked why he came to 
Bates he replied, "Since there 
was a lot of politics in the state 

STERLING PATTERNS I 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt j 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 





Dial 784-5241 



library and since I'm not the 
politician type, I wanted to get 
into college-level work." 

About his job at Bates he 
says, "I love it; it's the best one 
I've had. I have something here 
that I couldn't buy while per- 
forming in opera." 

Myers has studied three for- 
eign languages — French, Ger- 
man, and Italian. Mountain 
climbing and foreign travel also 
appeal to him. In fact his net va- 
cation will probably be a tour 
of the Orient. 

Bates students will get an op- 
portunity to hear Myers sing at 
the Christmas Concert on De- 
cember 8. 



WUS Stress Self 
Help, Cooperation 

By LINDA GLAZER '65 
The World University Service 
organization is a cooperative ef- 
fort on the part of the university 
community to explore and meet 
common needs. WUS objectives 
are to meet the basic needs of 
higher education and to foster 
cooperation and understanding 
between the university commun- 
ities of all nations. 

WUS is NOT a charity, but 
rather operates on the principal 
of self-help. Any WUS project 
must receive at least fifty per- 
cent of its funds from the partic- 
ipating country. This money is 
raised either by the students or 
given by that government. Al- 
most all WUS projects are built 
by the students who will benefit. 
These projects are in the fields 
of student lodging and living 
(dormitories and hostels), stu- 
dent health, library and text- 
book facilities, and individual 
and emergency aid. 

This year the 'funds gathered 
on the Bates campus will go to- 
wards the WUS-UNESCO proj- 
ects in Africa. One of the big- 
gest problems in these university 
campuses is the exhorbitant 
price of textbooks and limited 
supply to be found in the native 
language. WUS helps the stu- 
dents to set up a printing busi- 
ness, thus giving the student ac- 
cess to textbooks at a reasonable 
price. 

The WUS drive has begun and 
only YOU can help to support 
it. A small sacrifice on your part 
will mean a great help to many 
students around the world. Sup- 
port WUS by contributing now 
and pledging additional help in 
the Spring. Pledge before De- 
cember 10. 



Letter To The Editor 

(Continued from page four) 
Ed: Three dimensional squares, 
natch. 

Stranger: What happens to 
students who don't want to get 
a job in a hurry or who don't 
know what their major field of 
interest is yet, the ones who 
don't want to be rushed? 

Ed: You've just described the 
cubes. Lots of things happen to 
them. First they have to go talk 
to the Minister of Love who re- 
peats to them the speech he gives 
to all Freshmen, (segregated by 
sex of course), the one about 
what a fantastic fiscal future 
they will have if they stop ask- 
ing themselves questions about 
what they want to do or what 
the meaning of life is, and in- 
stead, buckle down to work. 

He tells them they're too im- 
mature to make decisions and 
that they shouldn't question Big 
Prexy's policies, because Big 
Prexy will take care of them. He 
knows what is best for them. 

But this doesn't cure very 
many cubes because they're too 
obstinate. Some go to the psy- 
chiatrists at the infirmary, but 
they don't have much faith in 
them. "Their judgment is poor 
and they really don't care about 
the students' health anyway," is 
what the cubes say. But they're 
wrong because Big Prexy told 
us one day that the doctors are 
very competent. 

Three years ago, eight stu- 
dents were taken away to the 
State Mental Hospital and five 
committed suicide. Last year the 
figures were 13 and 7 respective- 
ly. But these are the cubes and 
they don't really count anyway. 
The good students don't have 
any trouble because they listen 
to Big Prexy and do what he tells 
them. They'll do well when 
they graduate. 

Oh Prexy! there's the doggone 
second bell! Because I've been 
wasting time answering these 
dumb questions I've got to run, 
and I hate to run; it's too much 
effort. But before I go, here's a 
quotation from Big Prexy that 
I found in an old 1963 Portland 
Press Herald. It shows what a 
successful prediction he made 
then. But don't lose it; I'll be 
back for it after the assembly. 

Stranger (reading): "The plan 
would req"ire all students to at- 
tend Bates from 'very early' 
September until late June . . . 
for a total of three years. . . . 
Advantages would be: an 'im- 
portant year' would be saved for 
students going into graduate 
work, and employment would be 
possible ["He should have said 
necessary," thought the strang- 
er] a year earlier for those 
planning to go directly into 
careers." 

(To himself) Of course there 
is no mention of the many who 
are not anxious to hasten by a 
full year the time when they 
will be harnessed to a daily rou- 
tine, (continues reading) "The 
long summer vacation is a relic 
of the days when manpower was 
needed on the farms from June 
to September." (to himself) 
Could Big Prexy really have be- 
lieved that people would believe 
that such a system would be a 
blessing? Hmm. the word 
"blesser" in French means "to 
wound;" ironic, sort of. 

When people forget how to 
think, they believe, Ed be- 
to think, they believe, Ed be- 
lieves. He called the plan a suc- 
cess, but I prefer to call it 
Bates' Great Leap Backward or 
the Plan of Infamy. 

Jon D. Olsen '64 



7^ 
six 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



800 AM 



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— Tom Wyatt 



— BATES - COLBY STAX — 



Bales 



Colby 





FG 


FT 


T 




FG 


FT 


T 


Beaudry 


1 


3-3 


5 


Stone 


8 


6-7 


22 


Cummings 


8 


6-8 


22 


Oberg 


1 


0 


2 


Krzynowek 


6 


2-2 


14 


Federman 


11 


3-5 


25 


Hine 


1 


1-3 


3 


Stevens 


4 


2-4 


10 


Beiswinger 


3 


3-4 


9 


Swartz 


0 


2-5 


2 


Gardiner 


1 


1-1 


3 


McNabb 


0 


0 


0 


Johannesen 


1 


0 


2 


Astor 


0 


0 


0 


Johnson 


4 


0 


8 


Gibbons 


1 


0 


2 


Mischler 


0 


0 


0 


Dyhrberg 


2 


0 


4 


Stevens 


3 


0 


6 


Eck 


1 


0 


2 




28 


16-21 


72 




28 


13-21 


69 



The perfect Christmas present 
for parents, aunts and uncles 
a paramount book for all Bates graduates 




by Gladys Hasty Carroll 

Author of As the Earth Turns and Only Fifty Years Ago 

In this new book which reviewers call "warm, lovely and wonderful," the famous 
author of whom Bates is so proud tells the story of her own first years at the Col- 
lege in 1922 and 1923. 

"To Remember Forever is a record of youth and aspiration; In achieving, in those 
bright college days, more than the author had hoped for; of the warmth of family 
and friends, and a way of life that is radically different from today's yet carries its 
own common denominator: It is a warm and lovely book which is at once a period 
piece and a fine articulate human document." 

— Alice Dixon Bond, Boston Herald 

"All over America during those years, there must have been thousands of others 
going through very similar experiences. Perhaps they will enjoy savoring again 
the feel of happy, wholesome, eager youth. Such reminders of the unselfish love 
and purity which make family life precious and memorable are a challenge to par- 
ents and young people today. We can learn from them. We, too, can 'remember 
forever'." 

— Erwin Canham, Editor, The Christian Science Monitor 
At the college bookstore, $4.75, LITTLE, BROWN, Boston 



W. A. A. News 



By MOLLY ANDERSON '67 

Lately, beneath the dining 
area from the depths of Rand, 
shrieks have pierced the air as 
loyal Chasites, Wilsonians, etc., 
have cheered their respective 
volleyball teams on to victory. 
What the girls lack in skill, they 
more than make up in spirit, 
flexing arms, and legs. 

The first games were played 
on November 26th. Cheney out- 
numbered, out-cheered, and out- 
played a valiant Frye team. The ' 
Cheney girls specialized in low, 
fast serves and passes for which 
they are so well known. Also on 
that day, Milliken defeated Page 
A, which concludes the first, 
second, and third floors. That 
only goes to prove that quantity 
does not necessarily insure qual- 
ity. 

On November 29th, Chase, 
having declined the help offered 
by such notable players as Aunt- 
ie Flo, Herb Hackley, and Mrs. 
Mc, joined forces with Wilson to 
overwhelm Mitchell in two 
straight games, 15-9 and 10-3. On 
that same day, Page A with such 
outstanding players as Judy 
Johnson and Kowie Harther, was 
upset by the Cheneyites (un- 
aided by Bill Hiss, who had 
hopefully signed the Cheney 
sign-up sheet) in a three game 
match. Page A won the first 
game, 9-5, and Cheney, regaining 
spirit and coordination, came 
back to win the next two games, 
10-5 and 15-8. 

There are games scheduled 
for every Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Friday until 
the end of the semester, when 
Cheney (how could it lose with 
me on the team) should again 
reign victorious on the Bates 



Volleyball Scene. Rand, with 
their notorious Gretchen Zieg- 
ler, Linda Jewett, and other so- 
physically fit seniors, seem to be 
headed toward second place. Of 
course, the winning girls' dorms 
are open to challenges from any 
boys' dorms who feel adequately 
prepared to dispute their titles. 



Cheerleader 

If you think this little left-end 

cheerleader is always smiling, 

you're not too far from being 

wrong. In fact, she's one of the 

cheeriest girls on campus, as 

anyone who knows her can con- 
firm. 

The name — Judy Gray; the 
class — '66; the home — Brain- 
tree, Massachusetts; the major — 
English. 




THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 



Having cheered on her junior 
high squad, Judy took a breath- 
er in high school to allow time 
for other activities — some 
academic (National and French 
Honor Societies), some social 
(planning and attending all class 
functions), some athletic (she 
was captain of the girls' tennis 
team). Her love for singing con- 
tinued from Braintree to the 
Bates Choral Society, until she 
again felt the urge to cheer. Now 
a permanent member of our 
squad, Judy possesses valuable 
spirit and a sense of cooperation. 

Although the football season 
has ended, we can still look for- 
ward to seeing Judy and her 
fellow-cheerleaders on the bas- 
ketball courts. 



JEWELER 



73 Lisbon St. 



Lewislon 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE ai 

ADVANCE AUTO SALES, INC. 

24 FRANKLIN STREET AUBURN, MAINE 

Dial 784-5775 or 782-2686 

VALIANT-PLYMOUTH CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL 
5 -Year and 50.000 Mile Guarantee 

— GUARANTEED USED CARS — 
Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates-Affiliated People 



S 



* * 



i 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



SEVEN 



Inter-Class Meet Prepares 
Tracksters For Tufts Dual 



Coach Walt Slovenski's thin- 
clads completed a three day un- 
official inter-class meet last 
Monday as the final step in prep- 
aration for Saturday's official 
opener here with Tufts. 
2 O'clock Start 

The Garnet and the Jumbos 
commence competition at two 
o'clock with the running of the 
broad jump and hurdle trials. A 
good crowd would be in order to 
cheer the 'Cats on. 

Coach Slovenski feels that it 
is too early in the season to 
make any pre-campaign predic- 
tions. Both teams have their rel- 
ative weaknesses, but many ob- 
servers feel that those of Tufts 
outweigh those of Bates. 

Try for Repeat 

Last year Bates opened the 
season with a 72-41 victory over 
the Medford Jumbos. Tufts was 
strong in the weights, as they 
are this year. But Bates dominat- 
ed the running end. 

Last weekend saw evidence of 
what Bates' trackmen have in 
store for the Medford track 
team. 

Capt. John Ford nosed out 
Gerrit Benniwig in the 600 yard 
run. Pete Sweeney came in third. 

Finn Wilhelmson highlighted 



You, like many of us, may be 
reaching out in an effort to iden- 
tify yourself properly, — to learn 
who you are and where you are 
going. We believe we have found 
the answers to these questions in 
the Christian Science textbook, 
Science and Health with Key to 
the Scriptures by Mary Baker 
Eddy. You can find them, too. 

We invite you to come to our 
meetings and to hear how we 
are working out our problems 
through applying the truths of 
Christian Science. • 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
ORGANIZATION 

BATES COLLEGE 



Meeting time: 7:30 p.m. Sundays 
Meeting place: 93 College Street 

Science and Health is available at all 
Christian Science Reading Rooms and at man\ 
college bookstores. Paperback Edition $1.95. 



the meet by topping the record 
in the two mile run. Finn's time 
of 9 minutes 45 seconds passed 
the record by 21 seconds. 
Karl McKusick took second 
place, and he also surpassed the 
old record with a run of 9 min- 
utes 52 seconds. 
Double Win 

Junior Al Harvie displayed his 
fine style by taking two firsts in 
the hurdles and placing second 
in the broad jump with a leap 
of 21 ft. 5 in. He also took the 
45 yard dash in 5.1 seconds time. 

A freshman, Chris Mossburg, 
vaulted 12 ft. to take first prize 
in that event. Bob Kramer and 
Tom Hiller both went over at 
11 ft. 6 in. Tom Bowditch and 
Dave Johnson eclipsed six feet 
in the high jump. 

The results of this pre-season 
meet show that Bates has a for- 
midable squad in the track 
events. However, the weakness 
in the weights could pose a 
problem. Coach Slovenski felt 
however that competition was 
exceptionally keen at such an 
early date. 



2Ctng a Kattm 



By DON KING '64 . 

First of all I'd like to make a 
public apology for the obviously 
inferior manner in which this 
column was maintained during 
my sabbatical. The difficulties 
involved in finding a competent 
replacement were overwhelming, 
as I'm sure the results revealed. 

King Answers Back 

What is really important 

though, is that the boys did put 
forth an honest effort in an at- 
tempt to crack a few smiles, 
thereby staying within the boun- 
daries of the intended purpose 
of this column. 

A note of tragedy has been 
struck, however. I understand 
there is a vicious letter to the ed- 
itor in today's paper expressing 
someone's animosity towards last 
week's column. I have not yet 
read this letter, but understand 
there are thunderous overtones 
involved. Ordinarily I would not 
take exception to single out any- 
thing as demamatory and heart- 
less as this, but there are im- 
plications involved which are not 
visible on the facade. 





J.B. Championship Football Team (Hartwell Photo) 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
Dial 784-8165 Nights 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
Lowest Prices in Town 

TURCOTTE'S 
GARAGE 

Lewiston's Only Radio Dispatch 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabattus St. Lewiston 



SAM'S 
Esso Servicenter 

534 Main St. Lewiston, Me. 

To All Bates Students and 
Faculty — 10% and Green 
Stamps On All Accessories 
Tires and Tubes 

Front End Alignment/ 
Wheel Balancing, Tuneup, 

Free Pickup and Delivery 

Service 



D eW I T T 
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HOTEL 

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"wlno to 
INDIVIDUAL AND 
GROUP PARTIES 
Sunday and Holiday Dinners 
A Gormet's Delight 



Louis P. Nolin 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



VICTOR NEWS COMPANY 

50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
IN THE STATE 
Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

— SCHOOL SUPPLIES — 

Book Dept. open 8:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 

First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
~ 



Truth Revealed 

Unfortunately, the poor boy 
who was responsible for last 
week's article happens to be in- 
fected with a chronic brain 
syndrome, causing him to have 
obsessive compulsive reactions. 
(Oh, you poor wrestlers without 
psychology.) Needless to say, 
criticism of any sort only 
worsens this poor lad's condition. 
This is why everyone connected 
with this column is so uncon- 
cerned and upset over the 
b latant, malicious criticism 
which has been directed upon 
us! I truly cannot say if we will 
be able to withstand another at- 
tack as poignant as this. 

All I can do at this moment is 
express my sincere sorrow to the 
person who wrote this epistle 
over his void in a sense of hu- 
mor (and also lack in character 
for forgetting to sign his name). 

Before Closing 

I have one more apology to 
make, and this is directed to the 
boys in John Bertram Hall. It 
has been brought to my atten- 
tion (by the boys from J.B.) that 
not enough mention and acclaim 
was given to them for winning 
the intramural football cham- 
pionship. Obviously time or 
space would not allow adequate 
recognition and it would appear 
seemingly impossible to give 
credit to specific individuals in 
such a unified endeavor. There- 
fore, I direct those of you inter- 
ested to the directory where all 
the boys from J.B. are listed. 




SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, Dec. 4 

JV Basketball at G o r h a m 
State 

Friday, Dec. 6 

Basketball at St. Anselm's 

Saturday, Dec. 7 
Basketball at Northeastern 
Track here with Tufts 
JV Track here with Tufts 

Monday, Dec. 9 
* Basketball at Bowdoin 

Wednesday, Dec. 11 
♦Basketball here with Maine 
♦State Series competition 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 

Opp. the Mart 



Provencher Hill 
FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS 

Tel. 784-5563 



Bobcat Of The Week 

Selected this week for Bob- 
cat honors is Junior Seth Cum- 
mings. Seth also won the award 
last year for outstanding ability 
displayed on the basketball 
court. He was named to the All- 
Maine team by both the M.I.A.A 
and the STUDENT. 

Monday at Waterville, Seth 
and his group of "mosquitoes" 
combined with the rest of the 
team in a successful effort to 
subdue the Mules. Seth account- 
ed for eight field goals and six 
free shots for a total of twenty- 
two points. 

The Shrewsbury, Mass., native 
was applauded highly for his 
phenomenal ball handling and 
playmaking. His defense was 
also outstanding. 

In the closing minutes of the 
Colby game Seth accounted for 
six of Bates' twelve points. His 
great agility with the ball frus- 
trated Colby defenders into foul- 
ing him. 

The economics major was a 
starting guard on his high 
school team which won the Cen- 
tral Massachusetts High School 
championship. As a senior he 
was honored by being named the 
student-athlete of his class. 

We of the STUDENT sports 
staff add to Seth's honors by 
singling him out as the Garnet 
sporting scene's athlete of the 
week. 



PATRONIZE 
OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



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TAXI 

784-5469 



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Roger and Regina LaBrecque 
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— FLOWERS WIRED WORLD WIDE — 



EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 4, 1963 



Cats Drop Favored Mules, 72-69 

Cummings Leads Bates With 22; 
Speed, Teamwork Big Difference 

By DON DELMORE '64 
A fired-up Bobcat squad shocked a highly -favored Colby quintet 72-69 Monday at Wa- 
terville to open the '63-'64 season in fine fashion. The well-drilled 'Cats threw a zone press 
at the Mules that proved to be too much for the home team to handle. The result of the 
hard -fought game was proof that it is stiill possible for a small, well-coached, and 
hustling unit to win in this era 




By NICK BASBANES 

It has often been reported that in the game of basketball, 
as well as all other team sports, that team work is perhaps 
the most important element essential for success. And this 
observation proved no less than true this past Monday at Wa- 
terville. For it was there that our small, spunky, and swift 
cagers humbled the potent Mules to the tune of 72-69. The 
smooth mixture of desire and mutual dependence coupled to- 
gether to excite the thrilling throng of loyal Bobcat rooters 
This was a most gratifying victory for the Garnet, as virtual- 
ly everyone had predicted a cinch win for the boys on May- 
flower Hill. 

The reports were spread far and wide that the 'Cats stood 
but a dog's chance in the opening encounter of the new sea- 
son. Even the local paper, The Sun-Journal, ran a series of 
three articles and as many pictures of the Waterville team, 
proclaiming them as the foremost claimants to the state 
crown. Hardly a word or a photo was put forth in the inter- 
est of the home town team. But the underdogs proved su- 
preme in a most convincing contest. 

Colby had the height, the experience, and the public; Bates 
had the desire, the speed, and the class. Operating from a 
unique offense consisting of three guards and two forwards, 
the Bates five opened the game with an initiative that seemed 
too good to be true. The sharpshooting and playmaking of 
the mosquitoes, Seth Cummings, Ted Krzynowek, and Don 
Beaudry, faked the up-state giants right out of the gymna- 
sium. The biggest lead that Colby could muster was a five- 
point spread, and that was early in the first half. With but 
fifty seconds remaining in the half, the 'Cats converted a one- 
point deficit into a three point lead. 

The second half saw Bales prove that the first half wasn't 
a Cinderella story. They never relinquished their lead, and 
at one point the difference between the two was as much as 
eight points. The big threat of the game came in the contest's 
final minute with Bates leading by one point. Colby man- 
aged to get the ball on a traveling call and called time out. 
The feeling in the stands was that this hard-earned battle 
might be lost in vain to the Mules. But the losers failed to 
connect and the 'Cats turned up with the ball after a scram- 
ble beneath the net. Bill Beiswanger was fouled and he iced 
the game with a two point conversion with only six seconds 
remaining on the clock. The team predicted by the local au- 
thorities to lose by twenty points surprised everyone (you 
didn't see any predictions coming from here) by staking a 
foothold in the early race for the state laurels. 

Most convincing was the smooth play of last year's All- 
Mainer, Seth Cummings, and the other relatively short men 
in the Garnet lineup, Ted Krzynowek, Don Beaudry, and Bob 
Johnson. Averaging about 5-8 in height, their aggressiveness 
and alertness more than compensated for their lack in height. 
All-New Englander Ken Stone scored 22 points, while Ken 
Federman topped the losers with 24. The only other notable 
scorer for Colby was John Stevens with 10. The rest of the 
Colby team contributed but eight points to their cause. A 
glance at the Bobcat scoring will give an indication of how 
much a combined team effort was involved. The scoring, 
instead of being monopolized by a few sharpshooters, is 
spread out pretty evenly. 

The second squad which was called on twice to lend a 
hand, did a most notable job. When they went in the first 
time Bates and Colby were tied; when they left Colby had 
only a one point lead. 

This week-end will see the 'Cats face some very tough 
competition. Friday the boys journey to Manchester, N. H., 
to meet the highly-touted St. Anselm's squad, followed Sat- 
urday by a contest in Boston with Northeastern. 

Congratulations to the good sized group that journeyed to 
the game. The Colby boys I'm sure were appreciative of our 
presence. . . . Watch out, sports fans, Tony's back for 
another year. 



of emphasis on the big man. 

Mules Take Early Lead 

Colby opened the scoring on 
a fifteen foot jump shot by All- 
Stater Ken Stone as first half ac- 
tion began. All-State guard Seth 
Cummings knotted the score at 
2-2 with a six footer from the 
baseline. The 'Cats set up in a 
three quarter court zone press 
that dropped back into a loose 



a close. A jump shot by "Fea- 
ther"' Krzynowek, followed by 

two Beaudry foul conversions, 
pushed Bates into a 22-22 tie 
with 7:29 remaining. At this 
point Coach Peck went to his 
bench to give his tired starters 
a deserving rest. A second unit 
of guards, Bob Johnson and Bob 
Wischler, center "Ingo" Johnan- 
nesen. and forwards Fred Ste- 



the great shooting and driving 
of forward Ken Federmen. With 
8:55 remaining, Coach Peck sent 
in his second unit which once 
again successfully protected a 
five point lead for three minutes. 

As the Mules started to show 
Bates a full court pressing man- 
to-man defense, Cummings went 
to work and put on a show any- 
one at the game will never for- 




Front, 1. to r.: Don Beaudry, Bob Johnson, Dave Heckman, Ted Beal, Capt. Will Gardiner. Seth Cum- 
mings, Bob Micheler, Ted Krzynowek. Standing. Manager Leigh Campbell, Bill Beiswanger, Fred 
Stevens, Joe Malzkin, Mike Hine, Carl Johanesen. John Wyman, Russ Reiley, Coach Peck. 



2-1-2 zone under the defensive 
boards, in the event that Colby 
succeeded in bringing the ball 
upcourt. However, the Colby 
guards proved incapable of pen- 
etrating the press as time and 
again the 'Cats turned a steal 
into a score off a fast break. 

Bobcat guards Don Beaudry, 
Ted Krzynowek, and Cummings 
double teamed the Mules, forc- 
ing them to continually throw 
the ball away. Sophomores Mike 
Hine and Bill Beisswanger bol- 
stered the 'Cat attack up front 
with strong rebounding and 
tight defense. 

Lead Changes Hands 

The lead changed hands sever- 
al times as the first half drew to 



vens and Captain Will Gardiner 
matched baskets with the Mules 
for the next six minutes. Three 
quick hoops by Johnson and two 
by Stevens sparked the reserves 
to their fine showing. 

The starters returned to ac- 
tion with 1:31 remaining — 
Cummings gave the 'Cats a 39- 
38 lead on a jumper and a lay- 
up resulting from a clear out. 
Krzynowek made the score 41-38 
at halftime on a steal seconds be- 
fore the buzzer. "Feather" 
wrapped in two long jumpers to 
give the Bobcats a 45-38 lead, 
the widest margin of the entire 
game, as second half action be- 
gan. Colby continued to peck 
away at the lead, largely due to 



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get. The 'Cats cleared out one 
side and time and again Seth 
successfully drove for the bas- 
ket. The Mules knew they'd have 
to stop him but found that this is 
quite impossible in a one on one 
situation. Seth dropped in six of 
the last twelve Bobcat points 
from the foul line as the defense 
continued to helplessly foul him. 

Game Iced 

A 70-69 Bates lead was iced 
with : 14 remaining, as "Ingo" 
came down with a key rebound. 
Bill Beisswanger was fouled 
during the final freeze and 
dropped in two from the line to 
make it 72-69 with only :06 left. 
Cummings, the lean one with all 
the moves, led all Bobcat scorers 
with twenty-two points, followed 
by the little flash Krzynowek 
with fourteen. Federman and 
Stone paced Colby with twenty- 
five and twenty-two respective- 
ly. Although outrebounded un- 
officially 52-35, the 'Cats were 
not to be denied. A truly great 
team effort proved to be the dif- 
ference. If you can possibly find 
a ride to St. Anselm's this Fri- 
day, the advice from one who 
saw this exciting new Bobcat 
team in action is to take it quick. 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

Phones In Rooms 
- Free TV - 

Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 

Auburn. Maine 

Dial 783-2044 



Hates 




Student 



0 



Vol. XC, No. 12 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, DECEMBER 11, 1963 



By Subscription 



Television And 
Drama - Serve 
To Create 

Dr. Samuel B. Gould '30, 
President of the Educational 
Broadcasting System of New 
York City, gave a brief talk on 
the motivations of life last Fri- 
day. Dr. Gould was the chapel 
speaker in the Bates Centennial 
Academic Conference on Drama 
and Television. 

Security, service to others, 
and creative satisfaction are the 
three major motivations of life, 
stated Dr. Gould in his speech. 
He said that "today's youth is 
much more security minded" 
and that they look only for the 
ease in life, not the challenge. 

Service Via Security 

Service to others is stimulated 
by youth's eagerness to be asso- 
ciated with his superiors and se- 
curity. Much of youth's unhappi- 
ness stems from a lack of crea- 
tivity and the satisfaction that is 
gained from a job well done. A 
lack of creativity makes a per- 
son a "monotonous and unre- 
sponsive treadmill". Dr. Gould 
described creative satisfaction 
with the words, "It is the cap- 
stone to the humanistic side of 
life." 

Teaching and educational tel- 
evision, Dr. Gould said, are the 
two best ways of attaining crea- 
tive satisfaction and are ways 
of expressing creativity and pro- 
vide a flavor of achievement. He 
concluded by saying, "Many if 
not all careers have in them this 
selfsame flavor . . . the spark is 
there, it remains for each of us 
to find it." 

Olher Panelisis 

The other members of the con- 
ference panel are: Mr. Robert L. 
Hobbs '50, assistant professor of 
Dramatics at Northwestern Uni- 
versity; Dr. Eugene S. Foster '39, 
Director of Television at Brook- 
lyn College; Mrs. Regina Abbia- 
ti Lucas '59, secondary school 
speech teacher. 

Sixth and last in the series of 
Discipline Conferences is the one 
to be held on December 13 on 
Government. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Dec. 11 
J.V. game at 6:30 
Chapel Committee Meeting, 

Libbey #8, 4:30 p.m. 
Math Help Class, Libbey #1 

and 8, 7-9 p.m. 
Vespers, Chapel, 9:30 p.m. 

Friday. Dec. 13 

Rob Players Christmas Play, 

"Why the Chimes Rang," 

Little Theater, 8:00 
Government Career Panel, 

Women's Union, 3:00 p.m. 

Saturday, Dec. 14 
RECESS 



INDEX 



If We Are To Lead 
Tagliabue On Kennedy 
Bates Tops Bowdoin 



Page 4 
" 3 
" 6 




Principals in "Why the Chimes Rang" 

Rob Players Will Present 
"Why The Chimes Rang" 



The Robinson Players will pre- 
sent Why the Chimes Rang this 
Friday at 8 p. m. in the Little 
Theater. The play tells the story 
of a poor boy and his Christmas 
gift to the Christ child. Lead 
roles will be played by Tod 
Lloyd, Suzanne Johnson, and 
the two young children of Hob- 
by Shoppe Mike. In addition to 
the speaking parts there will be 
a pageant in pantomime of the 
presentation of Christmas offer- 
ings which closes the play. 

The play will be directed by 
Abby Palmer assisted by Kar- 
en Heglund and Roberta Mes- 
cavage. Lighting effects and 



Christmas music will be used to 
carry out the theme of the pres- 
entation. 

Following Why the Chimes 
Rang there will be a reception 
in the theater's Green Room in 
observation of two anniversaries. 
Twenty-five years ago to the 
day Miss Schaeffer presented her 
first Bates production. Also this 
marks the twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary of the founding of the Rob- 
inson Players as we know the 
group today. 

"The Ideal Chrisimas Gifl" 

Rob Players season tickets are 
still on sale evenings at the box 
office. 



Thumm Predicts Little Change 
With Johnsons Administration 

Dr. Thumm analyzed the Johnson Administration for the 
Gould Political Affairs Club, last Tuesday evening. He ex- 
pressed confidence in Johnson's ability > to take over the 

Presidential office. *- — ; — rr— 

fered two reasons for this polit- 
ical success: 1) as a moderate, 



The main problem is the pres- 
ervation of stability and the 
maintenance of public confidence. 
To this effect, Dr. Thumm pre- 
dicted little change in personnel. 
President Johnson will probably 
retain most of the ambassadors, 
department heads, and Cabinet 
members appointed by Kennedy. 

Another area in which stabil- 
ity must be maintained is that 
of policy. Dr. Thumm recalled 
few differences over policy be- 
tween Johnson and Kennedy. He 
predicted that the White House 
will continue to support civil 
rights, space exploration, the tax 
cut, and federal aid to education. 

Dr. Thumm foresaw the great- 
est change coming in the areas 
of personality and style. He re- 
ferred to Kennedy as the 
"renaissance man" and to John- 
son as "more provincial". Also, 
Kennedy preferred to deal di- 
rectly with as many people as 
possible. Dr. Thumm suspected 
that Johnson will employ his for- 
mer Senate strategy of depend- 
ing on staff aides and "devoting 
the full force of his personality 
to a few key figures". 

Elected to the Senate in 1948, 
Lyndon Johnson rose to the key 
position of majority floor leader 
after only six years. Thumm of- 



Johnson "got along well with 
most or all of his party"; 2) he 
was not too identified with any 
geographical block. 

In 1960, Senator Johnson ac- 
cepted the Democratic nomina- 
tion fOr the Vice-Presidency. Be- 
fore the Truman Administration, 
the Vice-Presidents had been 
little more than political figures 
with no significant position in 
the government. 

Eisenhower and Kennedy fur- 
thered Truman's policy of con- 
sulting with the Vice-President 
and keeping him well-informed 
on Administration affairs. How- 
ever, the transfer of power still 
confronts Johnson with several 
problems. 

Dr. Thumm felt that John- 
son's chances for election in '64 
are good. He stated as his first 
reason, "Because he's a Demo- 
crat.". Secondly, the success of 
the Republican's most likely can- 
didate, Barry Goldwater, de- 
pends upon victory in the South. 
A recent Harris poll shows John- 
son running ahead of Goldwater, 
Nixon, and Rockefeller in the 
country as a whole, with his wid- 
est lead appearing in Southern 
states. 



Novice Team Third 
At Boston Tourney 

A novice Bates Debating team compiled a four won and 
two lost record last weekend, at the Greater Boston Novice 
Tourney. Representing Bates were Seppo Lehto '67, and 
James Filakosky '67 on the af-* 
firmative, and Robert Cornell 



'67 and Walter Pearson '67, who 
debated the negative side of the 
topic. 

On the resolution "The Fed- 
eral Government should guar- 
antee an opportunity for higher 
education for all qualified high 
school graduates," the affirma- 
tive team defeated Holy Cross 
and University of Connecticut, 
and lost to Boston University. 

The negative defeated Stone- 
hill and Emerson, while losing 
to Boston University. Holy Cross 

Biological Art 
Will Win Fudge 

What promises to be "the high- 
point of the cultural season", 
according to Dr. Robert M. 
Chute, will be on display 
throughout this week on the 
first floor of Carnegie. The ex- 
hibition of "Biology art and il- 
lustration" will be judged this 
afternoon at approximately 4:00 
p. m. 

"Large pieces of fudge, suit- 
able for framing," and baked by 
Dr. Chute, will comprise the 
awards. Dr. Chute, who teaches 
Biology and is chairman of var- 
ious departments, urges all stu- 
dents who can possibly do so "to 
take in the exhibit'". He was 
careful to note, however, that 
"we don't know how many we 
can accommodate". 

Professor Tagliabue, who had 
a preview of the exhibit, was 
moved to comment, "You mis- 
spelled exhibit." 



and Boston University, with five 
wins and one loss, were the 
leading teams at the tourney. 
Bates with a four and two rec- 
ord was next in the competition 
that included nine schools. 

On a point basis, the Bates 
negative received an award as 
the best negative team at the 
tourney. „ 

Next weekend, the Eastern 
Debate Tourney will be held at 
St. Peter's College in Jersey 
City, N. J. 

Robert Ahem '64, Tom Hall 
'64, John Strassburger '64 and 
Susan Stanley '64 wll represent 
Bates. Bates is the defending 
champion and the first three 
were members of last year's 
championship team. 



The following resolution 
was passed unanimously by 
the Bates College faculty at a 
special faculty meeting on 
December 6, 1963. 

Whereas: the student body 
and Student Senate of Bates 
College contributed greatly to 
the success of the recent Cen- 
tennial Convocation and Col- 
loquia by their wholehearted 
cooperation above and beyond 
the call of duty, be it re- 
solved 

1) That the Faculty ex- 
presses its appreciation to the 
Student Senate, the student 
body, and particularly to the 
senior class, for their contri- 
butions; 

2) That appropriate public- 
ity be given to this resolution. 




Biological Art and Fudge Maker with Friend 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 11, 1963 



Republicans Screen 
/ Operation Abolition 

The Young Republicans Club recently presented the House 
Un-American Activities Committee film "Operation Aboli- 
tion". A congressman appearing in the film describes it as a 
challenge to the patriotic youths* 
of our nation and every citizen 
determined that we shall protect 
our freedoms." Other observers 
have called the film a classic 
study in the use of propaganda. 



JUNIOR-SENIOR 
PRIZE SPEAKING 

The Junior - Senior Prize 
Speaking contest will be 
held in January. Interested 
students should prepare an 
eight to ten minute persua- 
sive speech suitable for a 
college assembly. 

Tryouts will be held on 
Monday, January 6 at 4:00 
p. m. in Room 300. Petiigrew. 
Four speakers will be chosen 
to compete in the Finals 
which will be heard in suc- 
cessive Chapel programs 
during January. 

Speeches should stress 
"creative thought". Awards 
of twenty-five and fifteen 
dollars will be awarded to 
ihe best speakers. 



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The film dealt with the San 
Francisco student demonstrations 
against the HUAC. The narra- 
tor's main theme was that the 
affair was the work of known 
Communists or of Communist 
sympathizers. He implied that 
those who opposed the committee 
were either Communists or 
"dupes" of the party. 

The most notable aspect of the 
film was an apparent discrepancy 
between the sound track and the 
actions recorded by the camera- 
men. Some scenes displayed pic- 
kets marching quietly, with no 
visible signs of agitation. The 
sound track carried the shouts 1 
of an angry mob at this point. 
When the narrator described the 
demonstrators as throwing shoes 
at police, there were no shoes to 
be seen other than on people's 
feet. 

Discussion following the film 
was concentrated on the appar- 
ent slanting of the views and 
evidence presented. Student re- 

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Office Supply Co., Inc. 
Office Furniture & Supplies 
249 Main St., Lewiston, Maine 
782-0141 



Guidance 

SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Senior men who might be in- 
terested in a career with a pub- 
lic utility company are encour- 
aged to consult literature from 
the BROOKLYN (N. Y.) UNION 
GAS COMPANY (available in 
the Placement Office. If enough 
students express an interest in 
the company, a recruiter will 
visit the campus. 

The New York State Depart- 
ment of Social Welfare is seek- 
ing men and women who want 
to become professionally quali- 
fied child welfare workers. Ap- 
plication for scholarships in the 
trainee plan or intern plan 
should be made prior to April 1. 
SUMMER WORK 
EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS 

The Guidance Office has in- 
formation about summer work 
programs in the area of social 
work. New York, N. Y., Boston, 
Mass., Providence, R. I., Augus- 
ta, Maine, and Cleveland, Ohio 
are some of the locales. 

Social agencies in all areas of 
Massachusetts are arranging for 
small groups of students to spend 
Monday, December 30th with 
one or more members of their 
social work staff. Students inter- 
ested in this social work career 
program should make an appli- 
cation immediately. 

action in general seemed to be 
opposed to the methods and con- 
tent of the highly controversial 
presentation. 



Art Historian Analyzes 
Great Paintings On E-TV 




By JANET McEACHERN '66 
For prospective museum roam- 
ers and art conniseurs, WCBB is 
presenting a new program "Sir 
Kenneth Clark on Art" Friday 
nights at 8:00 p.m. 

In the course of eleven illus- 
trated television talks, Sir Ken- 
neth Clark will anayze paintings, 
also giving background material 
about the men behind the 
brushes. 

Out of Burning 

This week's program is entitled 
"Out of Burning", showing the 
destruction of Coventry Cathed- 
ral in World War II and its res- 
toration. The following five pro- 
grams will concern "Land- 
scape into Art", illustrating the 



SKIING 
Jim Farnsworth's newest 
and eighth annual movie, 
MOSTLY SKIING, which in- 
cludes scenes from Califor- 
nia to Switzerland, with an 
abundance of breathtaking 
and enticing sequences taken 
in his 100,000 miles of travel, 
will be shown in the Little 
Theatre, Friday. January 3, 
at 8:30 p. m. 



PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sal., Sun. 

\BYE BYE BIRDIE 

Janet Leigh 
Dick Van Dyke 
Ann-Margaret 
Maureen Stapleton 
Bobby Rydell 
Jesse Pearson 
Ed Sullivan 

"THIRTEEN 
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An All-Color Show 

Continuous Fri. from 5 p.m. 

Sat. from 1 p.m. 
Sun. from 3 p. m. 



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| Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.— 

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SUN.— Get acquainted dance. 
(Wear Bermudas!) MOIV.- 
College Day at the beach. Tal- 
bot Brothers Calypso, College 
Queen Contest, barbecue lunch. 
TUES.— Jazz session, Limbo 
contest, buffet lunch, WED. 
— Cruise to St. George, Steel 
Band entertainment, Gombey 
dancers, refreshments. 
THUnS.-On your own: 
swim, shop, sightsee, sports. 
FRI. -College Week Revue - 
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development of landscape paint- 
ing and the artists whose varied 
aesthetic attitudes have given 
direction to this development. 

Having spent several years in 
television work in England, Sir 
Kenneth is well aware of the 
problems of presenting art on the 
black and white screen. He has 
selected paintings whose inter- 
est does not depend on color or 
subtle shading. When showing 
the paintings, he avoids static 
demonstration by keeping the 
camera moving over the surface 
of each picture as he talks about 
it. 

Sir Kenneth Clark has been 
called "one of the greatest art 
critics of our century", and has 
held the posts of Keeper of the 
Department of Fine Arts at the 
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 
England; Director of London's 
National Gallery; and Surveyor 
of the King's Pictures, and 
Chairman of the Arts Council. 
In 1938 he was knighted; in 1959 
he received the Companion of 
Honor. He has also received the 
French Legion of Honor and the 
Lion of Finland — all honors in- 
dicative of his major contribu- 
tions to the better understand- 
ing of art history. 



here is a book 

that is , 
helping tis 



think 
clearly 




In these troublesome times it 
takes some doing to keep one's 
perspective — to appraise world 
conditions with intelligence — 
and to come up with satisfying 
answers. This book, Science and 
Health with Key to the Scrip- 
tures by Mary Baker Eddy, has 
helped many of us to do this. It 
can help you, too. 

We invite you to come to our 
meetings and to hear how we 
are working out our problems 
through applying the truths of 
Christian Science. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
ORGANIZATION 

BATES COLLEGE 

Lewiston 

Meeting time: 7:30 p.m. Sundays 
Meeting place: 93 College Street 

Science and Health is available at all 
Christian Science Reading Rooms and at many 
college bookstores. Paperback Edition $1.95. 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 11, 1963 



THREE 



In The Wind 



By 

BRADFORD F. ANDERSON '66 

IN THE WIND 
Warner Bros. Records 
W#1507 

There is probably no other 
folk group that has achieved 
such an immediate and well de- 
served reception by the public 
as Peter Paul & Mary. The pop- 
ularity generated across the 
country represents neither age 
nor position because the music 
they sing belongs to the people. 
It comes from them, is created 
by them, and cannot live without 
them. 

Technical Correctness 

The terrific success of the first 
two albums created a real de- 
mand for more of the same. To 
abate this hunger Warner Bros, 
has released IN THE WIND, a 
record that probably ranks high 
in musical perfection (as com- 
pared to the other two albums), 
but lacks the special ingredient 
that distinguished them from 
other "folk groups." 

Musical director Milton Okun 
can pride himself on the good 
tonal quality that pervades 
throughout. There is also evi- 
dence of increased competence 



in assembling the components of 
technical correctness that pro- 
duces good, but not necessarily 
great, music. 

In a poem on the album jac- 
ket, Bobby Dylan remembers 
their early times together in a 
subterranean coffee house called 
the Gaslight. He recalls that 
theirs was a "concrete beginning 
because it's close — an' it's , close 
because it's gotta be close — an' 
that feelin' ain't to be forgotten." 
He thought that when they 
sang, "it was a rock hittin' a 
brick wall," but now the feel- 
ing of a lemon tossed into a 
bowl of Purina lurks in the gen- 
eral impression. 

I know this is being pretty 
hard on the group, but I believe 
they have let us down. "Long 
Chain On' and "Tell It On The 
Mountain" approach their for- 
mer greatness. However the al- 
bum as a whole cannot compare 
to their past successes. Perhaps 
they have become too profession- 
al; I suspect this is part of the 
answer. Spirit and sincerity used 
to be their byword. They repre- 
sented in music the spirit of the 
new century and for this loss I 
call them to order. 




The lonely republic . . 

the 



• • • 



. the sense of his being gone 
flag at half-mast. 




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Notes From A November - December Journal, 1963 

By JOHN TAGLIABUE 
Cortege / November 25 

The seven white horses 

and the riderless black horse 

casting shadows on the streets of Washington; 

the eight horses and the Gallant Rider substantially in the Sun. 

* * * 



November - December 1963 

1. 

That's not a program you can 
turn off, is it? the dead march; 
the death march, the beating of 
the drums, the crossing of the 
bridge to the cemetery, the fold- 
ing of the flag, the lighting of the 
fire; the long cortege of slow 
moving cars; in a box ? slowly 
the dark box moves you see it 
all in a different way now; the 
sense of his being gone ... all 
the funerals; the various mur- 
ders, elevators, ambulances, 
newspaper men, repeat the mur- 
der in the cellar in slow motion; 
the children, the old strange hu- 
morous priest, the wife in black. 



Do you 

see all the broken hands and the 
pavements? 



2. 

X marks the spot of the 
many murders 

Where are we now? what hap- 
pened to the watches, the clock? 
what happened to the map, the 
plans of city streets? where's 
my shadow? I see cars in the 



street; are those people inside? 
suddenly many people feel old 
and the old futility described in 
the "modern" books seems un- 
interesting and prevalent; many 
newspapers have headlines about 
a variety of assassinations; don't 
you see some lawmakers won- 
dering, hesitating about civil 
rights?; there's a busy routine 
don't forget and Sears Roebuck 
is heated and lit up for 
Christmas or Xmas Sales. 

Nov. 28. 

Not to act in some way now 
peacefully and constructively for 
peace, for civil rights for all 
American citizens, for more and 
better education, amounts to 
acting against democracy. Not 
to have in many peaceful ways 
religious demonstrations against 
hatred and violence and preju- 
dice is to blaspheme the Amer- 
ican Dream and in practical 
ways to destroy the lovely re- 
public. 

Blake: "Are not religion and 
politics the same thing? Brother- 
hood is religion." 

Nov. 27. 

My daughter's 16th birthday. I'm 
Cortege / 1963 



glad she was able to hail him. 

The clarity and ardor, the dem- 
ocratic enthusiasm — along with 
practicality, patience, humor, 
great intelligence and a most 
lively active sense of honor — 
these were all embodied in him; 
yes, as Stevenson reminded us, 
the young President made us 
feel proud to be Americans; and 
this with self-confidence, but 
not pride; he seemed always to 
show that there was something 
greater than you or me or him 
that inspired us, that led us to 
becoming poets. (Whitman: "The 
United States themselves are 
essentially the greatest poem. 
. . . Here is the hospitality which 
forever indicates heroes. . . . 
For I say at the core of democ- 
racy, finally, is the religious ele- 
ment All the religions, old and 
new, are there.") His religious 
heart was something we natur- 
ally took for granted, though it 
awakened us; the present of his 
spirit now as with all our power 
and in our different countless 
ways we must re-create that 
spirit makes kind heroes of us 
all, world citizens to begin 
with . . . 



The shadow of the horseless rider in the sun; 

the casket drawn slowly; over the face of the dead Hero 

the stars; in the memory of the lovers the stars. 



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News, Weather 
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News, Weather 
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News, Weather 
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6:45 


Bill Young 
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Norm Bowie 
Show 


Ron Green 
Show 


Record Room 
Dick Dow 


Pete Heyel 
Weekend Eve 


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Masterworks 


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News, Weather 
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News, Weather 
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News, Weather 
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News, Weather 
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Insight 
Steve Adams 


Folk 
Hour 


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John David 


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John David 


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8: 00 Pianoforte — Bruce Cooper 



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Correction: The lead on Jon Olsen's letter, in last 
week's STUDENT, should have been Bates 1984. 




720 

Sabattu St 
Daily 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 11, 1963 



Editorials 



| If We Are To Lead 

Last Friday the faculty passed a "resolution" patting the 
studentry on the back. 

If this resolution, printed on page one of today's STU- 
DENT, represents the extent and depth of the faculty's 
"spirit of inquiry," we are surely without hope. 

We realize — and we emphasize our understanding — that 
there are members of the faculty who see clearly the prob- 
lems facing this College and our educational system as a 
whole. It must be even more discouraging for them than it 
is for us, to be in the stultifying situation we are now in. 

Communication, as Dean Boyce has recently pointed out, 
is a two-way process. This we cannot agree with more 
wholeheartedly. Unfortunately, after an unparalleled attempt 
at communication and cooperation on the part of the student- 
ry, the faculty has not responded. The Student Senate, in a 
mass meeting before the Colloquium, called for moderation 
in the student protest against compulsion. 

To be moderate means to temper one point of view with 
another. Moderation thus implies, and in fact requires, co- 
operation. Without cooperation, moderation becomes an im- 
possible mode of action. Student leaders, counting on facul- 
ty support, asked for moderate action. Perhaps they, as well 
as this newspaper, were mistaken. What we call for now is 
a demonstration that we were, in fact, not wrong. 

At the Dedicatory Convocation, William S. Paley spoke 
these words: We need to stop nibbling at the edges of the 
problem, getting bogged down in unrelated and side issues, 
and cut clear to the heart of the matter. He went on to point 
out the kind of revolutionary attitude and action, the kind 
of "vision and daring spirits," the situation seems to need. 

How greatly we need to discover the truth of this! Some 
aspects of "the problem" have been set forth in this column 
and elsewhere. The Rev. John C. Agnew said last month in 
a chapel address that if we are to lead, what we say and 
what we do must become more important in our own minds 
than what we sell or what we use. 

In other words, what we actually do in education must be- 
come more important than the image we try to cast. If 
Bates is not to "rest on its laurels," or look to the past to 
see something pleasant, we must be unafraid to adopt the 
"revolutionary attitude and action . . . the situation seems 
to need." 

What is most baffling to us is the strange reaction of 
many that somehow students should have no voice in deter- 
mining the life of the College — that we must either "like it 
or lump it;" and that any attempt to voice our thoughts is 
tantamount to attempting complete takeover of the College. 
Nothing could be. more absurd. 

President Phillips, in his introduction to the Colloquium 
schedule — entitled "To Stimulate Productive Thinking" — 
described the Colloquium participants as "more than casual 
visitors to the campus; they are dedicated to the present wel- 
fare and future progress of the College." 

If only the full meaning and import of this statement 
could be grasped! The students, too, participated in the 
Colloquium! They, too, are "more than casual visitors to the 
campus"! They, too, "are dedicated to the present wel- 
fare and future progress of the College"! Any student who 
is not so dedicated is not worthy of being called "student;" 
and any faculty member who is not does not deserve to be 
called "teacher." 

The problem we face is not merely one of which rules to 
obey — these are the "edges" at which we all too frequently 
only "nibble.!' Rather, what we must be involved in is a 
probing and searching for the ingredients of an education — 
that, in fact, is. education. And "if we are to lead" in this 
process, it will take more than resolutions of appreciation; 
it will take a resolution of revolution! 

P. d'E. 



Letters To The Editor 



Hates 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Zimmerman '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Alan Hartwell '66 1 Photographer 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Herb Mosher '65, R. 
Avery '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, Judy Marden 
66, Gran Bowie '66, Phyllis Schindel '66, Linda Mitchell '66, Sue 
Lord '66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 

Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel. 
783-C001. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 90 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewiston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913, 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



Breach of Policy 

To the Editor: 

Whether or not the lead to 
Steve Barron's column (in the 
Nov. 4 issue of the STUDENT) 
was correct is unimportant. The 
pertinent fact, however, regard- 
ing this lead is that it was al- 
lowed to be criticized by an un- 
signed letter. This is undoubted- 
ly a serious breach of editorial 
policy, and it is of my opinion 
that a written apology is in or- 
der. 

Don King's article partly ex- 
presses the popular feelings on 
the subject, but the matter must 
not be dropped. Should we now 
be led to believe that all un- 
signed and personally defama- 
tory letters will be printed? 
Does the editor use "The Truth" 
to serve his own purposes? 

Robert Bekoff '65 

Yes, since the truth is our pur- 
pose. Ed. 



One Man's Meat 
To the Editor: 

It was with considerable inter- 
est, and even some admiration, 
that I read in the November 13 
STUDENT of the faculty deci- 
sion to require student attend- 
ance at the centennial convoca- 
tion, and of the student reaction 
to this decision. And it was also 
with some interest that I read 
Malcolm Mills' letter in the No- 
vember 20 STUDENT, which I 
take to have been provoked at 
least partially by the faculty de- 
cision. 

Malcolm Mills represents a 
philosophy which has always 
been very common among col- 
lege students. The most vocifer- 
ous adherents of this philosophy 
are, indeed, often the most in- 
telligent. It is unfortunate that 
they are also usually the most 
immature and rebellious. 

Malcolm obviously does not yet 
understand the function of the 
undergraduate liberal arts col- 
lege. 

Malcolm expresses concern that 
the education (however slight 
it may have been) he received 
during his short stay at Bates, 
and hence that any person re- 
ceives, was not stimulating. The 
necessary and sufficient reply to 
this is "hogwash". I suggest that 
Malcolm is unlikely to find stim- 
ulation at any college, for this 
is characteristic of his type. 

What Malcolm seeks is not in- 
tellectual liberty; it is intellect- 
ual license. Since this is not per- 
mitted by any responsible educa- 
tional institution, he will seek 
in vain. Malcolm and those like 
him must realize that it is only 
in disciplining oneself to seek 
truly valuable experiences that 
one reaches intellectual maturi- 
ty though these may sometimes 
seem less exciting. 

This is, in fact, generally true 

— that success in life is achieved 
only by self-discipline. This ap- 
plies to intellectual matters as 
well as to any other. An undis- 
ciplined mind is like an undis- 
ciplined child, and neither is 
very beautiful. 

It is only after graduation that 
one begins to appreciate his un- 
dergraduate experience. Here at 
this vast university I see many, 
many products of what might be 
called "un-liberal" arts colleges 

— graduate students whose only 
field of intellectual interest and 
conversation is their field of 
specialization. Vanishingly few 



graduate students in chemistry 
here can discuss even the most 
general aspects of say, the phil- 
osophy of Hume, or the novels' 
of Tolstoy, or the symphonies of 
Haydn. 

I am very grateful that at 
Bates I was disciplined to be 
aware of these things, and in- 
fected with a real and lasting 
appreciation for many of them. 
So let us not be too quick to side 
wtih those who condemn Bates 
for offering "a narrow minded, 
conservative, and failing educa- 
tional experience." Rather let us 
applaud it for, instead, offering 
the valuable mental discipline 
which produces intellectually 
mature individuals. 

Brian Moores '63 



C. A. And Senate 
Support Exchange 

By CLIFFORD GOODALL '65 

A group of Bates students have 
organized a Student Exchange 
Committee. The function of this 
committee is to organize a one- 
week, reciprocal exchange in 
the spring with a southern, Ne- 
gro college. 

The exchange is an attempt to 
overcome the physical handicap 
of distance, which makes it dif- 
ficult for a true, mutual under- 
standing and involvement in the 
problems of each area. 

The exchange will consist of a 
small group of students and pos- 
sibly a faculty member from 
each school. These visitors will 
literally invade the host campus 
in the dormitories, classrooms, 
dining halls, panels, and other 
school and community activities. 



MODULATIONS 

By LAUREL BOOTH '66 

A true Christmas celebration 
seems incomplete without the 
presentation of Handel's The 
Messiah. On Friday evening 
from 8-9:30 The Masterworks 
Hour will broadcast The Inde- 
pendence Choir, Church of Lat- 
ter-Day Saints' arrangement of 
The Messiah. Since the choir 
trains specifically for only two 
annual appearances, this Christ- 
mas program should prove to be 
a masterful performance. 

Students interested in obtain- 
ing their third-class broadcasting 
licenses are reminded that F.C.C. 
booklets remain on reserve in 
the library. 

The entire staff of WRJR wish- 
to extend season's greetings to 
the Bates community. 

The itinerary for the guests of 
Bates will be strutured for the 
maximum informal exposure of 
the visitors. 

The exchange program has 
received both financial and of- 
ficial support from the Christian 
Association and the Student 
Senate. 

Dr. George Goldat is the ad- 
visor to the Student Exchange 
Committee, whose members are 
Cliff Goodall '65 (chairman); 
Sally Smith '64 and Scott Nor- 
ris '64 (C. A. representatives); 
Margery Zimmerman '64 (Stu- 
Senate representative) ; Norm 
Bowie '64; Peter d'Errico '65; 
David Williams '65; and Kelley 
House '66. This committee will 
eventually be enlarged. Anyone 
who wishes to participate in 
some aspect of the program 
should contact one of the above 
members. 



Shape Of Things To Come 



By 

BRADFORD F. ANDERSEN '66 

Now that some of the shock 
has worn off the events of three 
weeks ago, much of the nation 
is temporarily concerned about 
just what they can expect be- 
tween now and election time. 

Compared to President Kenne- 
dy, the activity of President 
Johnson will seem a "slow, mad- 
dening pace." Temperament as 
well as personality determines 
this; experience and custom for- 
malizes it. 

The years Lyndon Johnson in- 
vested as Senate leader makes 
the transfer from legislative 
thinking to executive-level de- 
cisions difficult. President Ken- 
nedy found this out when he 
tried to deal with Congress as a 
fellow legislator rather than as 
an executive. 

Johnson carries to the office a 
political acumen of in-politics 
that, coupled with sentimental 
public pressure on Congress and 
an awakened responsibility by 
all concerned, might just carry 
many of the Kennedy programs 
to realization. At least opposi- 
tion will be less vocal for quite 
a while. 

Organization at the White 
House during the 1960-1963 
period has been both unique and 
energetic. Surrounded by an 
untraditional group of highly 
intelligent men, President Ken- 
nedy may not have accomplished 
any more than the Eisenhower 
years; yet he did succeed in cre- 
ating an atmosphere that emu- 



lates the spirit of the new cen- 
tury. 

Under President Johnson these 
intimates will gradually leave 
government service because of 
incompatibility, disillusionment, 
or new policies, (Needless to 
say, the original reason for their 
being there is gone.). 

Johnson has not evidenced any 
great affinity for this group of 
intellectuals and will most like- 
ly proceed with a more prag- 
matic philosophy. 

In spite of Johnson's recent 
statement of "profound confi- 
dence" in Secretary of State 
Dean Rusk, we can expect reor- 
ganization in the State Depart- 
ment. It is likely that Secretary 
Rusk will remain until the next 
election too, and for the same 
reasons, but it is possible that 
change may occur before then. 

Under President Kennedy, for- 
eign policy was directed from 
the executive level. He and his 
advisors provided the impetus 
for any action taken — not the 
professional diplomats. There 
will be a definite change in this 
department now as Rusk is 
backed up or replaced by depart- 
ment planners. Some readjust- 
ment will be necessary if Presi- 
dent Johnson concentrates on 
domestic affairs, since he is not 
oriented in the foreign field. 

These are the major areas that 
will encounter transformation. I 
have outlined some possibilities; 
whether or not they will become 
results is beyond knowledge; 
however, be assured that change 
is underway. 



BATES STUDENT, 



ER 11, 1963 



FIVE 



Student Puck Enthusiasts 
Play Weekly At C.M.Y.C. 



By JOHN BART '64 
They get old shirts from the 
athletic department. Their goalie 
pads are lent to them by Lewis- 
ton High School. The rest of 
the equipment they need, and 



dorm basis with Parker and 
John Bertram Halls taking on 
Roger Williams and Smith. 
Parker and J.B. lead the series, 
two games to one. 
Also, if anyone is interested in 




Hockey Club in Action at Arena (Hartwell photo) 



Kittens Open Season In 
67-63 Win OverG.S.T.C. 



the ice they skate on and the 
time they use to do it is their 
own, or is paid for by them. 

"They" are twenty-two Bates 
students who play sixty straight 
minutes of hockey on New 
England's biggest indoor ice 
surface, the Central Maine Youth 
Center. For this privilege once a 
week they pay $20. 

This group has been playing 
for three weeks now on Tuesday 
night between 10 and 11 p.m. 
They plan to play once a week 
from now until the end of Feb- 
ruary except for finals, and 
perhaps may play several times 
in March. 

The original organization was 
started last year by John Lund, 
Russ Wagenfeld and Paul Ber- 
tocci. Working from the begin- 
ning of this year, they have 
managed to generate some more 
interest among those students 
who played hockey in high 
school and those who just like 
the game enough to be willing to 
spend their time and money to 
keep up contact with it. 

The group is completely in- 
formal. Its only connection with 
Bates is that everyone in it hap- 
pens to be a student enrolled 
here. 

The group also wishes to be 
dynamic. Hence, its membership 
is not closed. Anyone wishing to 
play either every week or just 
occasionally should see one of 
those mentioned above. The cost 
of playing is about $1 a week. 
If enough new members are 
found, a new team wil] be 
formed. 

As of now, play is going on a 



refereeing any of these games, 
they should make themselves 
known to one of the players. 



By STEVE RITTER '65 

Chick Leahey's Junior Varsity 

basketball team got off on the 

right foot last week in a 67-63 

win over their Gorham State 
Teachers College counterparts. 
The game, played at Gorham, 
was an exciting win for the Bob- 
kittens. They were able to 
come from behind after a ragged 
first half performance. It is 
gratifying to see a team come 
from behind to win, and consid- 
ering that the game was played 
on the away court, the win is 
more significant. 

The Kittens, playing a press- 
ing game similar to the one 
executed by the varsity squad, 
had a rough first half. Trailing 
by a score of 30-24 at half-time, 
the Kittens came onto the floor 
for the second half with hot 
hands. Bill Garfield, who had hit 
for 5 points in the first half, 
sparked the comeback. The 
smooth, playmaking guard ex- 
hibited an uncanny ability to 
get the big hoop. He ripped the 
cords for 17 points in the final 
half to wind up with 22 points 



for the evening. Gerry Ireland, 
working at the other guard 
spot, contributed all of his 10 
points to the second half surge. 
Strong rebounding by both Ire- 
land and Tom McKithich was 
responsible for a great deal of 
their second half success. 

The scoring for the entire 
game was well-balanced. Gar- 
field with 22 points deadlocked 
Gorham's Ridlon for high point 
honors. Ireland and McKithech 
followed with 10 apiece, while 
the other starters, Jim Brown 
and Ken Lynch each added 9 to 
the cause. Coach Leahey feels 
that this starting unit has the 
ability to develop into a fine ball 
club. Look for rangy Lou Flynn 
and rugged Bill Brunot to pro- 
vide that always-needed bench 
strength. The J.V.'s have a tough 
schedule ahead of them. Gone 
are the former soft touches, ap- 
pearing in the form of ragged 
service teams. We can look for 
Coach Leahey's quintet to pro- 
vide the fans with some excit- 
ing preliminary action in the 
Alumni Gym. 





LOU'S PLACE 

Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . , Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Marl 



By DON KING '64 
It appears that the J.B. intra- 
mural dynasty will continue — 
at least through volleyball sea- 
son. Even without the talents of 
their 6' 6" star spiker, Ian Prav- 
da, the A team virtually rolledj 
over the Off Campus "J.C.C. 
Wonders". The Playboys, now 
known as "Zeus' Folly", never 
had a chanceas J.B. was far su- 
perior in both games. 
Big Bobby's Bomb 

Mention should be made of 
Bobby Thompson's performance 
for the victors, as his sharp 
spikes continually caught the 
losers flatfooted. When Big 
Bobby brought that right hand 
around you knew it was good 
for another point. Poor Gary Lia 
was hit with one of Thompson's 
flaming spikes in the second 
game and we didn't know 
whether to call Gary's girl or 
not. 

The only bright spot for the 
Playboys was that Peter Pequi- 
not never got to touch the ball. 
Peter did his job perfectly as he 
remained completely oblivious to 
his surroundings. 



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783-2269 
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My personal theory as to why 
the Playboys can't seem to util- 
ize their tremendous potential is 
that a tacit religious conflict has 
manifested itself, Silverstein 
won't hit the ball to Agnos, Ag- 
nos refuses to hit it to Pequinot, 
and Pequinot can't hit it anyhow. 

Off Campus also met J.B. in B 
league action which saw O.C. 
lose another two games. 

A few "select" intramural bas- 
ketball players put on a splen- 
did show Saturday, upsetting the 
J.V.'s by 14 points. Bobby Lanz 
really went to work as he dem- 
onstrated why Smith Middle 
will be a serious threat in A 
league activity. "Sugar" Wallach 
never looked sweeter as he 
popped in his jump shot at will. 
"Spider" Silverstein showed the 
boys a few moves so they 
couldn't even find the Manches- 
ter flash to foul him. 
Man of the Week 

Intramural Man of the Week 
honors go undisputed to Thomas 
(you know you can't beat me) 
Carr. Tom has become the "Cas- 
sius Clay" of the pool room as 
he continually backs up his pre- 
dictions with victories. 



WAA News 

By MARCIA FLYNN '65 

Having also taken a vacation 
from my column last week, I am 
very pleased to report that cer- 
tain comments were not hurled 
at my crew. 

Big Game 

The highlight of this week's 
volleyball activities was the an- 
nual WAA Board vs. the female 
faculty members. Leading the 
squad was that high-heeled 
"spiker," Dean Randall. Other 
members on her team were Miss 
Abbott, Miss Foster, Doctor 
Dillon, Miss Nell, and Mrs. Hin- 
mann. Unfortunately, this illus- 
trious combo fell to the some- 
what more youthful (?) agility 
of the WAA Board members! 

In the intramural scene this 
week, we find some fast action. 

On December 4, Rand emerged 
victorious over Mitchell, win- 
ning 15-0, 11-13, and 14-6. The 
old ladies of the Convent have 
shown much prowess on the 
court since the season started, 
and certainly appear to be a 
troublesome contender. 

These Are My People 

On the same day, Cheney 



Cheerleader 

When she's not busy being our 
bright-eyed Batesy cheerleader 
from Philadelphia, Karen Hastie 
is a very serious student major- 
ing in government here at 
Bates, with the intention of 
someday studying law. 

A quiet girl, Karen makes up 

in volubility while cheering 
which she lacks in volume in her 
everyday activities. But don't 
think she isn't friendly! That 




(Talbot photo) 



flashing wicked smile is con- 
vincing evidence of her lively 
interest in people. 

Editor of the yearbook while 
attending Girls High School at 
home, her other accomplishments 
include excellent fried chicken. 
A sophomore, Karen is auditing 
French to prepare for spending 
her Junior year in Switzerland, 
but whether or not her plans for 
this future are realized, we hope 
to have Karen here to brighten 
the Bates campus for a long 
time to come. 

challenged Hacker House and 
I'm happy to report that "my" 
team "creamed" those supposted- 
ly aspiring athletes from Hack- 
er. 

On December 6, Chase-Wilson 
easily subdued those lovely lit- 
tle maidens from Milliken 
House, 14-3 and 10-6. Conclud- 
ing the games for the week, the 
Page A team beat once again 
that unlucky team from Frye 
House. 

Thanks are in order to the 
timer and scorer for these 
games, Laura Hoyt, and to Ref 
Donna Whitney. 



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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



SIX 



BATES STUDENT, DECEMBER 11, 1963 



Garnet Drops Polar Bears, 73-71 

Drop Games To Hawks, Huskies; 
Meet Maine Team Here Tonight 




By NICK BASBANES 

Vacation time draws near and the sports-minded individ- 
ual ponders the various activities which present themselves 
during such a recess. One day to keep in mind is New 
Year's Day, and the event to remember is the Cotton Bowl. 
This famous contest pits the number one ranked team in the 
nation, Texas, against the number two ranked team, Navy. 
The prediction (I'm at it again) from this end will favor the 
Longhorns. To my way of thinking, the Middies were lucky 
enough to come out of Philadelphia with a win, as Lady 
Luck makes no habit of smiling twice in a row. 

I will also agree with Army Coach Paul Dietzel in picking 
Cadet Rollie Stickweh as the best quarterback on the field. 
He did a fantastic job in leading his team to the very brink 
of a great upset. His great running, his superb ball handling, 
his wide knowledge of plays led Army on its two scoring 
drives without even throwing a single pass. A few variables in 
the final seconds (like an astute official or quiet crowd) could 
have meant victory. The game was well played, however, 
and both teams should be pleased. 

You can also hope to see the Bears meet the Giants in the 
N.F.L. championship playoff. I realize that the Browns failed 
me in my forecast of a few weeks ago. However, humility 
(as well as facts) force me to laud the New York team as the 
best in the East. Hiding behind the screen of a vacation, I 
will pick the Bears to win the gridiron's climactic contest. 

While on the subject of the Giants, perhaps many of you 
noted that Joe Don Looney, the ex-Oklahoma football great 
(he was dismissed from Bob Wilkinson's Sooner squad in 
mid-season for fighting with a coach) has signed to play in 
Y. A. Title's backfield. He was the Giants' top draft choice, 
and his presence should strengthen the relatively weak- 
running backfield of New York. 

Congratulations are in order for Jim Taylor, the multi- 
talented halfback at Lewiston High for making the state's 
All-Maine team. The senior athlete is the son of Mrs. Tay- 
lor, the pleasant lady who works in the administration of- 
fice. Jim was a top competitor on this year's championship 
squad, and his duties in the backfield and on defense made 
him a most essential member of the unit. 



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The fired up Bobcats took pos-* 
session of first place in the state ' 
series race Monday night by 
dropping defending champs 
Bowdoin 73-71. 

The Bates squad utilized a 
tight press in the first half and 
opened a lead of eleven points. 
Bowdoin tried futilely to close 
the gap in the second. However, 
the closest they could come was 
a mere one point. 

Bates effectively handled the 
boards in the first half; and the 
consistent harassing of Bowdoin 
by the fast Bobcat guards caused 
many Polar Bear errors. Bow- 
doin made good on only 11 of 44 
shots in the first half as opposed 
to the 15 of 35 for the Bobcats. 

The Brunswick team did better 
in the second half by outscoring 
Bates with 21 of 42 shots from 
the floor, to 11 of 28 for the 'Cats. 

The vital factor in the game 
was Bates' proficiency at the 
foul line. The 'Cats hit 21 for 38, 
while Bowdoin could only man- 
age 7 out of 14 of the free 
throws. Most impressive in this 
department was sophomore Bob 
Johnson, who filled in for the 
fouled out Ted Krzynowek. In 
the closing minute of the cru- 
cial contest, Johnson went to the 
line and made good six free 
throws in a row. 

High scorer for Bates was 
again Seth Cummings with 21. 
Mike Hine, Bill Beisswanger, 
Don Beaudry, and Ted Krzyno- 
wek put in top performances for 
the 'Cats. High for Bowdoin was 
Dick Whitemore with 27. 



Bates (73) 

Beisswanger 
Cummings 
Stevens 
Gardiner 
Hine, c 
Johannesen 
Beaudry, g 
Krzynowek 
Mischler 
Johnson 
Totals 
Bowdoin (71) 
Napolitano 
Pease 

Whitemore, c 
Silverman, g 
Ingram 
Schwadron 
Totals 



G F P 

6 2 14 

6 9 21 

0 0 0 

2 0 4 

6 0 12 

0 0 0 

0 2 2 

4 2 10 
0 0 0 
2 6 10 

26 21 73 

G F P 

5 2 12 
2 2 6 

12 3 27 

6 0 12 
0 0 0 

7 0 14 
32 7 71 



Halftime score: Bates 37, Bow- 
doin 26. 
Officials: Gentile, Crozier. 
Time: 2 20's. 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



On Route 100 & 202, Just Out- 
side Auburn, Half Mile from 
Turnpike Exit No. 12 . . Phone 
783-1488 . . . Room Phone 

STARDUST MOTEL 

Exclusive But Not Expensive 



Terminal 
Barber Shop 

"INVITES ALL 
BATES STUDENTS" 

218 Main St. Lewiston 

Next to Bus Terminal 



The 'Cats took to the road this 
past weekend and suffered a let- 
down after their upset victory 
over Colby. They were first 
edged 79-71 by St. Anselm's on 
Friday and then downed 82-62 
by Northeastern on Saturday. 

The game started with both 
teams trading baskets. A Don 
Beaudry drive matched the first 
of twelve hoops by St. Anselm's 
forward Tony Greer. 

Same Defense 

The 'Cats again set up in the 
same zone press that was so suc- 
cessful at Colby, but the talent- 
ed Hawk guards had little trou- 
ble bringing the ball upcourt. 
Both teams made use of a run- 
ning offense, putting the fast 
break to great use at every pos- 
sible opportunity. St. Anselm's 
played tight man-to-man de- 
fense while the 'Cats dropped 
back into their familiar zone de- 
fense. 

Second Team Shines 

Coach Peck once again used 
the 'Cats' strong second unit to 
rest his starters. They en- 
tered the game with 9:15 of first 
half play remaining and held 
their own with the Hawk first 
unit for the next five minutes. 
The rested starters returned to 
action and promptly opened up 
a four point lead. A tap-in by 
Cummings and a steal by Krzy- 
nowek gave the Bobcats a 33-24 
lead, the widest margin of the 
entire first half. The Hawks 
fought back behind the great 
driving of Greer and managed 
to tie the score at 39-39 as the 
buzzer sounded. 

It seemed that the bubble had 
burst as the second half began. 
The Hawks opened a 53-44 lead 
during the first eight minutes 
and appeared to be well on the 
way to a rout. But the hustling 
'Cats bravely fought back and 
finally took the lead. Beaudry 
then gave the 'Cats a three point 
lead with another jumper from 
ten feet. 

However, at this point, jump- 
ing jack Myles Dorch went to 
work and dropped .in seven 
straight points and pushed the 
Hawks to victory. 

Bates 71 

Beisswanger 0 0-1 8 

Cummings 11 3-4 25 

Hine 4 0-2 8 

Beaudry 6 1-1 13 

Krzynowek 4 1-5 9 

Stevens 1 1-1 3 

Gardiner 0 0 0 

Johannesen 1 1-4 3 

Johnson 10 2 

Mischler 0 0 0 

32 7-18 71 

St. Anselm's 79 

Greer 12 5-6 29 

Dorch 3 1-3 7 

Guzzardo 0 0 0 

Golden . 7 1-1 15 

Carey 7 1-1 15 

Pascal 0 0 0 

Slade 3 2-2 8 

McCarthy 1 0 2 

34 11-16 79 

_ _ 

"HOTEL HOLLY- 
BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 
Main Street Lewiston 

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Huskies Romp 

The great depth and height of 
the Northeastern Huskies proved 
to be the deciding factors in the 
game played Saturday in Boston. 
The 'Cats traded baskets with 
the home squad and even led 
12-11 during the early minutes 
of the first half. 

But the Huskies ran off eleven 
straight points to begin the rout. 
Northeastern, paced by their tall 
starting unit of Fred and Fran 
Ryan, John Malvey, Tom Mar- 
tin, and Norm Hoffman, made 
the 'Cats take very long shots to 
keep these "trees" from block- 
ing them. Northeastern led 50- 
26 at the half, and substituted 
'freely throughout the remainder 
of the game. 

Bates 62 

Beiswanger 2 4-4 8 

Cummings 6 3-4 15 

Hine 2 3-4 7 

Beaudry 4 0 8 

Krzynowek 3 2-4 8 

Stevens 3 0-1 6 

Gardiner 0 1-1 1 

Johennesen 1 2-5 4 

Johnson 2 0 4 

Mischler 0 1-1 1 

Wyman 0 0 0 

Matzkin 0 0 0 



23 16-24 62 



Northeastern 82 

Malvey 

Martin 

Ryan, Fran 

Hoffman 

Ryan, Fred 

Bowman 

Knight 

Farrar 

Keating 

Kelley 

Phillips 

Coyman 

Kemp 

Dulan 

Brenner 



6 

3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
4 
2 
0 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
0 



0-2 

2-3 
4-4 
2-3 
4-6 
0 

2-2 
2-2 

0 

0 

0-3 

0 

0 

0 
2-2 



12 

8 

10 
6 

10 
6 

10 

6 
0 
4 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



32 18-27 82 



BEDARD'S 

MAINE'S ONLY 
DRIVE-IN PHARMACY 
Phone 4-7521 Lewiston. Maine 
Cor. College and Sabattus Sts. 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. at Bates St. 
Tel. 783-2011 



I 



'hates 




Stu dtnt 



$7 



Vol. XC, No. 13 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, JANUARY 15, 1964 



By Subscription 



Senior Men Select Seven 
For Winter Carnival Court 




Of these seven, one will be Queen 



W. A. A. Discontinues Betty Bates 
In Response To Female Apathy; 
Varied Events To Replace Week 

Betty Bates is gone, possibly forever! At a recent meeting, the W. A. A. board voted 
to discontinue the traditional Betty Bates Week, which had featured the selection of a 
junior woman as Betty Bates after a week of tea, fashion, and athletic prowess. 



The men of the senior class 
have elected seven Bates women 
to the Winter Carnival Court. 
One of the girls will reign over 
Carnival as queen. The magnifi- 
cent seven are Roz Avery, Carol 
Johnson, Ingrid Kaiser, Carol 
Kinney, Martha Linholm, Joan- 
na Starr, and Gail Hayden. 

English major Roz Avery 
hails from Walton, New York. 
She abandoned Bates last year 
to spend her Junior year study- 
ing in Scotland. 

Carol Johnson, English major 
and world traveller spent her 
Junior year abroad, studying in 
England. She is most often to be 
found in the Little Theater 
where she is currently involved 
with directing class projects and 
Right You Are, If You Think 
You Are. Carol comes from 
Manchester, Conn. 

Ingrid Kaiser is a German ma- 
jor from Jamaica, N. Y. Her 
extra-curricular activities in- 
clude skiing and almost any- 
thing connected with the W.A.A. 
Last year Ingrid served as a 



proctor and was a Betty Bates 
candidate. 

Carol Kinney is currently rep- 
resenting the women's side of 
campus in the new Student 
Senate. Also active in the 
W.A.A. , Carol is the reigning 
Betty Bates. Last year found 
this Biology major a proctor, 
trying to hold down the fort at 
Mitchell House. In the off sea- 
son she lives in Belmont, Mass. 

Multi-lingual Joanna Starr is 
a French major from Manches- 
ter, N. H. She is an active mem- 
ber of the French and Spanish 
clubs and of Phi Sigma Iota, an 
honorary society for language 
students. 

Gail Tupper Hayden, of Islip, 
New York is an English major. 
Last year she was a proctor in 
Wilson and representative on 
the Student Government. 

Martha Lindholm, representing 
the local talent, is an English 
major. Her activities include 
Rob Players and service as cir- 
culation manager of the 1963 
Mirror. 



Library Fines Due January 17; 
Thesis Material On Display 



The Library reminds students 
that all library fines are due be- 
fore the 10 p. m. deadline on 
Friday, January 17. Any fine 
amounts remaining unpaid af- 
ter the deadline are subject to 
an additional charge of two dol- 
lars. 

All students owing library 
fines were sent a final fines no- 
tice in their mail boxes on 
Monday of this week. NO FUR- 
THER NOTIFICATION EITHER 
BY MAIL OR BY TELEPHONE 
WILL BE MADE. 

Students are further remind- 
ed that college obligations must 
be fulfilled before taking final 
semester examinations. 

Lack of cooperation on the 
part of a number of students in 
the recent past has caused major 
library time and effort to be ex- 
pended on the clearing of fine 
accounts and has necessitated 
adoption of the above proce- 
dure. Clearing of accounts is a 



student responsibility. 

Are YOU making full use of 
the library? 

To seniors laying groundwork 
for a thesis or to the student 
preparing a term paper the ex- 
tensive resources of the library 
collections' can be an unexpect- 
ed revelation and genuine help. 
Often valuable material avail- 
able is untapped. 

A few basic indexes and man- 
uals are currently on display in 
the library lobby to alert stu- 
dents to the resources at hand. 

The extensive accumulation of 
United States Government Pub- 
lications available in the de- 
pository collection is not listed 
in the card catalog but may be 
explored with the aid of the 
Reference Librarian. 

Mr. Myers will be happy to 
suggest those aids most applica- 
ble to your topic and to explain 
their use. 



Fourteen Attend Maine 
GOP Finance Dinner 

Led by club president Brad 
Andersen '66, eleven Young Re- 
publicans and three guests of 
the club attended the Maine Re- 
publican Biennial Finance Din- 
ner in Augusta last Friday 
night. 

Featured speakers at the din- 
ner included Governor Reed, 
Representatives to Congress Mc- 
Intyre and Tupper of Maine and 
Gerald Ford of Michigan, 
ored with silver cups for their 
work during 1963 were the 
county finance chairmen of 
Maine who succeeded in raising 
$79,000 for the Maine Republi- 
can Party. 

The approximately 1,500 per- 
sons who attended the dinner 
were part of the workers who 
raised money during the year. 

Before the dinner the Gover- 
nor and representatives were 
introduced to the college stu- 
dents and spoke briefly with 
each of them. Accompanying the 
members of the Bates Young 
Republican Club were Nancy 
Lester '64, President of the 
Gould Political Affairs Club, 
Robert Ahern '64, President of 
the Student Senate, and Nor- 
man Gillespie '64, Editor of the 
STUDENT. 



Community Dinner 
Celebrates Granting 
Of Bates' Charter 

The one-hundredth anniver- 
sary of the granting of the 
Bates Collegiate Charter will be 
honored at a joint community 
testimonial on January 18. 
Sponsored by the Chambers of 
Commerce of Lewiston and Au- 
burn, the testimonial will be 
held in the Montello Junior 
High School at 7 p. m. 

Included in the program is a 
dinner and brief comments 
made by representatives of lo- 
cal industry, civic and commer- 
cial groups. Dr. Charles F. 
Phillips will make a reply on 
the college's behalf. , 

The Reverend Daniel J. Fee- 
ney, Bishop of Portland, will 
give the Invocation. Reverend 
Frederick D. Hayes, trustee, 
from the High Street Congrega- 
tional Church will also officiate. 

Attending the testamonial 
dinner will be mayors of Lewis- 
ton and Auburn and other city 
dignitaries. Governor Reed will 
send a message of congratula- 
tions to the College. Expected 
also to attend are representa- 
tives of government from Wash- 
ington. 



This action was taken as the 
result of a questionnaire hand- 
ed out to the women on campus. 
This questionnaire was designed 
to find out whether the girls 
preferred to have Betty Bates 
Week remain as it has been in 
the past, or whether they would 
like to see some changes made. 

Of the more than 300 ques- 
tionnaires which were distribut- 
ed, only 122 were returned. This 
fact alone indicates a definite 
lack of interest in Betty Bates in 
any form. It must also be noted 
that the best percentage of re- 
plies came from freshmen who 
have never seen a Betty Bates 
Week. The upperclasswomen, on 
the other hand, were not as con- 
cerned about the program. 

For the most part, the replies 
to the questionnaires, both for 
and against the proposed 
changes were well expressed. 
The majority of these replies fa- 
vored the proposal to eliminate 
candidates for Betty Bates. 

Numerous suggestions were 
given for possible activities dur- 
ing the week. Due to the num- 
ber of these suggestions, the 
Board found itself with an im- 
possibly wide range of activities 
to sponsor. For this reason it was 
decided to do away with the 
idea of Betty Bates Week alto- 
gether. Instead, the Board be- 
lived it could present a wider 
range of activities by spreading 
them throughout the year, ra- 
ther than concentrating too 
many events in one week. 

The first event will be a skat- 
ing party, to be held on Febru- 
ary 6. The second plan is for a 
fashion show to be held on Feb- 
ruary 28. 

Members of all four classes 
will be asked to participate, and 
it is hoped that a speaker will 
be obtained who will address the 
women on some subject of in- 



terest to them particularly." In 
March the two films suggested 
in the questionnaire will be 
shown. Inter-dorm bowling com- 
petition will be held shortly af- 
ter spring vacation. 

Of course these activities do 
not begin to encompass all the 
suggestions made by the stu- 
dents. However, it must be re- 
membered that W.A.A. is pri- 
marily a recreational organiza- 
tion, and that activities such as 
painting classes etc. are handled 
by other groups. 

This year's program is an ex- 
periment. If the planned activi- 
ties are successful, the sugges- 
tions made will be passed on to 
the new board. If the program is 
not successful, new plans will 
have to be formulated. 

The new plans are intended 
to improve and expand the pro- 
gram of W.A.A, rather than de- 
crease it. Betty Bates seems to 
have lost a central and mean- 
ingful purpose. Originally, the 
Betty Bates program was known 
as Health Week. As such, it was 
a period of active training for 
the girls, and of close attention 
to personal grooming. Definite 
items were the basis of judging 
candidates: hair, posture, etc. 

The worth of recent programs, 
in light of these earlier aims, 
has been dubious. Betty Bates 
night has become a theater pro- 
duction, and the selection of 
Betty Bates has been made on 
the basis of personality instead 
of specific accomplishments. 

Some disagreement with the 
changes made is expected. How- 
ever, as has been previously 
stated, the plans are of an ex- 
perimental nature. The W.A.A. 
Board believes that they will be 
successful, and that the organi- 
zation's entire program will be 
improved and expanded as a re- 
sult of these decisions. 



Debaters Take Third At Easterns; 
Ahern Second In Extemp Contest 



The varsity debate team of 
Robert Ahern '64, Thomas Hall 
'64, John Strassburger '64, and 
Susan Stanley '64, went to Jer- 
sey City to participate in the 

Easterns Debate Tournament, on 
December 13 and 14. 

Hall and Ahern swept through 
the tourney undefeated while 
Strassburger and Stanley went 
3-2 for a total record of 8 wins 
and 2 losses and third place, 
with Dartmouth second and 
Marymount of New York in 
first. In individual events, Ahern 
placed second in extemporane- 
ous speaking. 

The negative team defeated 



Villanova, St. Johns, City Col- 
lege of New York, Harpur, and 
Queens College. The affirmative 
team defeated Holy Cross, Le- 
Moyne, and Albertus Magnus 
but lost to Georgetown and Se- 
ton Hall. All debates were on 
the proposition that the federal 
government should guarantee an 
opportunity for higher education 
to all qualified high school 
graduates. 

The varsity teams will have 
only one more tournament this 
semester. Jeffery Rouault '65 and 
Max Steinheimer '66 will attend 
the important Harvard tourney 
at Cambridge the last week in 
January. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



Government Scripts 



Student Senate 

The meeting began at 6:09 
p.m., Tuesday, January 7. 

Absentees: Aikman, Sadlier. 
Committee Reports 

Extra-Curricular: Fuller re- 
ported that this committee will 
meet on January 14, to discuss 
final Carnival Plans. 

Correspondence: Information 
concerning an intercollegiate 
bridge tournament to be held in 
the Spring was given to the 
Senators. Wilson moved that 
we allocate the necessary $5 de- 
posit to hold a place for Bates in 
the tournament. This motion 
was passed. 

New Business 

Beekman suggested that the 
voting regulations be changed 
so that a person vote not only 
according to sex but also accord- 
ing to class. After discussion 
Beekman moved that the Senate 
institute a referendum about 
changing the voting regulations 
according to his suggestion. 

After further discussion the 
Senate decided that the election 
procedures in general need to be 
investigated and Beekman's mo- 
tion was lost. A committee was 

Winter Carnival 
Program 

January 30 - Thursday 

Crowning of the Queen and 

presentation of the court, 

Hathorn steps 
Square Dance, Alumni gym, 

8:00 

Open House, Women's Union, 
following the dance 

January 31 -Friday 

All Day: Ski Trip, King Pine 
Ski Area in New Hampshire 

February 1 - Saturday 
Ski Movie, Little Theater, 3:15 
Banquet, Commons, 6:00 
Carnival Dance, Alumni Gym, 
8:00 

Open House, Women's Union 
following the dance 

February 2 -Sunday 
Entertainment: the Journey- 
men, Alumni Gym, 2:15 



Exempting Speech 

Freshmen who may wish 
lo attempt an exemption ex- 
amination for Speech 100 
are requested to check their 
qualifications with Professor 
Quimby, Pettigrew Hall, 
Ro<*n 309, before the end of 
the first semester. An ex- 
emption examination will be 
given before the start of the 
second semester so that any 
exempted may start their al- 
ternate course immediately. 



f- + 
"HOTEL HOLLY- 
BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 

Main Street Lewiston 

H + 



LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 

DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 

. Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



set up, consisting of Ziegler, 
Beekman, Southall, Steinheimer, 
and Winter, which will look 
into the mechanics of the vot- 
ing procedure and will report 
back to the Senate next week 
(January 14, 1964). 

The meeting adjourned at 7: 14 
p. m. 

Women's Council 

The Women's Council met in 
the Smoking Room of the Wo- 
men's Union at 6:35 p.m. on 
Thursday, January 9, 1964. 

Some delegates will be sent 
to the New England Women's 
Student Government Association 
Conference to be held at the 
University of Maine on May 1, 
2, 3. 

Proctors were asked to post 
the changes in hours (as per the 
Blue Book) for Carnival. Wo- 
men are reminded that before 
leaving for a vacation, they are 
to sign out as well as signing in 
upon return. 

The meeting adjourned at 
8: 15 p. m. 



WCBB Features 



Tonight 

5:30 WHAT'S NEW — "Soar- 
ing." Film clips and 
graphs demonstrate the 
art of motorless flight. 

7:00 ONCE UPON A JAPAN- 
ESE TIME — "Momo Taro 
or Peach Boy." The legend 
of a boy who was found 
inside a peach by an el- 
derly Japanese couple. 

7:30 REPERTOIRE WORKSHOP 

— "Shakespeare's Hero- 
ines." The psychological 
aspects of Shakespeare's 
women characters. 

8:00 JAZZ CASUAL — "Woody 
Herman and the Swingin' 
Herd." Discussion by 
Woody Herman and per- 
formance by The Herd. 

8:30 COURT OF REASON — 
"Freedom of Inquiry: 
Should Bigots Be Heard 
on the Campus?" 

Tomorrow Night 
7:30 ABOUT PEOPLE — "Coun- 
sel of Fear." Dr. Maria 



Piers discusses real, unreal 
and neurotic fears. 
9:00 THE OPEN MIND — "Pro- 
file of Dean Rusk." Week- 
ly public affairs program- 
ming. 

Friday Night 

7:00 ASTRONOMY FOR YOU 

— "The Earth in Space." A 
look at the Earth as a 
member of the solar sys- 
tem. 

8:00 SIR KENNETH CLARK 

..ON ART — In this last 
program of the series, Sir 
Kenneth reviews the work 
of landscape painters. 

8:30 SHORT STORIES OF 
SAKI — In concluding this 
series, four more of H. H. 
Munro's short stories are 
dramatized. 

9:30 ART AND ARTISTS: 
GREAT BRITAIN — A 
study of industrial painter 
L. S. Lowry and sculptor 
Reg Butler and their works. 



Guidance 

SENIOR CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 

The next written examination 
for the FOREIGN SERVICE 
CAREER RESERVE OF THE 

U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY 
will be given as a joint exami- 
nation with the Department of 
State on March 7, 1964. It will 
qualify successful candidates for 
further consideration for either 
the Foreign Service Career Re- 
serve of the Agency or for the 
career Foreign Service of the 
Department of State. Candidates 
seeking foreign service employ- 
ment with the U. S. Informa- 
tion Agency should apply before 
the January 20, 1964, closing 
date. Applications may be ob- 
tained in the Placement Office. 

The Placement Office has in- 
formation about the TOBE-CO- 
BURN SCHOOL FOR FASHION 
CAREERS in New York City. 
Fashion fellowships of $1600 are 
available for the one year 
course. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: DAN MIGLIO 



Soon after he arrived at Southern New England Telephone 
Company, Accountant Dan Miglio (B.S., Economics, 1962) 
was assigned to an important Budget Analysis Task Force. 

Though new with the company. Dan was expected to 
thoroughly investigate, analyze and document Plant De- 
partment budget practices. 

Then he joined two other members of the Task Force 
to develop new accounting methods based on his research. 





When his first raise came through much earlier than 
he'd expected, Dan knew his contribution to the Task Force 
had been very much appreciated. His company also showed 
this another way by assigning him to work on a similar 
budget study for the Traffic Department. 

Dan Miglio, like many young men, is impatient to make 
things happen for his company and himself. There are few 
places where such restlessness is more welcomed or re- 
warded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMP/NIES 



TELEPHONE MAN-OF-THE-MONTH 




BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



THREE 



Lines Written On First 
Looking Into The Garnet 

By JOHN BART '64 

This writer found himself faced this week with the task of re- 
viewing the winter issue of the Garnet. After attempting what 
might be called more conventional approaches at literary criticism 
and failing with them, I decided that the only way would be to 
"fight fire with fire". Or perhaps more appropriately, to use "a 
hair of the dog that bit . . .", etc. 

The following expresses the essence of my feelings about the 
work contained in the Garnet. 

Poems, "bitter" poems, 

I know not "how" they mean. 

I only know no "caves of ice", no "pleasure domes" 
Come to "begin the beguine". 

The "burning red", the searching shriek, 

The Buck Rogers contraptions, 

Attempt agony, 

But come out like stale beer. 

Rather weak. 

- 

I look at least for "The poet's eye obscenely seeing", 
I wait for the acrobat to get off the ground. 

But I guess there must be some stray muses at the Lost and Found. 

I do not expect brilliance and vision. 
This cannot be summoned. 
But something else. 

Art is not a finger exercise. 

Not something produced on assignment. 

(No one was more surprised than old Jack Keats when 

He found himself in Darien). 

And please remember even he was speechless. 

Somehow I can understand a season in hell, 
But not one in limbo. 



New York Printmaker 
Shows Works In 
Treat Gallery 

An exhibit of semi-abstract 
filtograph by Helen Gerardia is 
now on display in the Treat 
Gallery on the Bates Campus. 
Helen Gerardia, well - known 
painter and printmaker of New 
York and Woodstock, exponent 
of the semi-abstract stemming 
from the cubism of Metzinger 
and Leger, works in a highly 
subjective fashion. At times she 
employs the geometric optical 
illusion of Albers and Vasarely 
in compositions where sharply 
defined geometric elements are 
massed to suggest still life. 
Gerardia has shown in import- 
ant museums here and abroad. 

The Gallery is open from 2-3 
p.m. every day. 




Lantern Room 
Bert's Drive-in - 

750 Sabattus St. 

HOME OF THE 19c 
HAMBURGER 

(Dine At The 
Lantern Room) 



I 

i 

I 



l'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



limine 



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Ritz Theatre 

Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 

Summer Holiday" I 
Cavalry Command' 

Sun.-Mon. Tues. 

"The Thrill 

Of It All" 

"Paranoiac" 

= 

I 

| — Closed Wednesdays — 



Rob Players To Show 
Stark Mexican Movie 



By SAMUEL WITHERS '65 



I. 



EMPIRE PL ™J 



"I would make films which 
. . . would convey to the audi- 
ence the absolute certainty that 
they DO NOT LIVE IN THE 
BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE 
WORLDS . . . The true "opium 
of the audience" is conformity; 
and the entire, gigantic film 
world is dedicated to the prop- 
agation of this comfortable feel- 
ing, wrapped though it is at 
times in the insidious disguise of 
art." 

Luis Bunuel 

Hundreds of Mexican films 
cross our borders every year. 
For North American tastes they 
are over-romantic, heavy-hand- 
ed and slow. These are the rea- 
sons which confine them to the 
Spanish-language theaters of 
our bigger Cities and border 
towns. The scarcity of good 
Mexican films is indeed lament- 
able because its land and people 
provide an excellent natural set- 
ting and subject matter for 
movie making. It was in Mexico 
that Sergei Eisenstein, the great- 
est director of all time, chose to 
make his magnum opus, the un- 
finished "Que Viva Mexico!" 

The film audience will find 
nothing romantic, heavy-handed, 
or slow about "Los Olvivados" 
released to us as "The Young 
and the Damned". It is a stark, 
uncompromising treatment of 
the " violence and desperation of 
the poverty-haunted forgotten 
youth of Mexico. Winning the 
Grand Prize for direction at the 
Cannes International Film Fes- 
tival in 1951, it is one of the 
finest movies to have emerged 
from Mexico. 

A picture of violence and de- 
pravity, it is not recommended 
to those with sensitive stomachs. 
Unlike other super-realism films 
which detail violence, "The 
Young and the Damned" can 
and does justify its brutal 
scenes. In "Bitter Rice" we saw 
the characters shoot it out in a 
senseless and not terribly subtle 
slaughter-house slaughter. One 

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character after the other bit the 
saw-dust from behind his hunk 
of raw beef and it was difficult 
to justify this carnage in terms 
of the action in the rice pad- 
dies. In "The Young and The 
Damned" the adolescents all 
beat one another to death but at 
least they do so out of sincerity, 
hate, fear, and hunger. 

In 1929 Luis Bunuel collabor- 
ated with Salvador Dali to star- 
tle the art world with "Un Chien 
Andalou" — a classic of sur- 
realism. Although Bunuel con- 
tinued to experiment with sur- 
realism, the intensity of his in- 
volvement with the subject mat- 
ter of this film transforms it to 
super-realism. H e manages, 
however, to insert a purely sur- 
realistic dream- sequence. 

In realistic cinema, the exter- 
nal object is used as raw mater- 
ial for a rational theme of so- 
cial, economic, or scientific na- 
ture. In surrealism, the external 
object is removed from its ha- 
bitual environment and used as 
the material to express irration- 
al visions. Taken out of its con- 
ventional context, and put into 
new relationships it is recreated 
cinematographically into the 
original state of the dream. The 
external object in "The Young 
and the Damned" shifts grounds 
but remains one object. 

"Bitter Rice" fails as a mo- 
tion picture for many reasons. 
First, there are the technical 
failures of poor subtitles and 
unmerciful cutting and censor- 
ship. More important, it fails to 
cohere. It attempts to present a 
dramatic event using the prin- 
ciple of the documentary and 
comes up with a sordid melo- 
drama. "The Young and the 
Damned" achieves success in the 
areas where "Bitter Rice" fails. 
It is technically taught. There is 
absolute obedience to the direc- 
tor. In plot and direction it is 
frightening and flawless. And 
the most important success is in 
Bunuel's fusion of the dramatic 
narrative and documentary re- 
alism. This film, to be shown at 
7:00 and 9:00 on January 17, is 
probably the best so far this sea- 
son. 



AA 
A 



JERRY'S VARIETY 

203 College Street 

ICE CREAM and CANDY 
Of All Kinds 




' Sun.,-Mon.-Tues. — 

JEAN GABIN 
ALAIN DELON 



•V! 



in' 



"ANY NUMBER 
CAN WIN" 

IT'S A NEW "RIFIFI" 
Filmed In France! 



PRISCILLA 

Fri., Sat., Sun. 

"Tarzan Goes to 
India" 

Jock Mahoney 
Simi 
— o — 

"Bachelor in 
Paradise" 

Bob Hope 
Lana Turner 
A Color, CinemaScope Show 

{Continuous Fri. from 5 p. m.| 
Sat. from 1 p.m. 
Sun. from 3 p. m. 

■ ■IB * 



THE 
"HOBB" 

^J* *H 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



Clark's Drug Store 

DRUGS CHEMICALS 
BIOLOGICALS 
Main St. ai Bates St. 

Tel. 783-2011 



A new year brings many 
things, and this new year of 
1964 is no exception. New prob- 
lems and new errors, new deci- 
sions and new delays, new de- 
feats and new hopes — all are 
ushered in. 

But — and as buts go, this is 
a big one — there is also a new 
air, a new atmosphere, so to 
speak. And this new atmosphere, 
in these environs, owe much to 
the foundation of a new organi- 
zation. 

The organization I have in 
mind is the ANDROSCOGGIN 
VALLEY ART ASSOCIATION, 
an organization founded by and 
for all who have a working or 
an academic involvement in the 
arts. 

This Thursday. January 16th. 
will be devoted to the initial 
Charter Membership Meeting of 
the AVAA. It will occur at 7:30 
p. m. in the offices of the arch- 
itectural firm of Alonzo Harri- 
man Associates, 292 Court Street, 
Auburn.* Along with the for- 
malities that accompany the 
registration of the charter mem- 
bers, there will be other activi- 
ties. 

An informal art exhibit will 
be held, offering those in at- 
tendance examples of the more 
recent efforts of the professional 
artists of the region along with 
works submitted by the non- 
professionals. The chairman for 
the evening is Miss Margaret 
Alice Blouin whose indefatigible 
efforts made all this possible. 
Miss Blouin remarked quite of- 
ten that she hopes to see all 
Bates students at the meeting. 

Your reporter, who has 
worked with this most gracious 
lady, expressed some doubts re- 
garding a 100% turn-out of the 
Bates student body; but, so as 
not to appear overly-pessimis- 
tic, he also expressed his belief 
that many of the members of the 
Bates Art Association will no. 
doubt be there. 

Pam Ball '64, leader of the 
Bates contingent, will be among 
those in attendance; and anyone 
else who is planning to come is 
most welcome. I hope to see you 
there and until then mes amis, 
a bientot. 

g.d.g. 




720 

Sabattus BL 
Open Daily 11:00 AM. to 2:00 



*For those who are still some- 
what new to the area, Auburn is 
a suburb of Lewiston, located 
across the River. It sometimes is 
regarded as a city all its own — 
but this is a view held only by 
the natives. 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 

JEWELED 

73 Lisbon St. Lewiston 



FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



Editorials 



Femme Fatality 



Betty Bates is not an event with which we have been in- 
volved during the years, yet it is with mixed feelings that 
we note its passing. 

The WAA board is undoubtedly right that the women are 
not interested in having a Betty Bates Week. The initial 
aims of the program have been lost, and the judging had in- 
deed become a personality contest. 

In view of this we applaud the WAA's discontinuance of 
this empty tradition. Their efforts to find what Bates 
women are interested in, and to plan varied programs 
throughout the year to meet these interests are commend- 
able. It is precisely this kind of action, this willingness to 
change in the hope of something better, which will improve 
Bates College. What we wonder about, however, is the stu- 
dents for whom this action is being taken. 

The women are not interested in Betty Bates, but what 
are they interested in? Only 122 of the 300 who received pe- 
titions asking them to indicate their preferences, bothered 
to return them. 

In chapel, last Monday, Nils Holt spoke on "Bates Beliefs" 
and Norman Bowie asked, "What's Wrong with Liberal Edu- 
cation?" Both, however, were talking about the same thing. 

Bates College has long emphasized "the best interests of 
Bates College and its students." Evidently Bates students 
have made this same division in their thinking, and their 
interests do not include Bates College. 

As Bowie said, Bates students are primarily concerned 
about "My work, My exams, My problems, My interests." 
"College, for him, is merely a means to a good job and 
steady income." 

We deplore this situation, but do not claim to have any 
easy answers to the problem. In part, we think this student 
attitude is engendered by Bates College, and in the "interest 
of Bates College" will initiate in our next issue a series of 
comments about this situation. 

We do think that the WAA Board has acted wisely, and 
suggest that women who have thoughts on this matter let 
the WAA Board know about them. 



Winter Carnival 

The annual Bates Winter Carnival will again be held on 
the weekend after final exams. The Outing Club, after try- 
ing unsuccessfully to gain Extra-Curricular Activity Com- 
mittee approval for a change of date, has decided once more 
to stage Winter Carnival between semesters. 

In recent years, attendance has been declining, but en- 
couraged by the large advance sale, and the promise of 
known entertainment in the Journeymen, the Outing Club 
hopes that this year's Carnival will be a success. 

If it is not, then serious consideration will be given to dis- 
continuing Winter Carnival. 

If, in the light of declining attendance, a change of date 
continues to be vetoed, then it is almost certain that Winter 
Carnival will become another addition to the growing list of 
discontinued events at Bates College. 



"Bates 




Student 



Letter To The Editor 

To the Editor: 

Professor Tagliabue's "Notes 
From A November - December 
Journal" (Dec. 11 STUDENT) 
is a tremendously moving and 
beautiful piece of writing. 

After reading it, one compre- 
hends more completely the deep 
admiration many of you hold for 
the extremely talented man. 

If you have not already done 
so, do send a copy to Mrs. Ken- 
nedy. 

Sincerely, 
Mrs. Henry Jurgens 



Hungarians Play 
With Delicacy, 
Precision 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Wilson '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Sick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

Alan Cruickshank '65 Advertising Manager 

Alan Hartwell '66 Photographer 

John Bart '64 '. Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

Sally M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66, 
Judy Marden '66, Sue Lord '66, Anne Ganley '66, Rebecca Nally 
'66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67, Carla Swanson '67, Kathy 
Southhall '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 

Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during- the college year. Tel. 
783-6661. Printed at Auburn Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine. 
Entered as second-class matter at the I^ewiston Post Office Jan. 80, 1913, 
under the «ct of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



By JOAN TOBEY '64 

. . . O chestnut tree, great 

rooted blossomer, 
Are you the leaf, the blos- 
som or the bole? 
O body swayed to music, O 

brightening glance, 
How can we know the 
dancer from the dance?" 
William Builer Yeals 

With delicate touch and danc- 
ing intensity, the Philharmonia 
Hungarica conducted by Mil- 
tiades Caridis presented a con- 
cert on January 6 at the Lewis- 
ton High School. The program 
for the evening was: Marosszek 
Dances by Zoltan Kodaly, Sym- 
phony No. 8 in F major by 
Ludwig van Beethoven, Hungar- 
ian Pictures by Bela Bartok, 
and Overture-Fantasia by Peter 
Ilyitch Tschaikowsky. 

The first piece, Marosszek 
Dances, opened on a strong low 
note played by the strings and 
woodwinds; these gave way to 
soft and dancing solos by flute, 
oboe, and violin. Throughout the 
number, one could feel the 
strength in the strings and in- 
ter-weaving of the instruments. 

This was a brilliant and clear 
dance, glittering, but without os- 
tentation. Its world premiere 
performance was given in 1930 
by the New York Philharmonic 
Orchestra under the direction of 
Arturo Toscanini. The thematic 
material for this was taken from 
traditional melodies which Ko- 
daly collected in the Marosszek 
district. 

The Hungarian Pictures were 
five small compositions played 
in a lively way. Four of these 
were exhilerating in their dance 
and variation. The fifth, a soft 
piece called "Melody," opened 
in utter stillness, it seemed, as 
the woodwinds gently played. 

This quietness had real 
strength, though, as strings 
playing tremelo (playing very 
quick, repeated, short notes like 
a trembling in the wrist move- 
ment) and base tones gave real 
vibrancy and depth of creation. 
The piece then returned to the 
opening quietness. 

The orchestra played with real 
feeling and good quality of tone 
in the final number, Overture- 
Fantasia: Romeo and Juliet. The 
balance of parts would give way 
to screaming intensity of strings, 
crashing cymbals, smooth violas, 
and roll of the timpani, all to 
give a real feeling of strife. 

The Philharmonic Hungarica 
seemed very capable in its or- 
chestral qualities. They had 
great depth of feeling as shown 
in their whole performance. 
Conducting the entire program 
without a musical score, Caridis 
directed them with full intensity 
of mind and body. The concert 
was beautiful, precise, and of a 
fine quality. 



Stringer Criticizes 
Cigarette Advertising 



Exploitation Cited 

The following article was 
written by William H. Stringer, 
Chief of the Washington Bureau 
of the Christian Science Moni- 
tor, and appeared in the July 
13, 1963 issue of that newspaper 
in the state of the Nation's col- 
umn. It was entitled "To Teen- 
Agers Who Smoke," and is re- 
printed in the Bates STUDENT 
with the full permission of Mr. 
Stringer. Though written before 
the recent Surgeon General's 
report on the use of tobacco, in- 
dicating a positive correlation 
between smoking and the inci- 
dence of certain diseases, it pre- 
sents a valid and informed point 
of view of smoking. 



This column is addressed 
mainly to teen-agers who smoke 
— ■ and to any adults who might 
be reading over their shoulder. 

It has a single message: 
Friend, you're being exploited. 

SOUTH OF PARIS 

By PETER REICH '65 

London, January 2. I had 

lunch with Prexy last week, at 
the Dorchester. Evelyn Breck 
and Emily Blowen made it down 
from Manchester on their way 
to France for some skiing. The 
Prexys had a nice room with a 
view on the Taylor-Burton suite. 
We talked about that for a while 
and then got on to other things. 

From what Prexy says, it 
seems that fewer sophomores 
than last year have put in ap- 
plications for the Bates Junior 
Year Abroad program. It is still 
not too late for freshmen, and a 
few sophomores could probably 
still swing it. Bates is not only 
offering its students the oppor- 
tunity to learn in a larger Uni- 
versity, and to travel, it is also 
giving liberal arts students a 
chance to learn a whole new 
way of life in a foreign country. 

It is very difficult to give rea- 
sons why not to go, unless one 
really doesn't want to. Financial- 
ly and scholastically, the Bates 
JYA program is a success. 

Credit Given 

If students follow a program 
of courses which corresponds in 
some way to what he misses at 
Bates, the Curriculum Commit- 
tee usually gives full credit for 
a year's work. Thus nothing is 
lost academically and a great 
deal is gained. 

Financially, I expect to spend 
this year about as much or 
less than what I would have 
spent at Bates. And that in- 
cludes passage to and from Eu- 
rope, room, board, tuition, inci- 
dentals, and travelling in Europe 
before school started, Christmas, 
and Easter vacations. 

Evelyn, Emily, and I agreed, 
in our talk with Prexy, that this 
year is proving to be invaluable 
educationally, socially, cultural- 
ly, and emotionally. Not only 
are we getting a more liberal 
education, but we are also 
learning what other educational 
systems are — learning indeed 
exactly what a liberal education 
is, that we can better appreciate 
and criticize the values of the 
liberal arts education. 



In the language of old Broad- 
way, Hello sucker! 

Exploited? Sure, the tobacco 
companies have been trying to 
get you to smoke. And you've 
succumbed. 

Now the companies seem to 
be acquiring "morals." In a re- 
cent statement George V. Allen, 
president of the Tobacco Insti- 
tute, said the industry's position 
is that "smoking is a custom for 
adults." That's recent. 

Because here's a last month's 
magazine for hot rodders, the 
young enthusiasts who build 
up, beef up, paint up old auto- 
mobiles. Most kids can drive at 
16. Hot rodders come in sizes 
14-years-old and up. On the 
back of this magazine is a cig- 
arette ad. The young fellow 
smoking might be 20, or 16. To 
whom do you think this adver- 
tisement is addressed? You 
answer. 

* * * 

These people has been trying 
to fasten a habit on you. And 
millions of you have been 
lapping it up. 

Just now, six major cigarette 
manufacturers have met and is- 
sued a statement that "it is not 
the intent of the industry to pro- 
mote or encourage smoking 
among youth." They said that 
persons featured in advertising 
"should be, and should appear to 
be, adults." 

Sen. Maurine Neuberger (D) 
of Oregon, who's bringing out a" 
book on smoking this fall, calls 
this a modest action. She says 
that "the American law courts 
are moving inexorably toward 
cigarette manufacturer liability 
to lung cancer victims" and sees 
the time when the industry will 
have to issue frequent warnings 
to its customers, to avoid law- 
suits. 

Last month Canadian tobacco 
manufacturers announced they 
would not run cigarette com- 
mercials on radio or television 
before 9 p.m. In May the Na- 
tional Congress of Parents and 
Teachers voted to step up its 
campaign against teen - age 
smoking. The American Cancer 
Society is taking similar action. 
In some high schools, clubs, and 
groups have been formed to dis- 
courage smoking. People are 

waking up, you see. 

* * * 

What gave you the idea, first 
of all, that it was hep and 
sophisticated to smoke? Maybe 
it was the example of your par- 
ents. Maybe others in the crowd 
smoke. Maybe you're just show- 
ing your freedom from society, 
or from parental discipline. But 
you're being exploited, just the 
same. Smoking isn't going to do 
you any good. And there's very 
strong physical evidence that it 
does you harm. That isn't scare 
talk, it's common sense, like 
telling you not to drink DDT. 

Is abstinence a worthy objec- 
tive? Think it over. And think 
of all those ads picturing young 
people and athletes and youth's 
folk heroes, all puffing away. 
Even some liquor companies 
urge moderation in their ads. 
Ever see a cigarette ad urging 
moderation? 

These companies will have a 
rising public health concern to 
deal with. You've got only your- 
self to handle. Going to continue 
to be misused? 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



FIVE 



Memo From The Gnome-In-Chief 



By WILLIAM HISS '66 

To: all gnomes 

Re: general gnome policies 

1. Tools: You boys are going 
to have to use the prescribed 
tools from now on. We're getting 
too efficient. Leaves are to be 
collected with shovels and 
wheelbarrows. Snow is to be re- 
moved by the use of coal shov- 
els and brooms; and throw it 
somewhere where it will have to 
be moved again. 

Only one bucketful of sand at 
a time is to be taken from the 
gnome shack. When the snow 
clears you will be expected to 



sweep up the sand where you 
had spread it. In the spring I 
hear a lot of griping about the 
hand mowers. This spring we 
will have sit-down mowers op- 
erated with foot pedals. 

2. Pinching: Pinching the 
girls is expressly forbidden. I've 
had a number of complaints on 
this. You are allowed to pinch 
the housemothers; I've had a 
number of requests. Now I rea- 
lize that J.B. is a long walk, 
but it's good for morale. 

3. Working in groups: In the 

past, it has been the firm policy 
of the organization that when- 



ever two or more gnomes are to- 
gether, that only one may work 
at a time. You have been very 
g<5bd about adhering to this, but 
now the policy is going to be 
extended, so that whenever one 
gnome is within sight of an- 
other, only one may work at a 
time. 

4. Bomb shelters: The bomb 

shelter under the gnome shack 
is for our use. The shelter un- 
der the administration building 
is for the students, faculty, ad- 
ministration and friends of the 
college. Attendance will be ta- 
ken. An unexcused absence will 




with a 

Canal Bank Insured 
Education Loan 



+ BORROW up to $10,000 for Four Yean 

^ TAKE up to 8 yean to Repay 

YOU Borrow One Amount _ 

You or. the College will receive an annua! or semi- 
annual disbursement. 

* YOU are INSURED for the Full Amount 

In the event of your death, the college will continue to 
receive the regular disbursement — at no cost to your 
estate. 

* YOUR LOAN COVERS ALL NORMAL COLLEGE 

EXPENSES 



For complete information, mail the attached coupon or Bring it in to your nearest Canal Office 

Portland 

Middle St. Congress Sq. Forest Ave. 
Monument Sq. Pine Tree North Gate 

South Portland Old Orchard Beach 

Yarmouth Scarborough 
Gorham Saco 
Falmouth Biddeford 
Windham Lewiston 
Brunswick 



Please send me full information on tho 
Canal Inwrod Education Loan. 



Name: 



i*.f 



Corporation 



Address: 



...«••••••••••••••••••• 



mean an academic overcut and 
instantaneous death. The stu- 
dents in the shelter will have 
their choice of toilet facilities or 
food. 

In the event of an attack the 



"anal Bank: Box 231, Peed SI. , . _ ^ 



MODULATIONS 

By LAUREL BOOTH '66 
During the semester WRJR 
offered a training program for 
all students seeking a broadcast- 
ing license. To obtain a license, 
the students studied the policy 
of the F.C.C. as well as the radio 
station's console system. Those 
people successfully completing 
the program included: James 
Filakosky '67, David Lloyd '67, 
Ted Foster '65, Robert Parker 
'66, Lee Pollock '64, Miles Corn- 
thwaite '64, Bruce Harrison '67, 
Albert Armington '67, David 
Sutherland '67 and Lois Rider 
'67. 

Directly after finals, WRJR 
will conduct a campus-wide 
survey, affording the opportunity 
to contribute criticisms and sug- 
gestions concerning the station's 
programming and coverage on 
our campus. The purpose of this 
survey is to indicate how WRJR 
may better serve the Bates com- 
munity. 



following procedure will go into 
effect: first, the pool and ping- 
pong tables from our recreation 
room are moved into the shel- 
ter. Next, somebody will go get 
all the Glenn Miller records from 
the Chase Hall Dance Commit- 
tee. The plumbing in the other 
bomb shelter will be turned off. 
There is only one bathroom, but 
with a thousand people using it, 
they can waste a lot of water. 

All heat and electricity in the 
buildings will be turned off, but 
the B.C. lights will be left on in 
case any couples are locked out 
of the shelter. Finally, the facul- 
ty and students have requested 
that in the event of a direct hit 
on downtown Lewiston, that the 
Hathorn bell be rung one hun- 
dred times. 



Art Contest 

This winter there will be 
held an Art Competition 
among any Bates students 
interested. The winning 
work will be exhibited in 
the Treat Gallery in Petti- 
grew. Please see Dr. Goldai 
(104 Hathorn) for further 
details of the competition. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




RgALTHEM CAKPS FA6-T6£ GUNTHBR — TJ GOT 
A FINAL eXAMTDTAKE IN A FEW MINUTE5. 9 



BEDARD'S 

MAINE'S ONLY 

DRIVE-IN PHARMACY 

Phone 4-7521 Lewiston, Maine 

Cor. College and Sabalius Sts. 

_ 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



Dial 782-7421 Daytime 
Dial 784-8165 Nights 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
Lowest Prices in Town 

TURCOTTE'S 
GARAGE 

Lewiston's Only Radio Dispatch 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 

Leonard Turcotte, Prop. 
865 Sabaitus Si. Lewiston 



BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE at 

ADVANCE AUTO SALES, INC. 

24 FRANKLIN STREET AUBURN. MAINE 

Dial 784-5775 or 782-2686 

VALIANT-PLYMOUTH CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL 
5-Year and 50,000 Mile Guarantee 

— GUARANTEED USED CARS — 
Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates-Affiliated People 



* 



six 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



Final Exam Schedule 



Monday, Jan. 20 

8:00 A. M. 
French 331 
Government 100 
Psychology 311 
Religion 100 
Speech 245 
10: 15 A. M. 

Secretarial 113 
(3:00 sect. - Libbey) 
1:15 P.M. 
English 401 
Government 450 
History 217 
Mathematics 203 
^ Sociology 410 
Speech 231 
3:30 P.M. 
French 241 
(Hathorn) 
Tuesday, Jan. 21 
8:00 A.M. 

Cultural Heritage .301 
10: 15 A. M. 
English 100 
Speech 100 
Speech 405 
1:15 P.M. 
French 131 
Government 219 
Mathematics 411 
Wednesday, Jan. 22 
8:00 A.M. 
French 103 
German 201 
German 251 
German 353 
German 453 
Philosophy 413 
Spanish 103 
1:15 P.M. 
Biology 221 
Economics 100 
Economics 201 
English 301 
French 352 
History 275 

Thursday, Jan. 23 

8:00 A.M. 
Biology 231 
Biology 339 
Chemistry 401 
English 241 
German 311 
Psychology 240 
10: 15 A. M. 
Geology 203 
Government 327 
Mathematics 314 
Sociology 100 
1:15 P.M. 
Astronomy 101 
Chemistry 251 
Chemistry 305 
Economics 217 
English 334 
German 421 
History 313 
Religion 211 
Friday, Jan. 24 
8:00 A.M. 
Biology 101 
Government 331 
Philosophy 200 
1:15 P.M. 
Chemistry 105 
Music 201 

(Pettigrew) 
Psychology 401 
Spanish 111 
Speech 221 
Secretarial 113 

(1:00 sect. - Libbey) 
3:30 P.M. 

Economics 321 
History 214 
Sociology 219 



Saturday, Jan. 25 

8: 00 A. M. 
Economics 301 
Education 331 
History 115 
10: 15 A. M. 
Education 343 
Physics 271 
Physics 315 
Sociology 241 
Secretarial 215 
(Libbey) 
1:15 P.M. 
Biology 431 
English 211 
Government 214 
History 315 
Physics 371 
Russian 201 
3:30 P. M. 
Spanish 101 
Spanish 301 
(Hathorn) 

Monday, Jan. 27 

8:00 A.M. 
English 111 
French 207 
Philosophy 325 
Physics 474 
Sociology 301 • 
1:15 P.M. 

Cultural Heritage 401 
3:30 P.M. 
English 200 

Tuesday, Jan. 28 

8:00 A.M. 

Biology 311 

Education 441 

German 101 
1:15 P.M. 

Economics 315 

English 341 

French 101 

Geology 101 

Mathematics 301 
P. E. 309M 

Psychology 350 

Sociology 315 

Wednesday, Jan. 29 

8:00 A.M. 

Psychology 201 
10:15 A.M. 

Health 101M 

Health 101W 
1:15 P.M. 

History 225 

Mathematics 103 

Mathematics 105 
3:30 P.M. 

Chemistry 313 

Spanish 241 
(Hathorn) 

Thursday, Jan. 30 

8:00 A.M. 
Biology 214 
Chemistry 101 
Chemistry 421 
Economics 301 
English 231 
Geology 316 
History 227 
History 261 
Mathematics 106 
Philosophy 369 
Physics 331 

(Carnegie) 
Spanish 401 

Unless otherwise indicated, all 
final examinations will be held 
in the gymnasium. 



I 



Down East Classic 



December 11 - at Bates 




L/owneasi Classic 


- at Bangor 


Bates (76) 


FG 


FT Pts 


First Round 


Dec. 


27 




Beisswanger 


5 


7 


1 7 


Pts 


Cummings 


6 


3 




Bates (68) 


FG 


FT 


Hine 


1 


0 


2 


Beisswanger 


O 


n 


ft 

u 


Beaudry 


6 


0 


12 


Cummings 


3 


6 


12 




7 


2 


16 


Hine 


o 
«J 


i 
l 


7 


Stevens 


1 


0 


2 


Beaudry 


1 

J- 


i 

J. 


3 


Gardiner 


o 


0 


0 


Krzynowek 


7 


3 


17 

J. 1 


Johannesen — 


1 


1 


3 


Stevens 


3 


3 


g 


Johnson 


2 


0 


4 


Gardiner 


o 


1 


1 


Mischler 


2 


1 


5 


Johannesen 


o 


2 


2 


Wyman 


0 


0 


0 


Johnson 


3 


o 


ft 










Mischler 


o 

m 


i 

± 


K 

U 


Totals 


31 


14 


76 


Wyman 


o 


n 




Maine (88) 


FG 


FT Pts 






~ ~ ~ 




Giuene 


10 


6 


26 


Totals 


25 


18 


68 


Svendsen 


9 


7 


25 


Strang 


4 


0 


8 


Colbv (751 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


Brewer 


10 


1 


21 


Federman 


1 


8 


30 


Woodbury 


3 


1 


7 


btevens 


o 
o 


3 


9 


Harnum 


0 


1 


1 


Dyhrberg 


2 


1 


5 




• 






Stone 


11 


3 


25 


Totals 


36 


16 


88 


Oberg 


0 


1 


1 


Half time Score: 


Maine 42, Bates 


Swartz 


0 


0 


0 


41. Officials: Gentile, Busa. 




McNabb 


2 


0 


4 










Gibbons 


0 


0 


0 


TRACK MEET 






Eck 


0 


0 


0 


Due to Graduate Record 




Astor 


0 


1 


1 


Exams, the Saturday 


track 




Phillips 


0 


0 


0 


meet will be 


split into two 












sections. The 


discus 


event 




Totals 




17 


75 


will commence at 3:30 


p. m. 




29 


and the exciting running 




Halftime Score: Colby 41, Bates 


events at 6:15 


p. m. 






32. Officials: Whytock, DeRenzo. 




Downeast Classic - at Bangor 



Bates (89) 

Beisswanger 

Cummings 

Hine 

Beaudry 

Krzynowek 

Stevens 

Gardiner 

Johannesen 

Johnson 

Mischler 

Totals 

Maine (96) 

McGonagle 

Harnum 

Vanidestine 

Woodbury 

McKinnon 

Svendsen 

Gillene 

Strang 

Brewer 

Flahive 

Spreng 

Dunham 

Totals 



Halftime Score: Maine 45, Bates 
33. Score at End of Regulation: 
Bates 79, Maine 79. Score After 
First Overtime: Bates 85, Maine 
85. Officials: Whytock, DiRenzo. 



tie 


Dec. 


28 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


2 


O 




8 


8 


24 


0 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


8 


7 


23 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


1 


3 


0 


6 


0 


0 


0 


7 


5 


19 


30 


29 


89 


F G 


pip 

FT 


Pts 


5 


0 


10 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


4 


6 


1 


13 


3 


2 


8 


7 


5 


19 


7 


2 


16 


5 


2 


12 


1 


1 


3 


0 


1 


1 


3 


0 


6 


0 


0 


0 


39 


18 


96 



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4 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



SEVEN 



WAA News 

By MARCIA FLYNN '65 

The "ole matrons" of Rand 
came through the volleyball 
season with a victory and the 
other teams are wondering how 
those Ageless Demons of the 
game teethered to a victory?? In 
any case, we have to hand them 
the win on a "dinner plate" as 
the team is having a private 
dinner tonight in the small din- 
ing room at Rand. 

A tie is promised for the 
second place winner. Page 
Four and Cheney House each 
won seven games and met each 
other last Friday for a very 
close contest. Page just squeaked 
out a win over Cheney to end 
the season in a tie. 

Many Thanks 

Thanks must be rendered to 
Lynn Avery at this time for 
sponsoring a very successful 
season for W.A.A. Only two 
games had to be cancelled due 
to a lack of players — a far 
better record than those in past 
seasons. Each team was allowed 
to play every other team instead 
of those teams in its own league 
— a system not attempted in 
years past. With one good season 
in the past, let's have an equal- 
ly good basketball season! 



TV RENTALS - SALES 

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783-2269 
783-0608 




Bobcat Of The Week 

Selected this week for Bobcat 
honors is junior track star Tom 
Bowditch. Tom, in the track 
meet with Northeastern this 
past Friday night, set a school 
and personal record of 6 ft., 5->4 
in. in the high jump. The old 
mark was 6 ft., 4% in. 

Tom, a biology major, is a na- 
tive of Rye, New Hampshire. As 
a high schooler at Portsmouth, 



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(Hartwell photo) 



N. H., Tom was high pointman 
on his track squad as a senior, 
and was the recipient of the 
Howard Hunt trophy, symbolic 
of the most valuable track per- 
former. 

We congratulate Tom on a 
most noteworthy achievement. 

Two Soccer Men 
Place ALL-N.E. 

Two Bates soccer players were 
recently named to the honorable 
mention N.C.A.A All-New Eng- 
land Intercollegiate Soccer team. 
Representing the Garnet are 
right fullback Bob Thompson 
and center forward Bob Lanz. 
Both players were previously 
selected to the states' All Maine 
team. 

Three players from Colby's 
state championship team were 
selected. They are Dave Kelley, 
Starback Smith and Jean-Paul 
N. Joya. Bowdoin placed only 
one man, Hans Hede. 

The players receive an indi- 
vidual award and the school re- 
ceives a plaque for the honor. 



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Trackmen Prepare For 
Sat. Meet With Maine 



Coach Walt Slovenski's in- 
door track team is preparing 
hopefully in the cage for its 
Saturday encounter with the 
mighty University of Maine. The 
meet will be held here, and the 
Garnet hopes to extend its 
streak of three consecutive vic- 
tories at home against its arch 



five years: Maine has been con- 
sistently strong and Bates con- 
sistently weak in the weights. 
He also stresses the fact that 
this is "the" meet, the one the 
boys try hardest for. 

Bates has the advantage in 
the sprints, hurdles, and high 
jump. The Garnet relay is also 




Chris Mossberg goes over 12 feei (Hartwell photo) 



rival. 

On the alternate years, Maine 
has won four straight in its own 
cage, giving strength to the 
adage that home teams are fa- 
vorably influenced by their sur- 
rounding. 

As for advantages, Maine has 
a decided one in the weights. 
They are expected to sweep all 
three events, as they usually do 
in the annual meet. A three 
event sweep means twenty-seven 
points, and it only takes sixty- 
two to win. Hence, Bates has its 
work cut out for it. 

But the word from Coach Slo- 
venski is that the home team 
has a very good chance to take 
the meet. For he points out that 
there has been no difference in 



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very strong. 

The keenest competition 
should be in the 1,000 yard run, 
the 600 yard run, and the two 
mile run, which promises to be 
the best race of the day. Hein- 
rich and Judkins of Maine will 
face McKusick and Wilhelmsen 
of Bates in the latter race. Fal- 
quer and Spruce meet Bates' 
Ford and Binnewig in the 600. 
The broad jump is also termed 
as a toss-up. 

With regard to last Saturday's 
trouncing at Northeastern, Coach 
Slovenski felt little dismay. He 
pointed out that Northeastern is 
perhaps the best indoor track 
team in New England, and they 
should go undefeated. 

Outstanding in the meet for 
Bates was high jumper Tom 
Bowditch, who broke the former 
school record of 6 ft. 4% in. with 
a leap of 6 ft. in. Also, all 
four of the Bates pole-vaulters 
eclipsed the twelve-foot mark. 
Chris Mossberg won the event 
at 12 ft., 6 in., followed by 
teammates Tom Hiller, Bob 
Kramer and Jon Olson. 

As many students as possible 
are urged to come out to cheer 
for Bates in the "battle of the 
home team victories". 



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As Sliver Sees It 

By MARK SILVERSTEIN '64 
On January 6 at approximate- 
ly 7:50 p.m., Mike Washington 
dumped in a charity toss to of- 
ficially inaugurate the 1964 in- 
tramural basketball season. With 
the area and play of former 
Smith South hoopster Walter 
Lasher and fine team direction 
of big John Devendorf, Smith 
North rolled over an ailing (no 
talent) Smith South combine 
44-27. 

In A league action, a speedy 
Smith Middle quintet, sparked 
by the playmaking of Bob Lanz, 
completely destroyed the West 
Parker cagers 65-41. Despite the 
early loss of Ralph Whittum to 
a sprained ankle, the "Middies" 
proved that they have the 
horses to head the field in the 
A League competition. 

The big action in the net cir- 
cuit, however, came last Satur- 
day when a highly-touted John 
Bertram club met head on with 
the talented Off-Campus play- 
boys and found them anything 
but playful. J.B. showed their 
strength, but the O.C. octet had 
too many shooters to be denied 
as they routed the determined 
J.B. squad, 73-62. 

Mark Silverstein set up shop 
in the corner for 21 markers, 
while Jim Wallach had a lease 
on the base line as he contribut- 
ed to the cause. The big sur- 
prise was Art Agnos, who dust- 
ed off some old moves to riddle 
the J.B. defenses for 21. John 
Lanza played outstanding de- 
fense while notching an addi- 
tional 6 buckets. 

J.B., still reeling from their 
day-old loss, regrouped Sunday 
afternoon to stagger past a fired- 
up Roger Bill five, 49-48. In the 
closest game of the young sea- 
son, J.B. rode out the storm 
with Bob Thompson and Ron 
Vance at the helm steering 
their crew to a winning port. 
Nevertheless, Doug Macko and 
his henchmen showed they are 
capable of causing extreme 
havoc in the A loop. 

Other action throughout the 
circuit saw J.B.'s B I club sneak 
by Roger Bill 30-27, while in B II 
Off-Campus kept up their win- 
ning ways. On Thursday, Janu- 
ary 9, the playboys, led by 
Bloomenthal and W h e 1 e n , 
warmed up with a 34-17 thump- 
ing of John Bertram and came 
back Sunday to take the mea- 
sure of East Parker 39-33. An- 
other B II contest brought Roger 
Bill on top of Roger Bill 31-24, 
while in C, J.B. set aside the 
Smith South threat. In C II ac- 
tion West Parker defeated East 
Parker 26-18, and East Parker 
defined the word "destruction" 
in a 39-6 "horendo" over a com- 
pletely undermined Roger Bill 
club. 

I must extend congratulations 
to a fine John Bertram volley- 
ball team as they wrapped up 
their second A league champion- 
ship. Thank you, Walt Lasher, 
for assistance in writing this 
outstanding article. 



.: Louis P. Nolin :. 




Corner Ash and Lisbon Sts. 
Member American Gem Soc. 
WATCH REPAIRING 
AND DIAMONDS 



EIGHT 



BATES STUDENT, JANUARY 15, 1964 



Cagers Drop Talented Ml T., 63 - 56 




By DON DELMORE '64 

Bates shocked a favored M.I.T. squad Saturday night 63-56 in Alumni gymnasium. 
The hustling Bobcats registered this prestige victory after being upset 76-69 earlier in the 
week by the Colby Mules, a defeat which threw a wrench into any aspirations for a State 
Series championship. 



By NICK BASBANES 
In sports, an always important segment of the game is the 
crowd. A boistrous gathering of partisan fans can often help 
to swing a close contest into a happy victory. And when the 
crowd keeps itself within the bounds of decency, it is an ac- 
cepted and desirable fixture of the game. All the victors 
can do in such a situation is put out as hard as they can, 
hope for the best, and hold their composure. The best way 
to quiet a noisy crowd is to give a top performance. 

I mention this because Bates fans are usually rabid and 
enthusiastic about their teams. All you have to do to see this 
in evidence is to take in a home basketball game. The crowd, 
like the Bobcat its school so aptly personifies, is a snarling 
and mean kind of monster. The cat in the stands adds an 
element of color and enthusiasm, comedy and spirit to the 
play of the game. Take for example last Wednesday's game 
with Colby. The game was a crucial one. Both teams were 
in contention for state laurels. Bates had won the first en- 
counter at Colby, a state upset, and was hoping to repeat 
the same at home. But Colby was hot. And so were the 
fans. The throaty throng focused its attention on three dif- 
ferent areas: the officials, a star, and a common (I use the 
word loosely) player. 

The crowd cajoled the officials for perfectly rational rea- 
sons: they were poor. The quality of officiating seen this 
year has been consistently bad. And this isn't said in a sour 
grapes manner, for the calls went bad against both sides. 
And in addition to making bad calls, they missed obvious 
ones. The fans were incensed, and let the arbiters knows 
about it. 

As for the star, because he is good, he is an obvious ob- 
ject for harassment. Instead of letting the noise rattle his 
performance, he led his team to victory. But he loosened up 
once late in the second half. Replaced by a substitute, and 
with victory evidently secure, he contemptuously shot an 
eagle at his dissident admirers. When he could have let his 
fine achievement stand as an answer to the crowd, he in- 
stead tarnished his golden image by succumbing to the 
pressure. 

The common player received the sting of scorn for sev- 
eral reasons. In the first half, as he and a Bates player were 
pursuing a loose ball, the whistle blew for a jump ball. Em- 
bittered by failure, he pushed the Bates player, but wasn't 
called for the foul. Before they were to jump, he pushed 
away the extended hand of the Bates player. The crowd 
was receptive to this unsportsmanlike conduct. He was 
plagued through the rest of the game. In the second half, 
after three passionate attempts, he finally scored his sole 
points of the game, and proudly waved at his tormentors. He 
had a lot to be proud of: he showed himself to be both a 
poor sport and a mediocre player. 

To conclude, I remind all of you that tonight we meet our 
friends from Bowdoin in the gym. Show up — Harry will 
be here. 



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Open In Zone 

Colby opened the game in a 
zone defense to reduce the 
number of clear-outs the 'Cats 
have employed so successfully 
this campaign. Bates again 
showed the Mules a zone press. 
However, the visitors overcame 
it and managed to bring the ball 
upcourt more often than not. 

The 'Cats jumped off to a 2-0 
lead on a Bill Beisswanger jump 
shot from near the top of the 
key. Ken Federman tied it at 
2-2 on a push from the side. At 
this point the game went into 
a seesaw battle throughout the 
next six minutes. Colby finally 
began to widen their lead mid- 
way through the first half. 
Sparked by John Stevens and 
Ken Stone, the Mules opened a 
39-21 lead with only 2:10 of the 
first half action remaining. 
Not Close Enough 

Two quick baskets by Carl 
"Ingo" Johannesen and one by 
Don Beaudry cut it to a nearly 
respectable edge of 41-27 at half- 
time. It had been a long twenty 
minutes for the Bobcats, as they 
were hurt especially in the re- 
bounding department. The Col- 
by forecourt trio of Stevens, 
Federamn, and Larry Dyhrberg 
proved too much for the smaller 
'Cat forwards to handle. 

An inspired Bobcat quintet 
came back, now ready to play 
their exciting type of ball so well 
called "run and gun". The 'Cats 
reeled off ten straight points and 
closed the gap to 43-37 after 
only three minutes of action. 
However, the Mules refused to 
fold and bounced back to open 
up another lead of 61-44 with 
but eight minutes remaining. 

At this point, Seth "The Shot" 
Cummings took over and 
brought the 'Cats back into con- 
tention. The rebounding of Ingo 
and steals by Ted Krzynowek 
led to seven straight baskets by 
Cummings, making the score 68- 
63 with 2:30 remaining. The 
'Cats looked for Seth each time 
down court and the lanky junior 
forward calmly responded with 
his greatest half ever. 

Cummings High 

The dramatic rally fell short, 
however, as time ran out and 
the Mules squeaked out their 76- 
69 victory. Cummings led all 
scorers with twenty-six points, 
twenty-one coming in his re- 
markable second half perform- 
ance. Steady Don Beaudry 
chipped in with fourteen, and 
Ingo pulled in ten rebounds to 
lead in that department. Colby 
was paced by Stone with twen- 
ty, Federman with nineteen, and 
Stevens with seventeen. 

The 'Cats bounced back Sat- 
urday night to down the Engin- 
eers 63-56 in a low-scoring 



FERN'S 
TAXI 

784-5469 




Fight for ball beneath the nets (Hartwell photo) 



thriller. It was a big win for 

Bates, as M.I.T. entered the 
game with an impressive 9-3 rec- 
ord, as opposed to the 2-6 record 
of the host squad. 

The 'Cats jumped off to an 
early lead and managed to pro- 
tect it throughout the contest. 
The first half ended with Bates 
on top 32-26. The Bobcats were 
doing an excellent job in the re- 
bounding department, keeping 
M.I.T.'s tall and talented center 
Bill Eagleson away from the 
hoop time and again. 

The Engineers held their own 
throughout the second half as 
the fast-breaking Bobcats began 
to show signs of tiring. Coach 



Peck here inserted his second 
unit with only six minutes re- 
maining and Bates on top 40-36. 
The strategy worked superbly as 
Bob Mischler, Bob Johnson, and 
Will Gardiner hit for quick 
buckets and the 'Cats spurted 
into another lead. The rested 
starting unit returned with 2:10 
remaining and iced the victory, 
pulling away as time ran out. 

Krzynowek Leads 

Hustling Ted Krzynowek, 
playing his finest game of the 
young season, led all scorers, 
dropping in seventeen big 
points, while Mischler added 
eleven. Jack Moter paced 
M.I.T.'s cause with fifteen points 
and thirteen rebounds. 



BATES 


- M.I.T. 




BATES 


• COLBY 




Bates (63) 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


Bates (69) 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


Beisswanger 


4 


1 


9 


Beisswanger 


2 


2 


6 


Cummings 


1 


5 


7 


Cummings 


12 


2 


26 


Johannesen 


3 


0 


6 


Johannesen 


2 


2 . 


6 


Beaudry 


2 


0 


4 


Beaudry 


7 


0 


14 


Krzynowek 


7 


3 


17 


Mischler 


2 


3 


7 








Stevens, F. 


1 


1 


3 


Stevens 


0 


0 


0 


Gardiner 


0 


0 


0 


Gardiner 


1 


0 


2 


Hine 


0 


0 


0 


Hine 


1 


1 


3 


Johnson 


1 


0 


2 


Johnson 


2 


0 


4 


Krzynowek 


2 


1 


5 


Mischler 


5 


1 


11 


Heckman 


0 


0 


0 


Wyman 


0 


0 


0 


Totals 


29 


11 


69 










Colby (76) 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


Totals 


16 


11 


63 


Stevens, J. 


5 


7 


17 


M.I.T. (56) 


FG 


FT 


Pts 


Federman 


6 


7 


19 


Mazola 


2 


4 


8 


Dyhrberg 
Stone 


4 
7 


1 
6 


9 
20 


Moter 


6 


3 


15 


Oberg 


1 


0 


2 


Eagleson 


5 


2 


12 


Gibbons 


0 


0 


0 


Grady 


5 


2 


12 


McNabb 


0 


1 


1 


Yin 


2 


2 


6 


Swartz 


2 


2 


6 


Flick 


0 


1 


1 


Davis 


0 


0 


0 


Alusic 


0 


0 


0 


Phillips 


1 


0 


2 


McQuilken 


1 


0 


2 


















Totals 


26 


24 


76 


Totals 


21 


14 


56 


Half time Score: 








Colby 


41, Bates 


Half time Score: 


Bates 


32, M.I.T. 


27. Officials: Whytock, 


Middle- 



26. Officials: Lee, DiRenzo. 



ton. 



- - HAY RIDE PARTIES - - 



DANCING, TOO 



OLD SAND FARM 

DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 



Hates 




Student 



Vol. XC, No. 14 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



By Subscription 



Faculty Sets 2.0 For Unlimited Cuts: 
Starr Reigns As f 64 Carnival Queen 

AcademicObligationNow 
A Student Responsibility 



Dance, Concert, Trip 
Highlight Week-end 

A slim, trim and cute twenty- 
one year old senior from Man- 
chester, New Hampshire reigned 
over the Bates College Win- 
ter Carnival this past weekend. 
Joanna Starr '64, elected by the 
men of the senior class as the 
fairest of their lot, was crowned 
Thursday evening on the steps 
of Hathorn Hall by John B. An- 
net, assistant to the President. 
The arrival of a torch, lit by Gov- 
ernor Reed and carried from 
Augusta by seven stalwart har- 
riers, officially opened the Carn- 
ival. Following the announcement 
and crowning of the Queen, she 
rode in a state-owned Jaguar 
XKE to the square dance in the 
Alumni Gymnasium, which was 
followed by an open house in 
Chase Hall. 

Friday Ski-Trip 

In an all day ski trip to King 

Pine Ski Area occupied Friday's 
activities. About 135 people en- 
joyed the area's facilities which 
included skiing, ice skating, to- 
bogganing. In the evening a din- 
ner was served to the students 
in the ski lodge. Students provid- 
ed the entertainment for the eve- 
ning after dinner. Marilyn Os- 
good '67, Robert Spear '65, and 
Mel Burrowes '66 formed a folk- 
singing trio. Later Marilyn, Rob- 
ert and Charles Love '66 sang 
solo. The skiers returned to cam- 
pus at 11:00. 

Saturday Ball 

An ice hockey game between 

the Hockey Club and anyone who' 
wanted to play was held Satur- 
day afternoon in the Central 
Maine Youth Center Rink. Two 
hundred people watched the 
Hockey Club defeat their oppon- 
ents. Ski movies were shown in 
the Little Theater after the 
game. A candle-light Carnival 
Banquet was served buffet style 
in the Men's Commons that eve- 
ning before the Crystal Ball. At 
8:00 the semi-formal Crystal Ball 
was held in the Alumni Gym- 
nasium. Ted Herbert and his 
Orchestra provided the music 
during the Ball, and Queen 
Joanna and her Court made 
their entrance mid-way through 
the ball. The girls of the Court 
danced with their fathers and the 
escorts danced with their 
mothers. Open House in the 
Women's Union followed the 
Crystal Ball. 

Sunday afternoon the much 
publicised Journeymen concert 
closed out the 1964 Winter Carn- 
ival. A review of this concert ap- 
pears on page three. 




Goldat Promotes Contest 
To Reward Student Art 



By GEORGE GOLDAT 

Somewhere or other — I can't 
remember precisely where — a 
recent best-seller carried some 
remark about prophets and the 
honors that often do not accrue to 
them. Well, interesting as that re- 
mark may be, there is no reason 
to live up to it, that is, to see that 
it always comes true. 

On the contrary, we might de- 
cide to test its converse — in fact 
that is just what we shall do.. We 
shall prophesize that not only will 
many turn out to see the results 
of the Student Art Competition, 



Recital Cancelled 

Professor D. Robert Smith is 
cancelling his spring recital pre- 
viously scheduled for Feb. 9, 
1964. Certain works intended for 
the recital may be performed at 
a later date. 



CALENDAR 



Wednesday, Feb. 5 
W.A.A. Meeting, W. Union, 
6:30-9 

Math Help Class, Libbey #1 

and 8, 7-9 p.m. 
Vespers, 9:30-10:00, Chapel 

Friday, Feb. 7 

Directing Class — Demonstra- 
tion 

Workshop, Little Theater, 7-9 
Basketball at Coast Guard 

Saturday, Feb. 8 
Basketball at WPI 
Track at Bowdoin 

Sunday, Feb. 9 
OC. Ski Trip 



but that there will be results to 
be seen. In other words, Bates' 
Bettys and Bobs shall take up 
the challenge and handle it in 
their inimitable way. 

What? 

Now, it just occurred to me 
that some of my readers may still 
not know what this is all about 
and so for those who find this 
direct and straightforward style 
a little disconcerting, I shall at- 
tempt to state in as clear (if not 
distinguished) a manner as is 
possible what this is all about. 

Student Artists 

What is this all about? (Third 
time and it must be answered!) 
Yes, here it is. There is at present 
a Student Art Competition in 
which all, who are or have re- 
cently created some painting, 
sculpture, etc., are invited to sub- 
mit an example of their work. 
Each artist may submit no 
more than one work in any one 
media, he may however submit 
a number of works in different 
media. 

The place to bring it is Hath- 
orn Hall 108. The 15th of Febru- 
ary is the deadline, because on 
the 16th the panel of judges shall 
decide on the First Prize and the 
two Honorable Mentions. These 
three will then — i.e., on Mon- 
day, 17th of February — be ex- 
hibited in the Treat Gallery while 
the Hartkin Show is there. In 
addition the creator of the First 
Prize will receive monetary re- 
muneration (about $25). 

The judges for this event are 
Mrs. John Tagliabue, Mr. Eliot 
Bates and Mr. Philip Isaacson. 



With the opening of the second semester, Bates students 
welcqmed the announcement of a revision in the cut system. 
A recent faculty decision lowered the QPR requirement for 
unlimited cuts from 2.800 to 2.000. 

The faculty action represents* 
the second major change in the 



cut system over the past five 
years. In 1960, the previous re- 
quirement of 3.200 was lowered to 
2.800, thereby including approxi- 
mately one-third of the student 
body. The present revision en- 
ables a large majority of students 
to exercise discretion in class at- 
tendance. 

A Privilege 

Dean Healy, explaining the 
faculty decision, expresses the be- 
lief that "the proper place to put 
academic obligation is on the stu- 
dent." He feels that there is a 
general conviction, on the part of 
the faculty, in favor of allowing 
each student to develop a sense 
of personal responsibility. Any 
student in good academic stand- 
ing, determined by a QPR of 
2.000 or better, has earned this 
privilege. 

An informal investigation of the 
(approximately) 300 students 
with unlimited cuts was conduct- 
ed in the spring of 1963. The re- 
sults indicated that the average 
number of cuts taken was not 



significantly higher for those 
with unlimited cuts than for those 
with a prescribed allotment of 
cuts per course. 

Below 2.0 — No Cuts 

Aside from the lowering of the 
QPR standard for unlimited cuts, 
the cut system remains largely 
unchanged. Students with QPR's 
of less than 2.000 lose all cut 
privileges. A warning continues 
to revoke cuts for the course in 
which the warning was received. 
There will still be no-cut days 
before and after each vacation. 

The public cut book, available 
to all students, will be decreased 
to register cuts only for those stu- 
dents without cut privileges and 
for such activities as Chapel and 
Physical Education in which at- 
tendance requirements are unal- 
tered. The faculty has not yet de- 
cided on a definite cut provision 
for first semester freshmen. 

Dean Healy stresses that the 
present revision is not necessarily 
final. Now, as in the past, the cut 
system is under close surveillance 
and is subject to change. 



Debaters Break Even At 
Harvard College Tourney 



Robert Ahem "64 and Max 
Steinheimer '66 represented Bates 
at the Harvard Invitational Tour- 
nament at Harvard College last 
weekend. One hundred sixteen 
schools participated in the tourna- 
ment, the largest and one of the 
most important in the country. 

ChapelChoirRecords 
For E-TV Network 

The Chapel Choir travelled to- 
day to Portland to make a record- 
ing for National Educational Tel- 
evision. They will record Ben- 
jamin Britten's "A Ceremony of 
Carols" on video tape. This pro- 
gram is the same one performed 
as a part of the Christmas pro- 
gram last December 12. 

Professor D. Robert Smith is 
director of the choir. Mrs. Al- 
fred Wright is accompanist. Sol- 
oists are Sandra Root Cook '65, 
Marilyn Osgood '67, and David 
Fulenwider '66. 

This recording will be avail- 
able on a record to be released 
around Commencement. 



The tournament featured eight 
preliminary debates on Friday 
and Saturday, with the two man 
teams "switching sides" (debat- 
ing first the affirmative and then 
the negative side of the proposi- 
tion). On the basis of these pre- 
liminary debates teams with a re- 
cord of six and two qualified for 
the quarter finals. Ahem and 
Steinheimer, with a record of four 
won and four lost, did not qualify 
for the quarter-finals They lost 
to: Loyola (Baltimore), Univer- 
sity of Virginia, Fort Hayes Kan- 
sas State Teachers College and 
St. Anselms. They defeated Ford- 
ham University, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, Clark College (Atlanta, 
Georgia) and Ripon College Wis- 
consin. 

During the month of February, 
two teams from Bates will attend 
three major tournaments. John 
Strassburger '64 and Sue Stanley 
'64, Tom Hall '64 and Robert 
Ahem '64 will participate in the 
Dartmouth Invitational Tourna- 
ment, The New England Invita- 
tionals at Emerson College and 
the MIT Tournament. 



TWO 



BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



Government Scripts 



Meeting called to order at 5:33 
in Costello Room, January 17, 
1964. 

Absentees: Henderson 

Guests: Downing, Soltis, Win- 
Balance of old Stu-C: 
Transferred to Senate: 
Bursar's Dues Collection Fee: 
Xmas Expense Fund for 

Foreign Student 
Income from 1st Sen. Dues: 



Totals — Dec. 31, 1963: 

Balance — Dec. 31, 1963: 

T.V. Fund in Savings Account: ' 

TOTAL: 

Cash Balance Jan. '64: 

MIRROR Add: 

Mimeo of Minutes 

Broken Windows & Campus Lights: 

Totals to date 
Balance to Date: 
Balance to Date: 
T.V. Fund: 
TOTAL: 



ter, Gomes, Marsden, Powers. Mr. 
Steele. 

Williams gave Treasurer's re- 
port, having finally gotten a full 
and complete statement from Mrs. 
Campbell: 



$77.53 
2.50 

11.00 



$93.03 



$177.53 



126.12 

$303.61 
$208.62 
$100.00 
$308.62 
$208.62 



$20.00 

1.75 
9.97 

$31.72 



$208.62 
$176.90 
$17.90 
100.00 
$276.90 



Williams reported that ex- 
penses for broken windows (See 
Dean's doodlings: Jan. 16) were 
charged to Council. It was agreed 
that this is a stupid waste of the 
men's money which a little self- 
control might end. Ten dollars ex- 
pense during the winter month's 
adds up over the winter. In de- 
tail, the bill was: 

Libby: 3 panes of glass $ .60 

Library: 1 3.45 

Pettigrew: 1 20 

Page: 1 .20 
Chase House: 

1 1.27 

1 1.55 
Campus Lamp Posts: 

6 panes of glass 2.70 



Total 



$9.97 



Williams asked about the con- 
dition of the Television. Boyd, 
and Quintal agreed that it could 
be improved, and will recom- 
mend action if necessary at the 
next meeting. Student opinions 
are welcome. 

Boyd and Quintal asked for 
improvement in pool equipment. 
Quintal will check on conditions 
and return with requests for any 
necessary new equipment next 
week. Again, opinions of the men 
are welcomed. 

Discuss Hazing 

Sherman then opened the dis- 
cussion of hazing and haze day. 
(The following is the essence of 
the discussion — an hour and a 
half in length and terribly com- 
plicated: DAW) 

Edwards, Chairman of Fresh- 
man Rules Committee read a re- 
port of the problems involved, 
and gave these suggestions as 
conclusions: 1) Revision is neces- 
sary. 2) Informal poll shows that 
most men favor keeping hazing. 

Noseworthy asked that Big 
Brother program be changed with 
the goal of making the relation- 
ship have some real meaning. 
Sherman, agreeing with Nosewor- 
thy, brought up the possibility of 
a joint de-bibbing and de-cap- 
ping ceremony. 



Strassburger asked why we 
couldn't return to the old system 
of having Big Brothers assigned 
by dorms and not by hometowns. 

R. Powers, Freshmen Class 
President, spoke on his classes' 
feeling about hazing. He said that 
most wished it to continue, with 
the only change in the direction 
of cooperation between classes 
instead of animosity. 

Strassburger suggested hazing 
be aimed at concentrating on 
dorm induction. Noseworthy 
agreed and suggested party ap- 
proach would help. Williams sug- 
gested that putting Big Brothers 
in the same dorm with their 
Little Brothers would help. 

Consider Goals 

Boyd suggested that the goals 
of hazing were to develop class 
unity and to create a sense of 
acceptence of the frosh. 

Williams suggested our think- 
ing include Freshmen Week 
plans. Hillier and Edwards gave 
suggestions for more integration. 

Alice Winter, President of 
Women's Council, reported on the 
women's plans which will be 
voted upon early in February. 
These rules suggest greater at- 
tention to sports and parties, with 
less dorm hazing activity. How- 
ever she reported some opposition 
to these suggestions; opposition 
which was strange in light of 
opinions always expressed by 
scared frosh and exhausted 
sophomores during hazing it- 
self. 

Williams suggested that the 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Lunt 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 




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50 Ash Street, Lewiston Opposite Post Office 

PAPERBACKS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF PAPERBACKS 
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Barnes & Noble College Outline Series 

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Book Dept. open 8:30 a.m.- 10 p.m.; Sundays to 9:30 p.m. 
First Floor open 5:30 a. m.-lO p. m.; Sundays to 9:30 p. m. 

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WCBB Features 



Tonight 

7:30 REPERTOIRE WORKSHOP 

— "Revue a la Carte". 
Eight young professional 
Chicago area performers 
star in this special musical 
show. 

8:30 BRIDGE WITH JEAN COX 

— The first lesson in a new 
series of intermediate bridge 
lessons. 

Den was responsible for an infu- 
sion of mob psychology into the 
Haze Day proceedings. 

Discussion pointed out that a 
vote of all the men would be 
necessary on any plans, and Boyd 
asked that the desires of a single 
class be put aside in an attempt 
to get the best hazing plan for all 
concerned. 

Create Committee 

Gomes suggested a joint com- 
mittee of men and women to 
work on the problem. 

Donovan made a suggestion 
that haze day be changed to out- 
door activities on the football 
field on a Saturday afternoon of 
an away football game. Skits, as- 
signments, etc. could be held. Wil- 
liams suggested that the Twin- 
Cities Barbeque, with the money 
we would have spent for a meal 
in commons, could provide a bar- 
beque dinner for the whole 
school. Donovan said a dance 
could follow. 

With this idea to go on, the 
Council voted to have a commit- 
tee work on it further. Edwards., 
Williams, Noseworthy, and Dono- 
van will be the committee, and 
look for suggestions from the 
men. 



9:00 JAZZ CASUAL — "The 
Gerry Mulligan Quartet^" 
Gerry Mulligan, important 
jazz figure of the present 
day, discusses jazz and per- 
forms several selections 
with the quartet. 

Tomorrow Night 

7:30 ABOUT PEOPLE — Dr. 

Maria Piers explains the 
process of psychoanalysis as 
a patient is seen attending 
analytic sessions. 

8:00 SCIENCE REPORTER — 
John Fitch takes viewers to 
the bio-medical cyclotron at 
Harvard University. 

8:00 FAR EASTERN ART — 
"Buddhism". Dr. Graeffe il- 
lustrates his explanations 
with examples from his art 
collection. 

9:00 THE OPEN MIND — "The 
Emancipat.ed Woman" 
Weekly round-table discus- 
sion. 

Friday Night 

7:00 ASTRONOMY FOR YOU — 

"The Sun". A study of the 
controlling body of the so- 
lar system. 
7:30 SOCIAL CONTROL AND 
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR — 
Colby credit course for 
teachers explores the con- 
temporary perspective of 
crime. 

8:00 N.E.T. DRAMA FESTIVAL 

— "MacBeth". William Dev- 
lin and Mary Morri play the 
leading roles in this inti- 
mate protrayal of a man 
who assassinates his king to 
satisfy his own ambitions. 



THE HERITAGE 

October 29, 1963 

Written apropos a discussion — or rather, a series of skirmishes 
concerning Maine— which terminated in the Bobcat Den at 10:45 
AM. in a verbal, rather than a physical victory. 

It snowed last night 

Covering the earth, once warm 

With a whiteness cold as death. 

And, since it never snows 

In "God's Country" — eighty mile south 

I had to take the brunt of punishment 

Of word and deed because I was 

Born here and think better than complain. 

Damn them, Mother Nature! 

Give them a warm and carefree clime 

To degenerate in. 

While here, like our forefathers, 

We two propagate the fittest — 

The happiest. The "Thick Skinned." 

The farmers — the noncomplaining few 

Who will carry on man's Seed 

During the next Ice Age. 

Frank H. Jewett '66 



D eW I T T 
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40 Pine Street 
Catering to 
INDIVIDUAL AND 
GROUP PARTIES 
Sunday and Holiday Dinners 
A Gormet's Delight 



ROLLINS 
Office Supply Co., Inc. 
Office Furniture & Supplies 
249 Main St.. Lewiston. Maine 
Phone 782-0141 



Guidance 

INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS 
WEDNESDAY: 5 February 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF 
BOSTON (Men & Women) Inter- 
viewer: Mr. Leon F. Beaulieu 

GREAT NORTHERN PAPER 
CO. (Men) Interviewer: Mr. John 
Rogers 

THURSDAY: 6 February 

HOFFMAN-LA ROCHE INC. 
(Pharmaceuticals, chemicals) 
(Men) Interviewer: Mr. John 
Strangio v 

SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. 
(Men) Interviewer: Mr. James 
Richardson. Group Meeting Rep- 
resentative: Mr. C. O. Cressy. 
Group Meeting — 4 P.M. WED- 
NESDAY, 5 February 
FRIDAY: 7 February 

BOSTON GAS CO. (Men) In- 
terviewer: Mr. Lawrence Tang- 
vik. 

U. S. NAVAL ORDINANCE 
LABORATORY (Men) Inter- 
viewer: Mr. E. V. Schuman. 
MONDAY: 10 February 

BAKER AND ADAM (Account- 
ants and Auditors) (Men) Inter- 
viewer: Mr. Robert L. Adam. 

UNION MUTUAL INSUR- 
ANCE CO. (Men) Interviewer: 
Mr. David G. Stanley. 
TUESDAY: 11 February 

JOHN HANCOCK INSUR- 
ANCE CO. (Men) Interviewer: 
Mr. Ronald Parheau. 

PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO. 
Interviewer: Mr. F. E. Burnett. 
WEDNESDAY: 12 February 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSI- 
NESS (Men) Interviewer: Mr. 
Donald A. Pease 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
NORTH AMERICA (Men) Inter- 
viewer: Mr. Barclay T. Macon. 

STANDARD & POOR'S COR- 
PORATION (Investments) Inter- 
viewer: Mr. Roger C. Schmutz 
'54. 

THURSDAY: 13 February 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
MACHINES CORPORATION 
(Men & Women) Interviewer: 
Mr. Herbert Seymour. Group 
Meeting — 4 P.M. WEDNESDAY, 
12 February. 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME & 
CO. (Men) Interviewer: Mr. Les- 
ter C. Gee. 

FRIDAY: 14 February 

CONNECTICUT MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO. (Men) 
Interviewer: Mr. Richard M. 
Boyd. 

MERCANTILE STORES COM- 
PANY, INC. (Men) Interviewer: 
Mr. Frank J. 'Magennis. 

All interested students should 

sign up immediately at the Place- 
ment Office for interview ap- 
pointments. 



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BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



97 
THREE 



Journeymen Review 



Last Sunday, for perhaps the 
first time in college history, "big- 
name" entertainment came to 
Bates. For the final program of 
Winter Carnival the students 
were offered folk-music, an off- 
ering, however, that they re- 
jected. Instead came the Jour- 
neymen, replete with smooth 
songs, smooth patter, smooth off- 
color jokes and a very smooth 
fee. What they gave in return 
for this last was — entertainment, 
good entertainment, smooth en- 
tertainment. 

For two hours (less a half-hour 
intermission) they regaled the 
audience with songs made famous 
by other groups. This is not to 
say that their range of songs was 
limited. " On the contrary their 
taste was remarkable for its cath- 
olicity. They sang Kingston Trio 
songs, Peter, Paul and Mary 
songs, Terriers songs, Joan Baez 
songs, hardly a group escaped 



their attention. They even sang 
songs they wrote themselves so 
as not to discriminate against 
anybody. 

All this is not to say that the 
Journeymen are bad, they aren't. 
What it is to say is that they are 
practitioners of an art I consider 
trivial and unimportant, the art 
of commercialism in folk-music. 

Folk-singers today are split 
basically into two general fac- 
tions, purists and commercialists. 
The purists accuse the commer- 
cialists of inauthenticity, of per- 
verting their material. The com- 
mercialists, in return just smile 
and wave their bankbooks at the 
purists. They don't have to say 
anything because they're making 
all the money. 

The above picture, although 
bounded by the limitations to 
which any generalization is sub- 
ject, is fairly accurate. Now comes 
the problem of deciding which 




answer — 



Hathorn Hall 



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Kim Novak 
James Garner 
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Sat. from 1 p.m. 
Sun. from 3 p. m 



group is right. The 
neither entirely. 

Authenticity for its own sake 
is as bad as the blandness that 
commercialism suffers from. 

What is at issue here is the 
reason or reasons why folk- 
music, or indeed any of the 
"arts", is performed. In effect, 
the question then becomes, why 
does someone sing? The answer? 
To communicate something, a 
mood, an idea, a story, a feeling. 
To be an effective mode of com- 
munication the song must be en- 
tertaining, but entertainment 
must be of secondary import- 
ance otherwise the value of the 
song is lost. It becomes merely 
a pretty thing, once heard and 
easily forgotten. It will haunt the 
attentive listener, run through 
his head, make a difference to 
him. How soon forgotten. 

None of the songs the Journey- 
men sang Sunday did this, and 
this is the complaint I have 
against them. They sang songs 
that were pretty, well played, 
smoothly sung and devoid of any 
feeling. Their lyrics could have 
been telephone numbers and 
the effect would not have been 
substantially changed. I have 
seen a song like "Cocaine" bring 
tears to an audience's eyes. In 
the hands of the Journeymen it 
became a nice song, an amusing 
song, and completely ineffective. 
Even the simplicity and inti- 
macy of the blues failed to force 
them to portray any sort of per- 
sonal involvement with what 
they sang. They seemed, through- 
out the program to have no real 
conception of what they were 
singing about. The spiritual they 
sang, "Swing Down Chariot" had 
a detachment that made it hard 
to dispel the impression that 
here were three nice boys sing- 
ing the songs their slaves used 
to sing. 

In the final analysis the Journ- 
eymen were nice, but when you 
think that for the same price, 
we could have had either Bob 
Dylan or Ian and Sylvia, it 
seems a shame to have wasted 
the money on something so tri- 
vial. Perhaps next year. . . 




Coram Library 



SOUTH OF PARIS 




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Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 

"THE GIANT" 

ELIZABETH TAYLOR 
ROCK HUDSON 

Sun. — Mon. — Tues. 

"MARY, MARY 

DEBBIE REYNOLDS 

STEEL CLAW 



BY PETER REICH 

There is a great deal to be said 
for the student RESTAUS in 
Grenoble. Even if they are over- 
crowded, cramped, and not al- 
ways clean, they provide the hun- 
gry student with food and often, 
surprises. Just the other day, I 
remarked to a friend r.bout a very 
tastty grey shredded parsley on 
the potatoes. The grey parsley 
turned out to be cigarette ashes. 

Like Grandma's 

Word has it that the table wine 
which can be bought in the RES- 
TAUS is cheap (30 cents a litre) 
because the workers who run up 
and down in the kegs squashing 
the grapes into wine have no 
bones about relieving themselves 
then and there-in if the necessity 
presents itself. You just don't 
think about things like that. 
Experience is the best teacher. 
For example, experience has 
taught me never to take any meat 
dish unless I can see what I'm get- 
ting. The French chefs in the 
RESTAUS have a great recipe for 
gravy. They can make the thick- 
est, most delicious-looking gravy 
you've ever set eyes on: thick and 
dark with carrots and onions 
floating around — just like mom 
used to make. This gravy comes 
in very handy for hiding choice 
bits of left-over gristle and bone. 
It is rather like a colourful muu- 
muu — you can put it over any- 
thing. 

As I recall, we had steak three 
times last year in Commons. 
Here, we get it two, often three 
times a week. If you are lucky, 
it is tender, and if you are luck- 
ier, it is cooked. Despite these 



— Closed Wednesdays — 



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Clark's Drug Store 

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Main ,St. at Bates St. 
Tel. 783-2011 




drawbacks, BIFTECK AUX FRI- 
TES is probably the most popular 
dish among the students. Yes- 
terday, after having had a choice 
cut myself, I asked a friend how 
he found his steak: "under a 
frite," he said starchily. 

I believe I mentioned in an ear- 
lier column the YAOURT- 
YAHOO SYNDROME, which oc- 
curs when English speaking stu- 
dents are confronted with the 
french "R". The problem is ex- 
pecially serious after dipthongs 
such as in the word YAOURT, the 
result being YAHOO (thus the 
name YAOURT-YAHOO SYN- 
DROME). Most of us have been 
here almost four months and 
have pretty well mastered the 
problem: 

The trick is to very casually 
say YAH— OOO, and then very 
quickly, without any warning, let 
your throat sneak up behind your 
tongue, grab the R and swallow 
like a madman — without swal- 
lowing your tongue. 



THE 

"HOBB" 

* * * 

LAUNDRY 
SERVICE 
OF ALL 
TYPES 



11:00 iLM. to 8:00 AJL 



PINELAND 
MOTEL 

Phones in Rooms 
■ Free TV - 

Located on U.S. 202 
2 Miles North of Maine 
Turnpike Exit 12 

Washington St. 
Auburn, Maine 
Dial 783-2044 



HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

DIAMONDS 

Members American Gem Society 
CASH - CHARGE - BUDGET 



JEWELER 



73 Lisbon St. 



Lewiston 



n 

FOUR 



BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



Editorials 

| Classroom Capitalism 

The faculty decision to grant discretionary cut privileges to all 
students in good academic standing is the most refreshing news 
we have reported since the hours of Coram Library were extended. 
Not only in that students will be free to cut if they choose to do 
so, but also in what this faculty decision requires, will it have a 
salutory effect. 

According to Dean Healy there is a general conviction on the part 
of the faculty that academic obligation should fall upon the stu- 
dent. Students must assume personal responsibility for attending 
class, since they are no longer required to attend. 

Yet, the faculty too will be faced with an academic obligation. 
Responsible preparation will fall upon all faculty members. 

The content of specific classes will have to improve or in the 
words of one faculty member "there are going to be a lot of empty 
classrooms this semester." Either greater stress will be laid upon 
student participation or the instructor's lecture will have to be 
more than repetition of the text. 

No longer will any faculty members be able to rely upon guar- 
anteed audiences. Either the class is worthwhile or students will not 
attend. 

With this decision, artificial attendance requirements have been 
removed. Eorced consumption has been vitiated. Student sovereign- 
ity reigns. And the laws of supply and demand have been intro- 
duced into the class room. Hopefully, the price will not be too high. 

Attention, Bates Men 

The following notice appears at the top of the stairs leading 
from the mail boxes to Commons: 

"The Student Council wishes to call your attention to the daily 
pile- up of jackets and books on the floor and stairs about the meal 
line in Chase Hall. This practice is not only hard on the jackets 
and books, but also creates a poor impression on visitors to the col 
lege and is generally unacceptable behavior. 

"Students are hereby advised that, after October 10, 1962, those 
coats, jackets and books not properly placed on the hooks and 
shelves provided, will be collected and deposited in a common box 
in lower Chase Hall. You can help yourselves and us by co-operat- 
ing with us in this measure." 

Within the next ten days, representatives from seventeen com- 
panies will be interviewing prospective job applicants in Chase Hall 
And throughout this semester not only business representatives, 
but guests and visitors from many places will be visiting the school 
in celebration of our one hundredth anniversary. 

The Student Council has been replaced by the Men's Council, 
but the enforcement of^ the above notice has been discontinued. 
Presently, jackets and books are a common sight not only at meal 
time, but throughout the day, on the stairs and floors of Chase 
Hall. 

The Men's Council could decide to ignore this situation and re- 
move the above notice. Or they could agree to abide by the Student 
Council's decision and undertake to enforce it. 

Yet, regardless of what the Men's Council decides, it will be the 
co-operation or lack of co-operation of the men, which will deter 
mine the success or failure of this measure. 

If only in light of the fact that the future employment of many 
of their fellow students depends greatly upon the impression which 
interviewers receive, all men should make a personal decision to co 
operate with the Men's Council in their attempt to alleviate this 
unsightly condition. 

It will, of course, be up to the Council to enforce this measure, 
for if anything is obvious in college, it is that student actions fall 
woefully short of their intentions. 



'hates 




Student 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Norman Gillespie '64 Margery Wilson '64 

Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor 

Peter d'Errico '65 
Feature Editor 

Steve Adams '65 News Editor 

Nick Basbanes '65 Sports Editor 

Robert Lanz '65 Business Manager 

Alan Cruickshank '65 Advertising Manager 

Alan Hartwell '66 Photographer 

John Bart '64 Editorial Assistant 

Pamela Ball '64 Editorial Assistant 

SaDy M. Smyth '65 Secretary 

Staff: Nancy Lester '64, Carol Johnson '64, Janet McEachern '66 
Judy Marden '66, Sue Lord '66, Anne Ganley '66, Rebecca Nally 
'66, Peter Beekman '67, Ken Burgess '67, Carla Swanson '67, Kathy 
Southhall '67. 

Mr. David A. Nelson 
Faculty Adviser 
Address all correspondence to Bates College, Box 309, 

or call 783-6661. 



Published weekly at Parker Hall, Bates College, during the college year. Tel 
783-6601. Printed at Auburji Free Press, 96 Court Street, Auburn, Maine, 
Entered as second-class matter at the Lewlston Post Office Jan. 30, 1913* 
under the act of Mar. 3, 1879. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 



etters To The Editor 



The following is the first part 
of a very long letter from, Robert 
Viles '61. The rest of his com- 
ments will be published in suc- 
cessive issues of the STUDENT. 

In his words, "the letter repre- 
sents a month or more of reflec- 
tion and writing on my part." __ 
During his senior year, Viles 
was President of the Student 
Council, predecessor of the pres- 
ent Men's Council. Ed _ _ 



To the Editor: 

It is a duty of those of us who 
have recently graduated from 
Bates to report our feelings on 
matters which concern the educa- 
tion of Bates students because 
not only among alumni do we 
have our on-campus experiences 
freshest in mind, but we are the 
ones who are currently experi- 
encing the sensations of going 
from Bates College into the world 
for which it has endeavored to 
prepare us. 

As a student in the Root-Tilden 
Program at New York University 
School of Law working with — 
competing with — students from 
all parts of the country who will 
be leaders of my generation. I 
have had the opportunity in these 
brief two years since graduating 
from Bates to measure my under- 
graduate education. 

While it will take many years 
to assess the more subtle influ- 
ences of Bates, it takes little 
enough time in face of law school 
demands to evaluate the academic 
and social preparation offered by 
the College. 

This letter is prompted by ttie 
proposal of President Phillips 
that Bates change from a four 
year to a three year college. My 
most urgent concern does not lie 
with the conversion inasmuch as 
it merely requires a reorganiza- 
tion and compression of the cur- 
riculum to accomodate the new 
calendar; no innovation in the es- 
sence of the Bates education 
seems necessary. 

Yet it is a step so significant 
that it is sure to have indirect 
and unplanned effects on the kind 
and quality of academic training 
at the College. While I cannot 
predict what these effects might 
be, I think the proposal affords 
an appropriate occasion to dis- 
cuss another aspect of equal im- 
portance in the College's prepara- 
tion of its students. 

Since its founding a hundred 
years ago, Bates has suffered 
from two inherent disabilities 
First, largely because of its tra- 
dition of preparing "teachers and 
preachers," it has not been bless- 
ed with the financial support of 
affluent alumni and friends of 
the College which other institu 
tions enjoy. 

President Phillips deserves 
commendation for having been 
able to run the College on a com 
paratively small endowment and 
at the same time to elevate facul 
ty salaries and to vastly improve 
the physical plant during the 
eighteen years of his administra- 
tion. By periodic increases in tui- 
tion and other fees, the college 
apparently is holding its own in 
the battle against rising costs. 

The adoption of a three year 
plan at Bates whereby nearly 
one-third more students could be 
graduated each year would un- 
doubtedly allow a significant eas- 
ing of the close economic con- 
duct which the Bates administra- 
tion must now follow. Obviously, 
if some measure is not taken to 
improve the College's resources, 
the yearly balance will not re- 
main in the black in coming years 
in face of the unabating trend of 




increasing costs. 

Jumps in tuition cannot con- 
tinue indefinitely at the current 
rate, which far outstrips the 
more gradual improvement in fin- 
ancial resources of the parents of 
Bates students. 



To the Editor: 

I enjoyed reading Brian 
Moores' inspired letter in the 
December 11th issue commenting 
on my short note. I am glad that 
Brian has put the problem so 
maturely, but I wonder about a 
couple of words he used. First he 
draws a distinction between "in- 
tellectual liberty" and "intellec- 
tual license". Now, that's a right 
pretty twist of words, but I am 
not sure that I know what it 
means. 

Then he goes on to talk about 
self-discipline. I somehow get the 
feeling that self-discipline can 
only grow out of freedom — and 
as that is a secret word at Bates, 
I do not think that Brian's mature 
self-discipline is much more than 
a super-imposed shield. I agree 
with him that in a GOOD liberal 
arts education there is the ele- 
ment of self-discipline, but Bates 
is such a limiting experience that 
the discipline gained there is 
false. 

Bates is a tiny isolated little 
segment of our academic jungle. 
There is no contact with reality — 
consequently, no one gains any 
real discipline. Bates is an un- 
real world where one becomes 
disciplined because one has noth- 
ing else to do. 

I spent two years at Bates. That 
is not a "short time". I spent a 
great deal of time resisting Bates 
until I saw that it was pointless. 

I do not wish to carry on a de- 
bate about Bates in this news- 
paper. But I think it would be 
wrong for Brian to say, as he 
does that there is not any hope 
for students like myself at an- 
other institution. This is false. 
Since leaving Bates I have taken 
courses elsewhere (University of 
Connecticut, University of Wis- 
consin) and have enjoyed them 
very much. 

I have also talked to many stu- 
dents who have left Bates, and all 
of them are "much happier" in 
their present surroundings. 

If this year is not totally un- 
like the last two, many students 
are probably considering leaving 



Moore needed to be FORCED 
TO APPRECIATE Haydn, Hume 
and Tolstoy, as he says, but to 
now call that "intellectual dis- 
cipline" makes me wonder just 
how "mature" Brian really is, 
since "mature" seems to be his 
favorite word. 

Dean Healy, as reported in an 
early issue of the STUDENT, 
called education "the liberation 
of one's self". If you are consider- 
ing leaving Bates, please do so 
very seriously. Ask yourself are 
you being "liberated" at Bates? 

Perhaps Brian can discuss "the 
most general aspects of say, the 
philosophy of Hume, or the novels 
of Tolstoy, or the symphonies of 
Haydn," but if you want to know 
more than "general aspects" con- 
sider transferring. 

Dean Randall, also in an early 
issue, coined the neat little 
phrase, "maturity brings secur- 
ity," but if maturity, funny how 
this word keeps popping up, 
means acquiesence and accept- 
ance, then it is simply a euphe- 
m i s m for conformity. Brian 
Moore "admired" the faculty de- 
cision on the November colloquia. 
This is your Bates "intellectually 
mature individual" — consider 
him carefully. Malcolm Mills 



To the Editor: 

Following the Bowdoin defeat 
at the hands of the Bates' bas- 
ketball team on Jan. 15, I was 
forced to drown my sorrows at 
The Villa. It was not the loss of 
the games that bothered my con- 
science, as much as the fact that 
my four years on this fair Bruns- 
wick campus have been spent in 
complete disillusionment. 

In the past, I have felt it my 
personal duty to apologize for the 
conduct of Bowdoin fans at many 
of our athletic events. Never 
again will this be done! My pre- 
vious image of Bowdoin has been 
shattered (don't worry, recovery 
is imminent) : we do not have the 
majority of animals present in 
the state of Maine. 

In the conduct of the Bates' 
fans, I observed persons who pos- 
sessed great potential in the field 
of "outanimalling" even the most 
proficient of our own animals. 

Congratulations on a fine dis- 
play of dispicable sportsmanship. 
You succeeded beyond my wildest 
expectations. William J. Kaschub 



BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



9? 
FIVE 



JB-WP Score 5-0 Win 

In Carnival Hockey 



By PETE HABERLAND 

On Saturday, an enthausiastic 
crowd of about 100 watched the 
athletic highlights of Winter 
Carnival Weekend at St. Dom's 
Arena. The annual interdorm 
hockey game provided an hour of 
fast and exciting entertainment, 
as it was won by the Parker-JB 
team in a one-sided contest; 5-0. 

The play was dominated by the 
1-2 scoring duo of George Beebe 
(2 goals, 3 assists) and Paul 
Bertocci (3 goals). The hard- 
pressed team from Smith and 
Roger Bill had its hands full in 
trying to stop these two. Beebe, 
with his speed and brilliant stick- 
handling skated roughshod 
through the defense of the losers. 
Solid Game 

Goalie Bill Graham played a 
solid game in the nets for the 
winners. Graham had a relatively 
easy afternoon as he had to stop 
only a few widely scattered shots 



of the opposition. 

Goalie Bill MacNevin played a 
spectacular game in the nets for 
the Smith-Roger Bill team. Mac- 
Nevin was constantly peppered 
with shots from the opening 
whistle on. As most of the action 
took place in his end of the ice, 
he saw the puck more than any 
other player. He was called upon 
to make many saves, some of 
them being quite spectacular. 
"Mac" deserved a well - earned 
round of applause for only letting 
5 of the shots go by him. 

The offense of the losers never 
really had an opportunity to get 
started. The tremendous fore- 
checking of the Parker-J.B. team 
kept the boys from Smiht-Roger 
Bill bottled up inside their own 
blue line for most of the game. 

All in all, it was an exciting, 
though lop-sided, contest. The 
boys from the Smith-Roger Bill 
team will be looking for revenge 
next year. 



0ll|p Jntramural £>rrn? 



This is the first, in a series of 
one, of impartial intramural re- 
porting. Before the final haul in 
the season begins there is still 
some unfinished business to take 
care of. In the last week before 
final exams there were only six 
games. The A league had only 
one tilt and it was a big one! The 
Middies rolled over the Off Cam- 
us Unit 61-45 O. C. looked like 
a million in baby blue but even 
the glamor of pretty shirts was 
not enough to match the shoot- 
ing of Ritter (20), Lanz (17), 
and Whittum (16). Agnos scored 
14 for the losers. 

Lots of Action 

B-I league was a little more 
active. It saw the boys from JB 
take the Faculty in a squeaker 
36-34. Grant "Gaylord" Farquhar 
was high with 12 tallies, while 
Sigler and Peck threw in 10 each 
for the losers. In other B-I action 
favored Smith North swamped 
the Roger Bill five 47-26. North 
put on a well balanced attack 
with freshman Bob Aaron lead- 
ing the field with 12 points. 

C-I league had only one game 
which saw Bill Shannon (three 
time C league all-star) play true 
to form and lead his SN team 
to a 33-30 victory over West. 
Shan's 15 was high for the game. 
In C-II WP beat SS 36-21 and 
SM collected a forfeit win from 
Roger Bill. 

OC Has A Winner 

Looking to the weeks ahead 
we can expect to see some ex- 
citing B-Ball, as all leagues are 
still pretty tight. Checking the 
front runners: (A) the Middies 
are fast but lack a bench, (B-I) 
North is strong but still needs to 
get organized. (B-II) O.C. looks 



invincible but its a long way to 
go and the Whale is getting old, 
(C-I) North looks tough, but then 
they have Shannon, and in C-II 
it is still a toss up between West 
and Middle. 

Leading Scorers: Art Agnos is 
leading intramural scorers at 
present with a seventeen point 
per game average. He is followed 
closely by JB's Bob Tompson and 
Middle's Bob Lanz, both averag- 
ing 16. 

Star of The Week 
Intramural man of the week: 
Steve Ritter. Tex led his Middle 
squad with 20 points and took 
everything but the paint off the 
boards as they rumbled into first 



place over OC. 




A LEAGUE 




MIDDLE 


2-0 


JB 


1-1 


OC 


1-1 


WILLIAMS 


0-1 


WEST 


0-1 


C-ll LEAGUE 




WEST 


2-0 


MIDDLE 


2-0 


EAST 


1-1 


SOUTH 


0-2 


WILLIAMS 


0-2 


B-I LEAGUE 




NORTH 


2-0 


JB 


1-0 


SOUTH 


0-1 


WILLIAMS 


0-2 


B-II LEAGUE 




OC 


2-0 


EAST 


1-1 


JB 


0-1 


WILLIAMS 


0-1 


C-l LEAGUE 




NORTH 


2-0 


JB 


1-1 


WEST 


1-1 


MIDDLE 


0-1 




0-1 



EVEN A SLIDE RULE . . . 



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fm» - J ,, 



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But a Depositors Trust Company Special Checking 

account will. 

When you pay all your bills with a Depositors Special 
Check, you know where your money goes. 



No minimum balance required! 
No maintenance or service 
charge! You pay for the checks 
and no more! 




Depositors 



Trust Company 

The Bank That is Busy Building Maine- 
mum D FEM»AlM«»^!ys°EM ORAT ' ON 




Bobcat Of The Week 



Carl Johannesen of Needham, 
Mass. emerges this week from a 
tightly-knit pack of fine perform- 
ers to capture Bobcat honors in 
games played before finals, and 
in the recent record setting Bran- 
deis game. 

In ail of these games the 6'4" 
junior economics major gave 
evidence of the fact that he has 
come around to give Bates vital 
strength beneath the boards. In 
both the New Hampshire and 




Basketball Box Scores 



Basketball Box Scores Week of 
Jan. 13. 



Wednesday, January 15 at 
Alumni Gym 



BATES (76) 


G 


F 


PTS. 


Beisswanger 


3 


2 


8 


Cummings 


7 


6 


20 


Johannesen 


5 


2 


12 


Beaudry 


5 


2 


12 


Krzynowek 


6 


2 


13 


Stevens 


0 


L 


1 


Gardiner 


0 


1 


1 


Hine 


0 


0 


0 


Johnson 


3 


0 


6 


Michlr 


1 


0 


2 


Totals 


30 


16 


76 


BOWDOIN (68) 


G 


F 


PTS. 


Silverman 


0 


0 


0 


Pease 


5 


4 


14 


Whitmore 


8 


3 


19 


Napolitano 


4 


2 


10 


Warren 


6 


1 


13 


Ingram 


3 


2 


8 


Harrington 


1 


2 


4 


Tolpin 


0 


0 


0 


Leishman 


0 


0 


0 


Schwadron 


0 


0 


0 


Totals 


27 


14 


68 


Halftime Score: 


Bates 


36, 


Bow- 



Maine games Ingo pulled in 
fifteen rebounds, and against 
Brandeis he got twenty-two. 

Standing 6 ft. 4 in. tall and 
weighing 220 pounds, Carl is the 
biggest man on the Bates first 
squad. Also not to be under-em- 
phasized in this tower of 
strength's achievements is his of- 
fensive ability, for there too, he 
scored a respectable total. 



+ + 
"HOTEL HOLLY" 

BEST ENTERTAINMENT 
IN MAINE 
Main Streel Lewiston 

+ + 

BEDARD'S 

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DRIVE-IN PHARMACY 
Phone 4-7521 Lewiston, Maine 
Cor. College and Sabaiius Sis. 



doin 30 

Officials: Crozier, Middleton. 



Thursday, January 16 at 
Alumni Gym 



BATES (96) 




G 


F 


PTS 


Beisswanger 




4 


3 


11 


Cummings 




5 


9 


19 


Johannesen 




5 


4 


14 


Beaudry 




7 


1 


15 


Krzynowek 




7 


2 


16 


Stevens 




0 


0 


0 


Gardiner 


3 


4 


10 


Hine 




0 


0 


0 


Johnson 




3 


0 


6 


Mischler 




0 


5 


5 


Heckman 




0 


0 


0 


Totals 




34 28 


96 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


(84) 










G 


F 


PTS 


Rich 




3 


3 


9 


Home 




8 


1 


17 


Mandrauelis 




4 


7 


15 


Fuller 




3 


0 


6 


Zyla 




5 


0 


10 


Ball 




2 


4 


8 


Daniels 




2 


3 


7 


Larkin 




3 


0 


6 


Drinon 




3 


0 


6 



Newton 


0 


0 


0 


Bongiovanni 


0 


0 


0 


Totals 


33 


18 


84 


Halftime Score: 


Bates 41, New 


Hampshire 38 








Officials: Gentile, Perry. 




Saturday, January 18 




at Orono 






BATES (48) 


G 


F 


PTS 


DclooWdllgcl 


4 


2 


10 


1^1 1TV* YVl mffo 

v. uniniiii{,.' 


A 
*± 


0 


8 




o 


3 


7 


Beaudry 


0 


0 


0 


Krzynowek 


3 


1 


7 


kj t v V CJi l o 


9 

40 


i 
i 


5 


Gardiner 


1 


0 


2 


Hine 


0 


1 


1 


Johnson 


1 


0 


2 


Mischler 


3 


0 


6 


Totals 


20 


8 


48 


MAINE (54) 


G 


F 


PTS 


Flahive 


4 


0 


8 


McKinnon 


0 


0 


0 


Vanidestine 


1 


1 


3 


McGonagle 


0 


0 


0 


Harnum 


2 


0 


4 


Spreng 


4 


0 


8 


Strang 


4 


0 


8 


Gillette 


5 


2 


12 


Svendsen 


3 


2 


8 


Brewer 


0 


0 


0 


Dunham 


1 


0 


2 


Woodbury 


0 


1 


1 




24 


6 


54 



Halftime Score: Maine 25, Bates 
23 

Officials: DiGravio, Busa 



FERN'S 
TAXI 



784-5469 



LOU'S PLACE 
Catering to Bates Students 

Enjoy Yourself Where the Gang 
Meets . . Regular Meals 
Served — Pizzas — Steaks — 
Sandwiches — Refreshments 
777 Main St. Lewiston 
Opp. the Mart 



First-Manufacturers 
National Bank 

of Lewiston and Auburn 

CONVENIENTLY 
LOCATED 

for Bates Students at 
456 SABATTUS ST. 

Member F. D. I. C. 



Norris - Hayden 
Laundry 



Modern Cleaners 



Campus Agent 
PAUL PLANCHON 
BILL MacNEVIN 



- - HAY RIDE PARTIES - - 



DANCING, TOO 



OLD SAND FARM 

DESERT ROAD FREEPORT 
Tel. 865-6004 or 865-4972 



* ■" ■ »» ■ ■'■» 

BUY WHERE MOST BATES PEOPLE DO . . . 

See SHEP LEE at 

ADVANCE AUTO SALES, INC. 

24 FRANKLIN STREET AUBURN. MAINE 

Dial 784-5775 or 782-2686 

VALIANT-PLYMOUTH CHRYSLER-IMPERIAL 
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— GUARANTEED USED CARS — 
Excellent Service on All Makes 
10% Discount on All Service Work to Bates-Affiliated People 



LeBLANC'S 
CLEANERS 

10 Lafayette Street 

Coin-Operated 
DRY CLEANING 
GIANT 12 lb LOAD 
- Pressing on Premises - 

5 Min. Walk from Campus 



)6 d 
SIX 



BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 5, 1964 



Cagers Squash Brandeis, 109 - 95 

Cummings High In Game That 
Breaks School Scoring Record 

By Don Delmore '64 

Thirteen fired up Bobcats made history Monday night with a 109-94 thumping of the 
highly regarded Brandeis judges. Despite a layoff of over two weeks, the 'Cats gave 
their finest performance of the season and recorded the highest point total in the annals 
of Bates College baesketball. A packed Alumni Gymnasium watched in amazement as 
the flawless play of the 'Cats continued for the entire forty minutes of action. The previ- 
ous record of 97 points had been set during the 1960-61 season in an away game with the 

University of New Hampshire. 

Early Explosion 




By NICK BASBANES 

In watching the ninth winter Olympics on television lately 
it's been very hard to feel really terrible about the dismal 
U.S. showing. Ordinarily, if we offered even a slight sem- 
blance of adequate competition, then losing would indeed be 
a tragedy. But there are just two classes of competitors at 
Innsbruck — the stars and the also rans. This just happens to 
be a year when our efforts must fall into the latter category. 

Of course a lot of variants must be recognized as placing 
the U.S. at a disadvantage. First of all, American athletes of 
the amateur status are usually their own sponsors. A good 
deal of their own time and money is needed to both train 
them and provide for them. In most of the other countries 
competing, the governments take an active part in supporting 
their amateurs— making them really not amateurs at all. 
Hence more of the athlete's time can be spent training, while 
the American is working. Another unfortunate factor is the 
fact that the cream of the American skating team was killed 
in a plane crash in France a few years ago. 

This is not to imply that we are being cheated or anything 
of the sort. The fact remains that we're entered in the Olym- 
pics and we're being squashd in what one of the television 
announcers termed as "the greatest American tragedy in 
international sports." Well I don't think things are as bad as 
all that. After all, Jean Saubert won two bronze medals for 
the U.S., the total American harvest of points thus far. And 
this is what should be applauded, the areas (though few and 
far between) that we do well in. Outside of that, we shouldn't 
express widespread woe over the fact that a national disaster 
has struck. We should complement our whole team, as well as 
the Russian girl Lidia Skoblikova, who has garnered an un- 
precedented four gold medals. And even then, things can't be 
all that bad if one considers that the poor Greeks started this 
whole thing a few thousand years ago, and now they aren't 
even entered. 

In view of the fact that the recent Bowdoin game came a 
few hours after my article on Bates crowds appeared, it 
should be necesary to point something out. I mentioned 
(rather briefly perhaps, but it was there) that crowds are 
great if they remain within the bounds of decency. If it be- 
comes necessary to remove some spectators from the game 
for indecent conduct, as happened at the Bowdoin game, then 
these people, though they be of our own flesh so to speak, 
can not be considered respective of the type of group I call 
admirable. 



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Brandeis brought a small 
fast-breaking unit whose 
style of play greatly resem- 
bled that of the Bobcats. Both 
squads matched baskets 
throughout most of the first 
half. It was only in the clos- 
ing minutes of first half ac- 
tion that the 'Cats exploded 
into a thirteen point lead. 

Bates opened in their fa- 
miliar zone prese, but the 
sharp passing Brandeis quin- 
tet had little trouble in cross- 
ing the ten second line. For- 
ward Stuart Paris hit four 
straight jump shots to keep 
the Judges in the game dur- 
ing the opening minutes of 
play. Sparked by the shoot- 
ing of Ted Krzynowlk and 
rebounding of Ingo Johannesen, 
Bill Beisswanger plus the rugged 
the Bobcat first unit opened a 
32-27 lead with 8:15 remaining in 
the first half. At this point Coach 
Peck inserted his second team 
to rest his starting five. Fred 
Stevens hit for two quick 
hoops and Dave Heckman 
added another, but the alert 
Judges narrowed the margin 

to 38-35 on a series of baskets 
by Steve Heller and Gary 
Goldberg. The first unit re- 
turned with 4:10 remaining 
and once again showed Bob- 
cat fans their truly explosive 
attack. Brandeis stayed with- 
in five points at 48-43 with 
slightly over one minute left. 
At this point a Krzynowlk 
lay-up, a jumper by Seth 
Cummings, and two more 
driving lay-ups by Beisswan- 
ger and Don Beaudry gave 
Bates a comfortable 56 - 43 



fantastic total of 109. 
Cummings Tops 

Once again Seth was high 
scorer with 24 points, fol- 
lowed by Beisswanger, 
Krzyuowlk, and Johannesen 
with 21, 19, and 18 points re- 
spectively. Ingo was again 
outstanding off the boards, 
gathering in 22 precious re- 
bounds. 



halftime lead. 
Cats Control 

The 'Cats continued to dom- 
inate second half play, open- 
ing leads of as many as nine- 
teen points. The outcome was 
no longer really in question 
but all those present realized 

that Bates had an excellent 
chance to go over one hun- 
dred points for the first time 
in history. Chants of "we 
want a hundred" began to 
echo throughout Alumni 
Gymnasium. 

A second straight sweeping 
hook shot by Cummings, fol- 
lowed by a Beaudry drive, 
opened the margin to 88-71 
with 6:10 remaining. Ingo 
scored following a sharp pass 
from Beaudry, and converted 
a foul shot to give Bates a 

total of 91 points. A Cum- 
mings drive and two more 
consecutive hoops by Johannesen 
tied the former Bobcat record of 
97 reached four years ago. Ingo 
broke the record on a lay-up 
with 3:15 remaining following an- 
other pretty pass from Beaudry .\ 
A jumper by Beisswanger from 
the foul line pushed the 'Cats 
over the century mark at 101- 
85 with 1:55 remaining. 

Coach Peck inserted his sec- 
ond unit at this point and saw 
the record run up to 109. The 
five hustling Bobcat starters 
received a well-deserved 
standing ovation upon being 
replaced. 

Senior Ted Beal tallied on a 
driving lay-up for the final Mike Hine 
hoop to set the record at the 1 Carl Johannesen 



BATES 


G 


F TP 


Cummings 


11 


2 24 


Beisswanger 


10 


1 21 


Johannesen 


7 


4 18 


Beaudry 


4 


0 8 


Krzynowek 


8 


3 19 


Gardiner 


0 


0 0 


Stevens 


3 


0 6 


Hine 


1 


0 2 


Heckman 


1 


0 2 


Mischler 


2 


2 6 


Wyman 


0 


0 0 


Beal 


1 


0 2 


Garfield 


0 


1 1 




48 


13 109 


BRANDEIS 


G 


F TP 


Paris 


9 


8 26 


Heller 


5 


2 12 


Cimino 


6 


0 12 


Smith 


8 


2 18 


Sukenick 


1 


0 2 


Goldberg 


6 


1 13 


Epstein 


4 


1 9 


Segal 


0 


0 0 


Leiderman 


1 


0 2 




40 


14 94 


Basketball statistics 






Floor Shooting Pet. 




Eill Gardiner 


8- 15 


.533 


Bob Mischler 


22- 52 


.423 


Seth Cummings 


77-184 


.419 



18- 45 

24- 61 



.400 
.394 




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PERSONALLY SUPERVISED PROGRAMS 
FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

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ASK ABOUT REDUCED RATES 
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results in 60 days — 
Lose 15 lbs. excess 
body- weight, lose 6|/ 2 " 
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Add V/ 2 " on each 
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/o/ 



Vol. XC, No. 15 



BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, MAINE, FEBRUARY 12, 1964 



Senate Suggests 
Amendments To 
Election System 

Students Vote Monday 



To simplify and clarify their 
electoral procedure the Student 
Senate has initiated a referendum 
to amend Article V of the Senate 
Constitution. 

Students will vote next Mon- 
day evening, in the dinner line, 
on the proposed changes. Sixty 
per cent of all students must 
favor the proposal for it to take 
effect. Failure to vote will con- 
stitute a veto against the amend- 
ments. 

The proposed amendments 
modify the procedure involved in 
both the election of senator and 
the selection of the President and 
Vice-President of the Senate. 
Class Representatives 

Section lb, part 3, has been 
amended to read: "Students vot- 
ing in the primaries will vote 
only for candidates of their own 
class and sex, (e.g. junior men 
will vote for junior men candi- 
dates, junior women will vote for 
junior women candidates)." 

What this simply means is 
that the electoral procedure al- 
ready in use for freshmen elec- 
tions will be continued in Spring 
elections. Each class will elect its 
representatives to the Senate — 
with the men still electing their 
representatives, and the women 
electing the female senators. 

Presidential Vote 

The other change is in Section 
2d which reads: "All registered 
students of Bates College may 
vote for the President and Vice 
President of the Senate. Each 
voter will cast two votes: one 
for a man and one for a woman. 
The voter will indicate his pref- 
erence for President by placing 
a "P" next to one of the two 
Senior senators for whom he has 
voted. The person receiving the 
highest number of "P" votes will 
be President. The person of the 
opposite sex from the President 
receiving the highest number of 
votes shall be Vice President." 
Students Vote For VP 

This amendment rectify's the 
present procedure which allows 
each student to vote only for 
President, with the Vice Presi- 
dent being the member of the 
opposite sex who receives the 
most votes for President. 

The new procedure will allow 
students to vote for both Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, as well 
as guarantee that the two officers 
will be of the opposite sex. 



Frosh Debate 

Tryouts for the annual Fresh- 
man Prize Debate will be held in 
Room 300, Pettigrew Hall at 7 
p.m. on Thursday, February 13th. 
Candidates are requested to de- 
liver an original five minute per- 
suasive speech on some phase of 
a controversaj topic. Speak from 
an outline and do not use a de- 
batp speech in case you have one! 

For further information see 
Professor Quimby or any mem- 
bers^ the varsity debate squad. 



By Subscription 




CA Sponsors Inquiry 
Into Values and Ideas 
Of Religious Attitude 



A scene from "Right You Are' 



Players Stage Pirandello's 
'Right You Are' Next Week 

The Robinson Players will to vary, 

present Luigi Pirandello's RIGHT The stage set itself plays an 

YOU ARE) on the evenings of important role in the presentation 

February 20, 21, 22 in the Little oi" Pirandello's "message". The 



Theater. 

The production is under the dir- 
ection of Miss Lavinia Scheaffer 
assisted by Sandra Prohl '64 and 
Peter Heyel '65. 

The play allows of no major/ 
minor distictions between charac- 
ters. The cast, in order of appear- 
ance is: John Holt '64 — Laudisi, 
Marcia Flynn '65 — Amalia, Nancy 
Dillman '64— Dina, Robert Arm- 
ington '66 — the Butler, Priscilla 
Clark '66— Signora Sirelli, Al 
Skogsberg '66 — Signor Sirelli, 
Carol Johnson '64 — Signora Cini, 
Royce Buehler '66 — Signor Cini, 
Ned Brooks '65 — Agazzi, Abbey 
Palmer '65— Signora Frola, Tod 
Lloyd '64 — Signor Ponza, Suz- 
zanne Johnson '67 — Signora Nen- 
ni, William Dye '66— Centuri, 
John David '64 — The Governor. 

Satire, Fable or Play? 

The play itself is indefinable. 
Not every one calls it a play; it 
has been known as a satire and as 
a fable. The interwoven and con- 
trasting elements of tragedy and 
comedy have led most critics to 
label the work as a tragicomedy. 

However, it may also be re- 
garded as a "whodunit" for it 
forcefully poses the questions 
"who is mad?" and "who is to 
blame?" 

The play has serious social 
meaning: It deals with the state 
of society in bourgeois Italy, but 
poses questions of social signific- 
ance for every viewer 

Ideas Not People 

Pirandello's use of the personal 
identity theme demands audience 
participation on an intellectual 
plane. Each member of the audi- 
ence should identify with ideas 
rather than people or personali- 
ties. Which idea to identify with 
is a decision left to the individual 
viewer and the choices are apt 

Journeymen 

Due to a printing error in last 
week's STUDENT, the byline on 
the Journeymen review was 
omitted The reviewer was Tod 
Lloyd '64. Ed. 



set consists of an unusual ar- 
rangement of doors, platforms, 
and chairs. The position of var- 
ious pieces of furniture is im- 
portant in that it gives the viewer 
a clue as to what has preceeed 
the scene being played. 

Miss Schaeffer and the Robin- 
son Players are hoping for a 
large student attendance, espec- 
ially due to the need for an in- 
tellectually responsive audience. 
Tickets will be on sale every eve- 
ning except Sundays from 7:30 
until 8:30 p.m. 



Today, tommorow, and Friday, 
the Christian Association is spon- 
soring Religious Emphasis Week, 
A Conference on Social Direc- 
tions. With "Directions" as its 
theme, Religious Emphasis Week 
will present through lectures and 
discussion groups contemporary 
ideas and attitudes in religion. An 
application of social values and 
directions is the primary em- 
phasis of the program. 

Featured speakers are Miss 
Ruth Elizabeth Johns who will 
speak Wednesday evening at 7: 00 

p.m. on "Honest to God", and 
Reverend Samuel Lucius Gandy 
who will speak tomorrow night at 
8:00 p.m. on "Message and Mis- 
sion: The Continuing Encounter". 
All talks will be given in the 
Chapel. 

Church of Christ 

Miss Ruth Elizabeth Johns of 
New York City is publications 
secretary of the Council for 
Christian Social Action of the 
United Church of Christ and edi- 
tor of its monthly magazine, 
SOCIAL ACTION. Miss Johns 
had served with the Young Wo- 
men's Christian Association for 19 
years before joining the staff on 
the United Church. Miss Johns is 
a graduate of Goucher College, 



OC Plans Weekly Skiing; 
Student Sign UpsOn Wed. 

The Hikes and Trips director- 
ship of the Outing Club announc- 
es that this season, for the first 
time, they plan to sponsor a ski 
trip every weekend to one of the 
various ski areas in Maine. Can- 
cellation of a trip would only re- 
sult from poor weather condi- 
tions, lack of a chaperone, or lack 
of student response. 



In the Hob 

Students are reminded that 
sign-ups are taken every Wed- 
nesday night in the Hob from 
9:00 until 10:00. A charge of only 
$2.00 is made to help defray 
transportation costs, which must 
be paid at the time of sign-ups. 

Sugarloaf, Saddleback and Mt. 
Abrams will be skied this year. 
The cost of two tickets is $4.50 a 
day at Sugarloaf and Mt. Abrams, 
with a special group rate of $3.00 
being offered by Saddleback for 
groups of 30 or more. 

Ski Cabin 

The Sugarloaf ski cabin will be 
open as many weekends as pos- 
sible, with students arranging 
their own transportation. A 
charge of $.50 a night is made 
per person to help pay the $250 
rental fee of the cabin. 

All ski trips will leave the 
front of Rand Hall at 6:30 a.m. 



with breakfast provided on the 
bus. A box lunch is provided at 
the ski area. (Hint: Anyone in- 
terested in making sandwiches is 
welcome at 12:30 on Saturday in 
the Common's kitchen.) When 
possible, the buses will return in 
time for supper. 

It is hoped that many students 
will take advantage of this op- 
portunity to ski every weekend. 
There is no limit to the number 
that may go. Classes and other 
organizations are reminded that 
they may Work in conjunction 
with the O.C. in promoting these 
trips. As soon as the snow melts, 
look forward to more hikes, 
mountain climbs, and canoe trips! 

Rob Players' Movie 

"All Quiet on the Western 
Front" will be shown this Sat- 
urday evening at 7 and 9 p.m. in 
The Little Theater. 

This film, adapted from the 
book of the same name, deals 
with the honor and treachery of 
The Great War. 

Actual scenes, filmed during 
WWI, have been incorporated in- 
to the film to add to its realistic 
flavor. 



Maryland, and has a Masters de- 
gree from Mt. Holyoke College. 

Samuel Lucius Gandy is Dean 
of Lawless Memorial Chapel and 
Professor of Religion at Dillard 
University, Lousiana. He was 
among the founders of the Na- 
tional Association of College and 
University Chaplains and is a 
past president of the Association. 
Member SCPA 

His campus ministry has in- 
cluded Fisk University and Vir- 
ginia State College. He is a mem- 
ber of the Southern College Per- 
sonnel Association and Chair- 
man of the Committee on Reli- 
gious Needs of Students. He has 
a PhD. from the University of 

Chicago in Philosophy, Religio:#, 
and Personality, 1952. 

From 1958-59 he served as a 
special Danforth Fellow at the 
University of Chicago's Divinity 
School. He was vice-president of 
the New Orleans Branch of the 
NAACP from 1957-61. Since 1961 
he has served as pastor for the 
Kenwood-Ellis Community 
Church in Chicago. 

This morning in Chapel, Rev- 
erend P. Lee Burns of St. Pat- 
ricks Church, Lewiston spoke on 
the "Ecumenical Council and its 
Spirit". At noon a luncheon meet- 
ing was held in Commons for all 
those who wished to attend. At 
4:00 p.m. in the Filene Room, 
Reverend Burns will hold a dis- 
cussion session during which time 
the students may air their views 
about religion. Following this dis- 
cussion session there will be a 
dinner meeting in Commons at 
5: 15 p.m. for those interested. 

Dr. Gandy Tomorrow 

Tomorrow, there will be a din- 
ner meeeting in Commons in the 
Costello Room at 6:30 p.m. again 
for interested students. A recep- 
tion and discussion hour from 
9-10 p.m. in the Women's Union 
will follow Dr. Gandy's talk. 

Rabbi Harry Z. Sky, Temple 
Beth El, Portland, is the Friday 
Chapel speaker. Rabbi Sky's talk 
is entitled "The Moral Emphasis" 
At noon there will be a luncheon 
meeting with Rabbi Sky in the 
Costello Room, Commons. 

Dean Borgman, faculty mem- 
ber of New York City Community 
College, is the evening speaker in 
the Chapel at 8:00 p.m. Following 
Mr Borgman's speech, a discus- 
sion hour and reception will be 
held in the Women's Union from 
9-10 p.m. 

During the Conference on So- 
cial Directions, the dinner and 
luncheon meetings are open to 
all. The public is cordially invited 
to attend all phases of the pro- 
gram. The emphasis is on in- 
formality and as much time as 
possible will be devoted 10 in 
formal discussions with the 
speakers. 



/o2l 

TWO 



— 



BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 12, 1964 



Guidance 

CAREER INTERVIEWS 

MONDAY: 17 February 

J. J. NEWBURY COMPANY 
(Men) Interviewer: Mr. T. R. 
Sutton 

NORTON COMPANY (Men) 
Interviewer: Mr. Richard L. 
Gremley. 

STATE MUTUAL LIFE IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY (Men) 
Interviewer: Mr. Carl A. Jacob- 
son. 

TUESDAY: 18 February 

ARMY MEDICAL SPECIA- 
LIST CORPS (Women — Sum- 
mer and Careers) Interviewer: 
Capt. Barbara A. Davis. 

A. C. LAWRENCE LEATHER 
COMPANY (Men) Interviewer: 
Mr. R. D. Cottam. 
WEDNESDAY: 19 February 

W. T. GRANT COMPANY 
(Men) Interviewer: Mr. Gor- 
don Anderson. 

(Men and Women) Interviewer: 
MUTUAL OF NEW YORK 

Mr. Douglas Gates. 

THURSDAY: 20 February 

CONNECTICUT GENERAL 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Men and Women) Interviewer: 

Mr. Kenneth C. Carson, Jr., and 

Miss Nancy Kennedy. 

WORCESTER TELEGRAM — 

THE EVENING GAZETTE 

(Men) Interviewer: Mr. Richard 

Lindi. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION (Men and Wo- 
men) Group Meeting luncheon: 
Interviews; Interviewers: Mr. 
Chester A. Baker and Mr. Paul 
Bernholdt '58. 
FRIDAY: 21 February 

NATIONAL SECURITY 
AGENCY (Men and Women) In- 
terviewer: Mr. John F. Sweeney. 

THE NATIONAL SHAWMUT 
BANK (Men) Interviewer: Mr. 
Henry Mountord. 

OXFORD PAPER COMPANY 
(Men) Interviewer: Mr. Ronald 
M. Reed. 

All interested Students should 
sign up for interview appoint- 
ments at the Guidance and 
Placement Office as soon as pos- 
sible. If interview time is avail- 
able underclassmen might sign 
up for interviews for summer 
employment. 

INTERVIEWS FOR TEACHING 
WEDNESDAY: 19 February 

DARIEN, CONNECTICUT (at 
1:00 P.M.) Representatives: Mr. 
Perschino, Mr. Forsberg. 
TUESDAY or WEDNESDAY: 25 
or 26 February 

MADISON, NEW JERSEY (9:00 
A.M.) Representative: Mr. Wil- 
liam Rogers. 

WEDNESDAY: 26 February 

SUFFIELD, CONNECTICUT 
(10:00 AM.) Representative: Mr. 
Hugh Watson, Supt. 

PORTLAND, CONNECTICUT 
(9:30 A.M.) Representative: Mr. 
Howard Mason, Supt. 
FRIDAY: 28 February 

WILTON, CONNECTICUT 
(7:00 P.M.) Representative: Mr. 
Anthony Brackett, Supt. 

All seniors interested should 
contact Professor Kendall as 
soon as possible for interview ap- 
pointments. 



STERLING PATTERNS 
in 

Towle — Gorham — Luni 
Reed and Barton 
International — Wallace 




50 Lisbon Street Dial 784-5241 



History Majors Discuss 
Career Opportunities 



Four Bates graduates discussed 
the career opportunities for stu- 
dents majoring in history at the 
latest in a series of Career Con- 
ferences held last Friday. 

Dr. Billias of Clark University 
opened last Friday's discussion, 
held in the Women's Union by 
stressing the awareness on the 
part of Graduate Schools of the 
exceptional student and the as- 
sistance such a student is likely to 
find. 

"For the student with a qpr in 
the neighborhood of 3.5 the grad- 
uate opportunities are unlimited," 
Dr. Billias stated. The availability 
of scholarships has increased 
tremendously since the era of 
academic poverty during the thir- 
ties and finances for such stu- 
dents need no longer be a hind- 
rance to an academic profession. 

Dr. William Metz of the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island faculty 
laid emphasis on the incentive 
factor in seeking a graduate edu- 



cation. "What the graduate 
schools are looking for in many 
cases," stated Dr. Metz, "is the 
student who even though he lacks 
the outstanding qpr still have the 
earnest desire to seek a reward- 
ing profession academically." 

The third speaker gave special 
attention to the other than scho- 
lastic training open to those hold- 
ing degrees in history. "The 
training going into that of a 
museum creator is a strenuous 
one requiring a broad and com- 
prehensive knowlege of historical 
perods and their relative im- 
portance," he stated. In a era 
when the museum is becoming a 
part of everyday life the poten- 
tial in this field is especially 
good. 

The concluding speaker, a 
Root-Tilden scholar, discussed 
the dedication necessary for the 
future lawyer. Interestingly 
enough the consideration of de- 
veopmental trends, so essential 



WCBB Features 



Tonight 

7:30 REPERTOIRE WORKSHOP 

— "A City Medley". Vocal- 
ist Fredna Parker performs 
eight songs by St. Louis 
composers. 

8:00 GREAT DECISIONS. 1964 

— "America and Commun- 
ism: The View From 
Abroad". The first program 
in this year's Great Deci- 
sions series. 

8:30 BRIDGE WITH JEAN COX 

— Intermediate bridge les- 
sons. 

9:00 JAZZ CASUAL — Muggsy 
Spanier, one of the great 
jazz cornettists, plays his 
favorite numbers for Ralph 
Gleason. 

in the historians study, becomes 
subordinated to an extreme em- 
phasis on detail in the study of 
law. 

The trend in the afternoon's 
discussions seemed to be empha- 
sis the personal reward and satis- 
faction from a career well chosen. 



Tomorrow Night 

8:30 FAR EASTERN ART — Dr. 

Graeffe explains and illu- 
strates "Noh" and "Kabuki 
(forms of popular Japanese 
theater.) 

8:00 THE AMERICAN CON- 
SERVATIVE — A docu- 
mentary on Conservatism 
in America. 

Friday Night 

7:00 ASTRONOMY FOR YOU 

— "How Time and Distance 
are Measured". A study of 
the solar system. 

Friday Night 

7:30 SOCIAL CONTROL AND 
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR — 

College credit course for 
teachers with Professor 
Geib of Colby College. 
8:00 N.E.T. DRAMA FESTIVAL 

— "Dandy Dick". A Vic- 
torian comedy by Arthur 
Wing Pinero in which a 
race horse wins a race that 
nicely solves everyone's 
problems. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: DON MacKENZIE 



After less than two years with the New England Telephone 
Company, Don MacKenzie (A.B.. 1958) rose to the posi- 
tion of a supervisor. 

One reason for Don's swift rise was his swift start. As 
a salesman. Don outperformed most of the other fifty sales- 
men in his office, and contributed a sound idea to reduce 
paperwork besides. 

Based on these achievements, Don was given the job 




of teaching other salesmen, and has had nearly two-thirds 
of the company's sales force in his classes. Again, an out- 
standing contribution! Again, a promotion his reward, 
this time to his current supervisory position. 

Don MacKenzie. like many young men, is impatient to 
make things happen for his company and himself. There 
are few places where such restlessness is more welcomed 
or rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business. 



BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 



TEUPHOME MAM-OF-THE-MONTH 




BATES STUDENT, FEBRUARY 12, 1964 



g>3 

THREE 



Bates Students Participate In 
U. S. Affairs Conference 



By Sue Lord '66 

Two Bates students recently at- 
tended the Student Conference 
for United States Affairs. Leon 
Hurwitz '65, a government major, 
and David Dhliwayo '64, a his- 
tory major, were selected by the 
speech and government depart- 
ments to fly to West Point for 
the conference held last Dec. 4-7. 
Schools from the United States 
and Canada sent delegates. 

The subject was the developing 
nations of the world and their 
problems. The broad scope of the 
conference was narrowed down 
to five more specific areas for 
panel discussion — Africa: South 
of the Sahara; the Middle East 
and North Africa; Southeast 
Asia; Latin America; and South 
Asia. 

Formal Dinner 

The affair was launched with a 
formal dinner where our dele- 
gates met the V.I.P.'s including 
Averill Harriman, Sunni Roy, and 
Prince Bernhard of the Nether- 
lands. 

According to David, who 
represented Africa (South of the 
Sahara), "the aim of the thing 
was to formulate policies con- 
cerning these developing coun- 
tries for recommendation to the 



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United States State Department." 
David's panel "tackled the areas 
of independent Africa, colonial 
Africa and the Republic of South 
Africa." He felt that "the dis- 
cussion of independent African 
countries was more cordial, since 
the U.S. can negotiate directly 
with their governments." The 
situation is reversed with colonial 
Africa because "the United States 
can't negotiate directly with the 
developing, countries, but only 
with the. mother country." The 
recommendation made by the 
panel for independent Africa was 
a simple one. "The State Dept. 
should establish industries and 
give aid to support and encourage 
agencies in favor of the U.S." 
Southern Rhodesia 
When asked whaW particular 
part he took in the discussion, 
David said, "I pushed them (the 
panel) to Southern Rhodesia. I 
had what you call a filibuster." 
The central problem in present 
colonial Africa is a difficult one 
as David describes it: "The 
Federation of Rhodesia and Nya- 
saland was to break on Dec. 31. 
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasa- 
land are both protectorates, and 
Southern Rhodesia a colony. The 
fear was that the Federation 
would declare itself independent 
of Britain, but would be under 
agents of British government. 



Therefore, with the advent of 
independence, the white settlers 
would have control instead of the 
people of Rhodesia." The line of 
actions for the United States 
would be to put pressure on Great 
Britain to broaden the fran- 
chise-in other words to amend the 
constitution to allow for majority 
rule before independence, thus 
insuring stability. As far as 
Mozambique and Angola are con- 
cerned, the U.S. should make 
Portugal aware of her responsibi- 
lities to accelerate political pro- 
gress and independence. These 
measures, again, are designed to 
insure stability. 

Another area that David's panel 
discussed was African politics. He 
upholds the view that "a one- 
party system can be democratic, 
provided there can be a left and 
right wing within the party." 
However, strongmen can destroy 
the one-party system "In African 
society," David pointed out, 
"there is a great respect for 
people at the top — but it is not 
hero worship, even though these 
men are heroes for independ- 
ence." 

Republic of South Africa 

The last area that David com- 
mented on was The Republic of 
South Africa It was recommend- 
ed that the U.S. abide by the 
Norwegian Resolution - of Nov. 



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At left is depicted a typical professor during the regular 
8686)00 at The University of Wisconsin. He is worried ahout 
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